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  • FIRST POST
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 28th Aug 17, 12:59 AM
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    Johnmcl7
    Dad disabled after accident, unsure how to proceed
    • #1
    • 28th Aug 17, 12:59 AM
    Dad disabled after accident, unsure how to proceed 28th Aug 17 at 12:59 AM
    I've been doing some reading but would appreciate some advice as this is a world I'm not at all familiar with. My Dad had an accident and broke his hip at the end of last year and needed to have it replaced with an artificial one (only the ball part, not a full hip replacement). He's had trouble with infections since then, he fell while in hospital and dislocated it forcing them to remove the hip and put a temporary repair in. The plan was he'd recover enough to have surgery to fit another hip replacement but it's now been decided that any surgery is too risky and he will need to manage as he is.

    I'm not sure exactly what mobility he will have but we believe he should be able to move short distances himself with a zimmer frame but it doesn't look like he will be able to climb stairs and won't be able to use the bath.

    I'm looking into what can be done to make this work thinking along the lines of getting a stairlift potentially and modifying the bathroom to remove the bath and fit some sort of wetroom. From what I've read, as he's retired and over 64 he can't claim PIP or similar. The Scottish disability site mentions help from the council to make changes to the house and spoken to an occupational therapist as the site recommends but they weren't very helpful.

    I think it's possibly some time before he's home but would like to have modifications made before he's home (it seems it's going to take a while regardless) and would to know what options there are first.

    Thanks,
    John
Page 2
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 30th Aug 17, 2:13 PM
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    TBagpuss
    I think it depends on the house. A lot of people prefer baths, and in a family home, with a baby or young child, baths are much more useful. On a personal note, a bath is a deal breaker for me. I'd consider a property with no bath if there was space to put a bath back in, but the cost of doing that would be knocked off any offer I got.

    However, OP has said that that isn't really an issue as his parents what to stay in the house so they are thinking about what will work for them, not the possible resale value of the property.

    OP, talk to your mum and dad about what they prefer - and about your dad's prognosis, and then they can decide whether switching to a walk in bath or a large shower is better, or looking at fitting a shower in a addition to the bath, or even looking at aids such as grab bars or seats.

    Depending on how much he is expected to recover, a stair lift might be a good idea, or alternatively, look at whether it would be possible to rearrange the room s to let him sleep downstairs to begin with (obviously a no go if they don't have a suitable downstairs loo.)
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 30th Aug 17, 2:46 PM
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    Savvy_Sue
    switching to a walk in bath
    Originally posted by TBagpuss
    think very very carefully before installing a walk in bath.

    Bear in mind that the user will have to walk in BEFORE the water is run, and stay in UNTIL the water has drained.

    Not my idea of a nice bath ... although possibly in a warm enough bathroom, if able to stand while the water drains, it might not be so bad.
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    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 30th Aug 17, 3:27 PM
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    margaretclare
    think very very carefully before installing a walk in bath.

    Bear in mind that the user will have to walk in BEFORE the water is run, and stay in UNTIL the water has drained.

    Not my idea of a nice bath ... although possibly in a warm enough bathroom, if able to stand while the water drains, it might not be so bad.
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    Couldn't agree more. I never understood how they worked, until someone explained that you have to be in it, stark naked, while the water creeps in around your ankles.

    From what I hear, bath vs shower is very much a personal preference. We haven't had a bath - as in lie down in warm water - for about 15 years now. I defy anyone to say we are dirty people. I love my daily shower and so does DH. We have to have what's called 'level access' i.e. there is no step up.

    It might be an idea to visit a local disability shop and look at grab-handles, along with all the other things that are available to help.
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    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 30th Aug 17, 4:44 PM
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    teddysmum
    I'm 68 and do sometimes have problems getting out of the bath (in is no problem) but would hate a shower. This is probably because ,at school we were marshalled through a series of steamy showers after PE lessons and I dreaded them, so have never fancied water dropping down on me.


    Also,a bath is more relaxing if you want to recline while warming your body.


    Would one of the inflatable bath seats help ? It would take up much space, when not in use, so would leave the bathroom looking normal and being soft would be unlikely to damage the bath's surface.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 30th Aug 17, 5:30 PM
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    Johnmcl7
    Pity he's so far away. Have a look at the kinds of things that are now being done at the Nuffield Orthpaedic Centre, Oxford. It was only opened in 2007 by the Duchess of Cornwall and what they can do there is not replacement, not revision, but complete reconstruction. This has been done for my DH, age 82, earlier this year. It was a 3-way process - orthopaedics, microbiology and plastic surgery. The man who did it is a Scot - Mr Ben Kendrick - and my DH was referred to him by another Scot, Mr Anthony Greer at our local hospital.
    Originally posted by margaretclare
    The problem isn't the hip surgery itself as that part went fine before, the issue is that any surgery would be high risk to him. They've given it plenty of time as it's not a decision to take lightly but that's the way it is.

