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  • FIRST POST
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 1st Sep 17, 1:25 AM
    • 40Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    Urgent help needed (bank accounts)
    • #1
    • 1st Sep 17, 1:25 AM
    Urgent help needed (bank accounts) 1st Sep 17 at 1:25 AM
    I would be over the moon if i found a solution to this huge problem i have...so last year october i opened an account with nationwide and i ended up losing my debit card one evening and had not realized this until next morning, once i called them to get it blocked i had got the news that my account had been closed down. Days went on and they told me that it was for fraud and that someone had attempted to deposit £1300 into my account. Even though I had no clue of this happening I agreed and didnt mind that they closed the account until I had realized that I believe they put a blacklist on my name with all UK banks. The bank account was fairly new and I have no criminal activity history anything and in this case i was the victim of fraud and ended up being the fraudster. Nationwide denied that they had banned my name from any other banks or so but ever since this happened I have been too TSB, Lloyds, Santander and they have all opened me basic current accounts and closed them without reason after a week or so. I am highly frustrated and depressed as I have had no bank account for nearly a year and struggle to get paid from work and other things such as bills. What do you think is the cause of this and can anyone give me a solution please...i am lost and have tried everything possible to find out how can i get a normal bank account like a normal person. Thanks
Page 3
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 6th Sep 17, 9:46 PM
    • 1,975 Posts
    • 1,057 Thanks
    Ed-1
    But once I do a SAR, and find out who has a marker on me. I contact them and then they will just deny it or tell me they arent obliged to disclose this sort of information. So what do i do once i get the SAR from CIFAS, seems like I will just be going in circles.
    Originally posted by Ahmsbelkz
    You won't go round in circles once you can prove to them that you know they've put something on CIFAS.

    As it is, you can't say to them "you've registered me with CIFAS" as you don't know (for sure). Starting a formal complaint will get them to listen to you...
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 6th Sep 17, 9:51 PM
    • 40 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    Appreciate it. I feel like I can enquire them without the CIFAS report because they are the only ones to blame. But i will go ahead with the CIFAS proccess and hopefully get a result.

    My life is on pause right now literally.
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 6th Sep 17, 9:51 PM
    • 40 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    And what happens if the bank refuse to remove the marker?
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 6th Sep 17, 9:54 PM
    • 1,975 Posts
    • 1,057 Thanks
    Ed-1
    And what happens if the bank refuse to remove the marker?
    Originally posted by Ahmsbelkz
    If that's their final response to your formal complaint (they've got 8 weeks to issue a final response to a complaint) you can then complain to the Financial Ombudsman (for free) for an independent decision and they can order Nationwide to remove the CIFAS data if they uphold your complaint.
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 6th Sep 17, 9:59 PM
    • 40 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    Thank you. Financial ombudsman seem like a reliable source. Well hopefully this can all be sorted within this month.
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 6th Sep 17, 10:15 PM
    • 29,949 Posts
    • 18,970 Thanks
    DCFC79
    In future dont take your bank card out with you, take cash with you unless of course you decide to be tee total when your out and your the designated driver then take your card with you.
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 6th Sep 17, 10:33 PM
    • 40 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    In future dont take your bank card out with you, take cash with you unless of course you decide to be tee total when your out and your the designated driver then take your card with you.
    For sure! Thats if i get a bank card again haha...seems like i wont ever get one after whats happening to me. But appreciate your advice.
    • d123
    • By d123 6th Sep 17, 11:21 PM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 4,214 Thanks
    d123
    In future dont take your bank card out with you, take cash with you unless of course you decide to be tee total when your out and your the designated driver then take your card with you.
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    Though I'm still unsure how the simple loss of a bank card overnight can cause what is being alleged...
    ====
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 7th Sep 17, 12:20 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    Losing a card outside can be eligble for a fraudelent bank transfer by someone else. It has happened in many cases, they can also follow you find out your pin and steal it without you having it in a safe place. Its a possibility, all I know is thats what happened according to nationwide however they thought it was me who made the deposit attempt of £1300.
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 7th Sep 17, 8:25 AM
    • 1,648 Posts
    • 1,073 Thanks
    Robin9
    A strange story:
    Card used to put money INTO an account.
    Activity thought to be illegal.
    Card reported lost.
    Bank closes account.
    Marker put on account holder.
    Bank tells account holder why account closed.
    Account holder does not mind that account closed.
    No loss of money by account holder.

    Never heard one like that.
    Heard many where account holder gets paid for money laundering, account closed, bank gives no explanation.
    Originally posted by le loup
    I would love to hear Nationwide's side but unfortunately we won't.

