Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Bath cube
    • By Bath cube 30th Aug 17, 3:55 PM
    • 166Posts
    • 76Thanks
    Bath cube
    Buyer is calming jewellery is fake
    • #1
    • 30th Aug 17, 3:55 PM
    Buyer is calming jewellery is fake 30th Aug 17 at 3:55 PM
    Hi all. I listed a necklace for sale on preloved and it was sold within a week. The buyer messaged me yesterday to say a local jewellers told them it is fake. It was a sterling silver with platinum overlay necklet set with 4 blue diamonds which weighed almost half of a carat. The item was purchased for me in 2004 and cost £250 then from lesley Davies. I included the original receipt in the box with the item which clearly states the date and cost and the item code which stated diamond / stone jewellery next to the item code. I only wore it once because I don't like coloured gemstones. The stones are a pale aqua colour and are treated gems. The buyer paid by paypal and says they are going to make a refund claim and keep the necklet too as it is a fake. What can I do?.
Page 3
    • LilElvis
    • By LilElvis 5th Sep 17, 1:22 PM
    • 3,174 Posts
    • 8,787 Thanks
    LilElvis
    Peachy price I disagree with you about this one. I have a pendant from ernest jones which is marked 0.50 pnts on the reverse next to the hallmark, the matching earrings also do. I'm not saying all modern jewellery does have it but some do including high end pieces. The necklace I sold didn't state the points though.
    Originally posted by Bath cube
    Sorry, but I agree with peachyprice. Like her I have a lot of jewellery and not one piece has anything regarding the stone impressed into the mount. High end diamond jewellery doesn't need a "hallmark" because it will come with a recognised certificate, such as one issued by GIA, with one certificate for each stone.
    • Bath cube
    • By Bath cube 5th Sep 17, 2:04 PM
    • 166 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    Bath cube
    Maybe so. My emgagement ring has 1.25 pts on the inside of the band. It did come with a anchor diamond certificate though. Been speaking about this to a colleague whilst on a break. She said lots of buyers do this on ebay to get something for nothing. Preloved has much different rules than ebay eg you can't open a case for item not as described. They say it is up to both parties to resolve the matter. The buyer contacted them but they told him because he got the receipt he should take it up with the store it came from. If he does contact me today I will just repeat what I said yesterday evening.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 5th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    • 18,339 Posts
    • 47,010 Thanks
    Pollycat
    As I said up thread, I've bought some jewellery from eBay - only silver, mainly set with malachite, lapis etc.

    Not looked at preloved before - and don't like the sound of it.
    Sounds really stupid (not to say wrong from a consumer rights perspective) to tell the buyer to take it up with the store - given the fact that he didn't buy it from them and the purchase was 13 years ago anyway and not by the OP personally.

    Any reason you chose that website over eBay?
    Last edited by Pollycat; 05-09-2017 at 2:54 PM.
    • LilElvis
    • By LilElvis 5th Sep 17, 2:55 PM
    • 3,174 Posts
    • 8,787 Thanks
    LilElvis
    Maybe so. My emgagement ring has 1.25 pts on the inside of the band. It did come with a anchor diamond certificate though.
    Originally posted by Bath cube
    But, as established on your other thread, you purchased that ring from another mass-market jeweller with a poor quality stone. Even my stone jewellery from Georg Jensen and Tiffany aren't marked or certified.
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 8th Sep 17, 10:39 AM
    • 1,868 Posts
    • 2,512 Thanks
    comeandgo
    I'm having a problem believing anyone suggested the buyer now has receipt he has to deal with original seller. The contract is between you and your buyer. If he was to go to police, it's you the police would question and charge if found guilty of selling fake items.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 8th Sep 17, 10:51 AM
    • 18,339 Posts
    • 47,010 Thanks
    Pollycat
    I really hope we get an update on this.

