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  • FIRST POST
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 24th Aug 17, 10:05 AM
    • 197Posts
    • 337Thanks
    MrsSippi
    What makes a good cleaner?
    • #1
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:05 AM
    What makes a good cleaner? 24th Aug 17 at 10:05 AM
    Following on from the other thread about cleaners I was wondering ....

    I am due to start a job cleaning next week and I've never done it before (i mean as a paid job not that I've never cleaned ) A good cleaner is clearly held in very high regard so I was wondering, in your mind, what makes a good cleaner? Obviously it needs to be someone reliable, trustworthy etc but what is it that makes you say "my cleaner is fantastic" or " my cleaner is worth her weight in gold" etc. It's clear from the other thread that plenty of people love their cleaners but what is it that makes you feel that way?
Page 2
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 26th Aug 17, 9:13 PM
    • 15,172 Posts
    • 20,624 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    A non smoker!!!

    Even if they smoked in their car on the way there, I could still smell traces of it. Just not pleasant!!

    My best cleaner just knew what needed doing!

    In general, as long as the kitchen and bathroom sparkle, then I am happy...
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 27th Aug 17, 8:51 PM
    • 37,641 Posts
    • 33,954 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    Parents used to have a cleaner and were really irritated if they found cleaner had not worked full hours. Would never speak to cleaner about it, just moaned about it. Never took into account that the cleaner would do extra stuff if they noticed it needed doing.

    So I guess if you find the job consistently takes less time than originally scheduled, talk to your client if you can't obviously fill the time with other tasks.

    If you move something, put it back where you found it, rather than re-arranging your client's ornaments.

    And find out what is important to your client: I have a friend who is unwell and sometimes housebound: they need someone quiet, who won't use products which cause reactions, and who will do pretty much exactly what they're asked to do, in the way they're asked to do it. Me, I'd let the cleaner get on with it, but my friend likes things done in particular ways.

    The customer is always right.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 1 shawl, 2 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure, 1 sock ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, t'other sock (just about to turn the heel!)
    • MrsSippi
    • By MrsSippi 3rd Sep 17, 1:06 PM
    • 197 Posts
    • 337 Thanks
    MrsSippi
    Thanks for all the further replies. Well..... I have started the job and admittedly I've only been once but could do with some opinions on this.....

    I have been employed for 2 hrs a week to cover 1.5 hrs cleaning and .5 hrs dog walking. The wage set by my employers is £8/he which tbh is lower than I would have liked but given that I have no 'official'cleaning experience it is something I am not going to begrudge.

    Anyway..... the property is an average size 2 bed bungalow and in 1.5 hrs my clients expect me to Hoover and mop throughout (lounge, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen and conservatory), dust throughout, clean kitchen and bathroom, dust and polish in bedrooms and conservatory and lounge AND also clean front windows.
    Admittedly it was my first visit so took a bit longer as I was trying to find some cleaning bits which weren't left out for me (mop, Hoover attachments they wanted used etc) but I was there still cleaning after 2.5 hrs having not yet walked dog and still not completely finished the cleaning.

    Anyway, having mentioned this to a couple of people (a. Without naming names etc and b. Just to garner some opinions) it would appear the general consensus is that my employers are expecting far too much for the time and money. Believe me, I started work the second I got in the door and didn't stop once but it still wasn't enough time.

    I'm not sure if my employers have had a cleaner before so can't honestly tell if they genuinely don't realise they are being unrealistic in their expectations or if they are taking the pee.

    I am not going to say anything yet as want to see what 2nd visit is like and if they make any comments about what was done but would appreciate some thoughts on this. Equally, I am not going to have a moan at all but before I approach the subject with them (if indeed it's needed) I just want to make sure it's not me who is being unrealistic etc.
    • jackomdj
    • By jackomdj 3rd Sep 17, 1:25 PM
    • 2,786 Posts
    • 3,466 Thanks
    jackomdj
    Personally I would say something sooner rather than later. Let them know that for the amount of time the most you could do is a quick surface clean over that area, if they want you to clean it a bit deeper you will need son more time.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 3rd Sep 17, 1:31 PM
    • 28,201 Posts
    • 71,711 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Anyway..... the property is an average size 2 bed bungalow and in 1.5 hrs my clients expect me to Hoover and mop throughout (lounge, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen and conservatory), dust throughout, clean kitchen and bathroom, dust and polish in bedrooms and conservatory and lounge AND also clean front windows.
    Originally posted by MrsSippi
    My cleaner does a 3-bed house in two hours - but it's a quick dust everywhere, a thorough hoover (which is the bit I can't cope with), a good clean of the bathroom and kitchen (although they are never 'dirty' as I usually wipe down as I go during the week) - she wouldn't have time to clean windows as well.