    John
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 30th Aug 17, 5:54 PM
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    Johnmcl7
    I'm 68 and do sometimes have problems getting out of the bath (in is no problem) but would hate a shower. This is probably because ,at school we were marshalled through a series of steamy showers after PE lessons and I dreaded them, so have never fancied water dropping down on me.


    Also,a bath is more relaxing if you want to recline while warming your body.


    Would one of the inflatable bath seats help ? It would take up much space, when not in use, so would leave the bathroom looking normal and being soft would be unlikely to damage the bath's surface.
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    The bath almost never gets used as a bath (possibly twice in the last five years by my visiting sister) and certainly never by my Dad which is partly prompting this. The hospital supplied a seat for him to place in the bath for using the shower but the problem is he has to step over the high side of the bath which was difficult before and I don't think it will be possible in his current state.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 30th Aug 17, 6:07 PM
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    margaretclare
    The problem isn't the hip surgery itself as that part went fine before, the issue is that any surgery would be high risk to him. They've given it plenty of time as it's not a decision to take lightly but that's the way it is.

    John
    Originally posted by Johnmcl7
    I am so sorry. There is obviously more going on related to your Dad's health and physical condition and his clinical team will be well aware of it all.

    We have been very very lucky with all that DH has had done. The problem boiled down to infection in his femur from earlier knee replacement/revision. A few months ago we had no idea at all that 'reconstruction' was even possible.

    I understand how stepping over the side of a bath would be impossible for your Dad. Sometimes when we've stayed in hotels we've asked for a shower and been told 'oh the shower is over the bath'. Absolutely useless to us and dangerous even.

    The company who did our 'wet room' have a lot of experience and understand the sort of things that people require. Have a look at the link for Mobility Solutions.
    Last edited by margaretclare; 30-08-2017 at 6:11 PM.
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    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 8th Feb 18, 1:59 PM
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    BorisThomson
    Spamming on a thread about disability could not be more distasteful.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 8th Feb 18, 10:46 PM
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    Johnmcl7
    Spamming on a thread about disability could not be more distasteful.
    Originally posted by BorisThomson
    Can't expect spammers to have any ethics, thankfully it's removed already.

    To give an update as it's been some time since I initially posted, aside from a couple of trips back to the hospital, my Dad has been home.

    He's getting attendance allowance which went through without issue and also a blue badge. They also fitted additional hand rails for the front door step and the stairs, we paid for them to fit rails for the back door. Initially he wasn't allowed a zimmer frame but after a fall and him going back to hospital, we've got a couple of zimmer frames which he's much more stable on.

    We've paid to have the bath converted to a walk in shower, he's not good on the stairs but he is managing them so holding off on the stairlift for now.

    Thanks again for the replies and advice.
    John
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 9th Feb 18, 2:32 AM
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    deannatrois
    Thanks for this thread. It applies to my situation, I am not in a situation yet where I need a sit down shower but I do need a shower due to arthritis and ASD (sitting in water is something I dread, i am ok with showers). OT have agreed to a shower but the sit down over bath sort they normally install is going to cause more problems than it will sort (I also have problems stepping over the bath side and they are insisting on putting the shower on the long wall in the middle of the bath which will mean if I have balance issues I am at a high risk of falling over the side of the bath - no room to take a step back to rebalance myself). A grab rail won't help, once again it would all be set up for a sitter.

    So I am now looking at ways of installing a very small walk in shower myself. Its a council house though, so may not be able to get permission and saving the money to have it done will take time.
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 9th Feb 18, 7:56 AM
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    GlasweJen
    Can't expect spammers to have any ethics, thankfully it's removed already.

    To give an update as it's been some time since I initially posted, aside from a couple of trips back to the hospital, my Dad has been home.

    He's getting attendance allowance which went through without issue and also a blue badge. They also fitted additional hand rails for the front door step and the stairs, we paid for them to fit rails for the back door. Initially he wasn't allowed a zimmer frame but after a fall and him going back to hospital, we've got a couple of zimmer frames which he's much more stable on.

    We've paid to have the bath converted to a walk in shower, he's not good on the stairs but he is managing them so holding off on the stairlift for now.

    Thanks again for the replies and advice.
    John
    Originally posted by Johnmcl7
    Hi John, glad to hear your dads on the mend and on the correct support. If you ever get into the stairlift market consider second hand, most will be fine as long as the staircase doesnt turn or have any unusual high steps or anything. You could save yourselves a small fortune.
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