    I too find what Paypal are saying very odd:
    Last week paypal told me as the buyer received the original proof of purchase it is up to him to contact the store. A colleague also mentioned today that since the buyer has both item and receipt it's no longer my problem and he should ask lesley Davies for a refund if the stones are not diamonds, because if they are (which they couldn't be) lesley Davies are in breach of contract and he is now the owner of the item. When I sold the item to him and provided proof of purchase.cost and the receipt states diamond it's lesley Davies not myself who need to rectify this matter.
    Originally posted by Bath cube
    Not to mention the extremely dubious opinion of the OP's colleague who thinks the OP's buyer should ask the original store for a refund 13 years down the line.
    • Bath cube
    • By Bath cube 13th Sep 17, 10:53 PM
    • 166 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    Bath cube
    I havent heard from the buyer since his last phone call. He has probably realised he can't scam me.
    • Bath cube
    • By Bath cube 15th Sep 17, 5:57 PM
    • 166 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    Bath cube
    He has given it One last try. I got a call on my way to work. Says he will return it if I refund but he wants to keep the receipt. My reply was I want the receipt and box as well or do one. He huffed oh ok I'm keeping it and hung up. My partner has bought me a monica vinadet necklace in the sale. An early Christmas gift I can wear to a wedding next month. It is marked as 925 silver but doesn't have a certificate or points hallmark. It's a full one carat of diamonds I'm chuffing happy with it.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 15th Sep 17, 7:33 PM
    • 18,339 Posts
    • 47,010 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Just goes to show that what we were telling you about it not being the norm for carat weight to be engraved on silver jewellery was correct.

    Monica Vinader?
    Looks very over-priced to me.
    Most expensive necklace on their website has .84 carat of diamonds set in silver priced at £1950.
    How much?

    ETA:
    Yes, your buyer was clearly trying it on.
    Unscrupulous scumbag.
    Last edited by Pollycat; 16-09-2017 at 7:36 AM.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 16th Sep 17, 4:49 PM
    • 9,947 Posts
    • 8,006 Thanks
    lincroft1710

    ETA:
    Yes, your buyer was clearly trying it on.
    Unscrupulous scumbag.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    Which is what I told the OP at post #2
    • Hermione Granger
    • By Hermione Granger 16th Sep 17, 11:36 PM
    • 783 Posts
    • 1,224 Thanks
    Hermione Granger
    Yes, your buyer was clearly trying it on.
    Unscrupulous scumbag.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    Which is what I told the OP at post #2
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    Did you really tell the OP that the buyer was clearly trying it on?
    I thought that you only suspected this.

    I suspect the buyer is scamming you.
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    • kaya
    • By kaya 17th Sep 17, 9:55 AM
    • 2,346 Posts
    • 2,725 Thanks
    kaya
    Judging by this... https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090301231633AAB9bkQ ...I would seriously doubt they were genuine diamonds and were man made which I personally would class as fake, natural blue natural diamonds go for around $20000 a carat, man made or (fake) ones which can also be cloudy off colour ones that are heat treated and irradiated go for about $50 a carat,(I'm not a gemmologist) possibly the buyer thought there luck was in and they were getting a £5000 item for a silly price
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 17th Sep 17, 11:17 AM
    • 18,339 Posts
    • 47,010 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Judging by this... https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090301231633AAB9bkQ ...I would seriously doubt they were genuine diamonds and were man made which I personally would class as fake, natural blue natural diamonds go for around $20000 a carat, man made or (fake) ones which can also be cloudy off colour ones that are heat treated and irradiated go for about $50 a carat,(I'm not a gemmologist) possibly the buyer thought there luck was in and they were getting a £5000 item for a silly price
    Originally posted by kaya
    I really doubt that any jeweller would put a naturally coloured diamond (they're sometimes referred to as 'fancy') in a silver necklace.

    In fact the OP was very clear in her first post about them being treated gems:

    The stones are a pale aqua colour and are treated gems.
    Originally posted by Bath cube
    You might consider heat-treated diamonds as fakes but this article is interesting:
    These are real, mined diamonds, which have been treated with exactly the same conditions radiation and high temperature conditions that would have produced a natural fancy in the Earth's crust. They are in every sense, real diamonds. The real beauty and popularity of these gemstones lies in the fact that they combine the unmistakable dazzle and brilliance of a diamond with the color saturation of colored gems, like rubies and emeralds.
    However, there are laboratory created faux fancies too, where the diamond crystal was grown in a laboratory and not mined. So when you shop for colored diamond jewelry ask about the origin of the gemstones, and check the certificate of origin to verify authenticity. Make sure you know what you are buying.
    http://ezinearticles.com/?Colored-Diamonds---Are-They-Real-Or-Fake-Diamonds?&id=3629072