    I suspect there's more to the story than we are being told.
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 7th Sep 17, 8:35 AM
    • 18,413 Posts
    • 14,124 Thanks
    agrinnall
    But once I do a SAR, and find out who has a marker on me. I contact them and then they will just deny it or tell me they arent obliged to disclose this sort of information. So what do i do once i get the SAR from CIFAS, seems like I will just be going in circles.
    Originally posted by Ahmsbelkz
    You're getting too far ahead of yourself, wait until you have the data from the SAR and take it from there. Tormenting yourself with "what-ifs" is not a good idea.
    • d123
    • By d123 7th Sep 17, 10:55 AM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 4,214 Thanks
    d123
    Losing a card outside can be eligble for a fraudelent bank transfer by someone else. It has happened in many cases, they can also follow you find out your pin and steal it without you having it in a safe place. Its a possibility, all I know is thats what happened according to nationwide however they thought it was me who made the deposit attempt of £1300.
    Originally posted by Ahmsbelkz
    If they had your card and pin surely they’d be withdrawing your money, not trying to deposit their money...
    ====
    • Ahmsbelkz
    • By Ahmsbelkz 7th Sep 17, 1:09 PM
    • 40 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Ahmsbelkz
    The account had no money in it as it was fairly new. Was going to be used just for direct debits luckily...
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 7th Sep 17, 1:19 PM
    • 1,648 Posts
    • 1,073 Thanks
    Robin9
    Before you opened the Nationwide Account - what happened to your salary and what happen now.

    Your last post says that the a/c was going to be used for DD only - how were you going to make credits to the a/c ?
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 7th Sep 17, 1:46 PM
    • 29,949 Posts
    • 18,970 Thanks
    DCFC79
    If they had your card and pin surely they’d be withdrawing your money, not trying to deposit their money...
    Originally posted by d123
    That's what I thought, hadn't crossed my mind that a transfer into the account would be of any benefit to the person who did it, if they had the cards PIN then yes it would be of benefit.

    Though I'm still unsure how the simple loss of a bank card overnight can cause what is being alleged...
    Originally posted by d123
    Seems quick to me but this is the banking sector, be standard for them.
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • d123
    • By d123 7th Sep 17, 4:07 PM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 4,214 Thanks
    d123
    Seems quick to me but this is the banking sector, be standard for them.
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    I’m still puzzled how the £1300 was (attempted to be) deposited outside of banking hours though...
    ====
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 7th Sep 17, 4:25 PM
    • 1,648 Posts
    • 1,073 Thanks
    Robin9
    I’m still puzzled how the £1300 was (attempted to be) deposited outside of banking hours though...
    Originally posted by d123
    What would make more sense is (attemted to be)
    WITHDRAWN rather than Deposited.
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • d123
    • By d123 7th Sep 17, 6:41 PM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 4,214 Thanks
    d123
    What would make more sense is (attemted to be)
    WITHDRAWN rather than Deposited.
    Originally posted by Robin9
    That is true.
    ====
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 8th Sep 17, 12:51 AM
    • 2,067 Posts
    • 2,849 Thanks
    EachPenny
    What would make more sense is (attemted to be) WITHDRAWN rather than Deposited.
    Originally posted by Robin9
    A hypothetical example (not saying this is what happened in the OP's case):

    Man goes to pub. Meets [stranger/friend/acquaintance]. [Stranger/friend/acquaintance] says "I've got a problem, I need to get a [friend/boss/colleague] to pay me some money, but I don't want my [wife/partner/accountant] to know anything about it." "Can you do me a massive favour and let my [friend/boss/colleague] pay the money into your account and then give me the cash. I'll make it worth your while."

    First man is a bit unsure so [stranger/friend/acquaintance] adds "They owe me £1300, but you'd be doing me a massive favour so if you give me a grand you can keep the rest." First man is now hooked and gives [stranger/friend/acquaintance] his account details.

    [Stranger/friend/acquaintance] contacts his [gambling/drugs/money laundering/terrorist] associates and tells them to do the online transfer. £1300 of 'dirty' money is deposited into first man's account. First man and [stranger/friend/acquaintance] go to cash machine to make first withdrawal - which may or may not work. They agree to meet up the following day to withdraw the rest of the money.

    At some point soon after, first man discovers his account is blocked and contacts bank. Bank explain the account is locked due to fraudulent activity. First man panics and tells bank he has lost his debit card, and the 'fraud' has nothing to do with him. Bank knows first man has assisted, or at least not protected his account, so has facilitated attempted illegal activity. Bank closes first man's account.

    That to me sounds like a plausible way in which someone could get their banking facilities withdrawn as a result of someone depositing money into their account.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • d123
    • By d123 8th Sep 17, 10:59 AM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 4,214 Thanks
    d123
    A hypothetical example (not saying this is what happened in the OP's case):

    At some point soon after, first man discovers his account is blocked and contacts bank. Bank explain the account is locked due to fraudulent activity. First man panics and tells bank he has lost his debit card, and the 'fraud' has nothing to do with him. Bank knows first man has assisted, or at least not protected his account, so has facilitated attempted illegal activity. Bank closes first man's account.

    That to me sounds like a plausible way in which someone could get their banking facilities withdrawn as a result of someone depositing money into their account.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    Agreed, but your timescale and the OPs story of losing his card on a night out and the whole scam having been perpetrated and his account already closed by the time he called the bank the following morning are different scenarios.
    ====
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