    As long as these were natural mined diamonds that had been heat-treated and the seller was upfront about the treatment, I'd class them as diamonds, not fake.
    If they were laboratory manufactured, that's different.
    I wouldn't necessarily expect staff at Ernest Jones to know or understand the difference.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 17th Sep 17, 7:38 PM
    • 9,947 Posts
    • 8,006 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Did you really tell the OP that the buyer was clearly trying it on?
    I thought that you only suspected this.
    Originally posted by Hermione Granger
    Unless I am in a position to state something absolutely definitely and provable, I use words such as "suspect", "think", "believe", etc. I was fairly certain but of course it has only been proven as the thread has progressed.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 18th Sep 17, 9:14 AM
    • 18,339 Posts
    • 47,010 Thanks
    Pollycat
    On the subject of 'fancy' diamonds, I recall an episode of Antiques Roadshow where a woman brought in a ring that she thought was aquamarine.

    The expert got all emotional as he said it was a natural blue diamond, very rare and very expensive.
    • Bath cube
    • By Bath cube 19th Sep 17, 2:11 PM
    • 166 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    Bath cube
    Of course most blue diamond jewellery is irridated or heat treated. Could you imagine if the stones in my necklace had been untreated natural fancy diamonds? They would be worth a lot more than £250!. Some buyers expect the state diamonds for a argos price.
    • Bath cube
    • By Bath cube 19th Sep 17, 2:16 PM
    • 166 Posts
    • 76 Thanks
    Bath cube
    Pollycat. The monica vinader was bought for £95.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 20th Sep 17, 8:08 AM
    • 18,339 Posts
    • 47,010 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Pollycat. The monica vinader was bought for £95.
    Originally posted by Bath cube
    Looking at the prices on her website for between .85 carat of diamonds (£1950) and .025 carat (£175), I'd be wondering if I'd bought a fake.
    Or if they'd missed a '0' off the price.

    1 carat of diamonds (even tiny chips) for £95?
    • vivatifosi
    • By vivatifosi 21st Sep 17, 8:52 PM
    • 17,369 Posts
    • 108,740 Thanks
    vivatifosi
    I am late to the party on this thread. I have a blue diamond jewellery piece. I don't think it looks anything like Topaz, London blue would be the most similar but they are different, I don't see how they can be mixed up. Aquamarine is very different too. Fwiw I think the most similar blue is indicolite tourmaline. Here's an indicolite set with blue diamonds..

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7f49LuOqya0

    As for real/heat treated, nobody could possibly expect untreated blue diamonds at that price, and they certainly wouldn't be set in silver. Here's an example of heat treated blue diamonds at the right price point, though I think they look a bit green in the pic.

    https://www.gemporia.com/en-gb/product/blue-diamond-ring-with-white-diamond-in-sterling-silver-079ct/wokk86/

    Cheap white diamonds tend to have a selzer ish appearance and don't sparkle as much as they tend to be more heavily included. They are certainly available though.
    Please stay safe in the sun and learn the A-E of melanoma: A = asymmetry, B = irregular borders, C= different colours, D= diameter, larger than 6mm, E = evolving, is your mole changing? Most moles are not cancerous, any doubts, please check next time you visit your GP.
    • donnac2558
    • By donnac2558 22nd Sep 17, 8:45 AM
    • 2,363 Posts
    • 1,962 Thanks
    donnac2558
    Yes GemsTV as its called do sell blue diamonds in sterling silver for actually reasonable prices. They do put on the screen I to show they are irradiated to get the colour.

    This is accepted by the jewellery trade as a treatment.

    Most rubies are filled as the unfilled ones are thousands to buy. By filled they are filled with glass, again recognised by the jewellery trade as acceptable.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

280Posts Today

1,483Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @TfLTravelAlerts: Oxford Circus and Bond Street stations now both reopened and all trains are stopping normally.

  • RT @metpoliceuk: We have not located any trace of suspects, evidence of shots fired or casualties. Officers still on scene. If you are in a?

  • My hopes and prayers are that this turns out to be nothing. Stay safe.

  • Follow Martin