    The house is reasonably tidy so there isn't a lot of moving things in order to clean.

    Your 'employer' isn't paying you enough per hour and is expecting you to do too much in the time.
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 6th Sep 17, 12:36 AM
    • 2,023 Posts
    • 3,072 Thanks
    Kim kim
    I go out and come back 2 hours later and it looks nice and smells nice. Mine does all the rooms as a general clean and then each week does a deep clean of 1 or 2 rooms e.g. cupboard doors, skirting etc - the stuff that just never gets done
    Originally posted by haras_nosirrah
    God that's good going.
    I think mine is energetic & she just does the general clean. Smallish 2 bed house & single tidy woman living alone!
    • BrassicWoman
    • By BrassicWoman 6th Sep 17, 8:47 AM
    • 1,298 Posts
    • 5,401 Thanks
    BrassicWoman
    I pay for 3 hours for a 2 bedroom flat, and it does take all that time to do it properly. No windows - that s what my window cleaner is for! And extra once in a while for a deep clean.

    Have a chat now, not later!
    Downsized and mortgage free
    September 17 grocery challenge £64.28/£100
    • Pricivius
    • By Pricivius 6th Sep 17, 1:15 PM
    • 576 Posts
    • 960 Thanks
    Pricivius
    To clarify a couple of points:

    Change - I left the exact money for the hours and rate the cleaner was supposed to be doing. She unilaterally changed it so she was actually earning £2 less, but was cleaning for half an hour less at a higher hourly rate.
    I have always left the correct money - or what I thought was the correct money before the cleaner decided to change it without saying anything!



    Kitchen roll - I have no problem with it being used for glass or mirrors, but my cleaner does not have to clean either and she used up an entire roll. That's excessive - she used it for everything. I have always provided everything requested in terms of fluids, cloths, brushes etc..


    As for your query, OP, they are expecting too much. I ask for two bathrooms (one of which is rarely used) and a kitchen in 2 hours, with whatever hoovering can be fitted in at the end.
    • es5595
    • By es5595 6th Sep 17, 1:34 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    es5595
    OP, you don't say where you're based, but £8 sounds very low. I'd suggest at least £10, especially since I'm assuming you're self employed?
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 6th Sep 17, 3:15 PM
    • 1,892 Posts
    • 6,311 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    To clarify a couple of points:

    Kitchen roll - I have no problem with it being used for glass or mirrors, but my cleaner does not have to clean either and she used up an entire roll. That's excessive - she used it for everything. I have always provided everything requested in terms of fluids, cloths, brushes etc..
    Originally posted by Pricivius
    We joke that our cleaner must eat kitchen roll. Somehow she uses loads, despite me providing j cloths and microfibre cloths which get washed after use.

    Our biggest bug bear is that, despite us saying not to several times, she puts kitchen roll down the toilet in the ensuite. It is a macerating toilet and we have had to rip it out twice and replace motor/entire unit. 3rd time it was fixable with just a major service where they cleaned out tons of macerated paper. She still swears that she never does it.

    Our cleaner is also quite aggressive with a hoover - we don't have much carpet due to big fluffy dogs but every skirting board has scuffs in the paint where she has bashed it with the hoover.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 7th Sep 17, 4:31 AM
    • 19,505 Posts
    • 31,518 Thanks
    Spendless
    We joke that our cleaner must eat kitchen roll. Somehow she uses loads, despite me providing j cloths and microfibre cloths which get washed after use.

    Our biggest bug bear is that, despite us saying not to several times, she puts kitchen roll down the toilet in the ensuite. It is a macerating toilet and we have had to rip it out twice and replace motor/entire unit. 3rd time it was fixable with just a major service where they cleaned out tons of macerated paper. She still swears that she never does it.

    Our cleaner is also quite aggressive with a hoover - we don't have much carpet due to big fluffy dogs but every skirting board has scuffs in the paint where she has bashed it with the hoover.
    Originally posted by MallyGirl
    I'd be hiding the kitchen roll when she comes round. Unless she fetches her own?
    • SuzieSue
    • By SuzieSue 7th Sep 17, 8:18 AM
    • 3,650 Posts
    • 3,952 Thanks
    SuzieSue
    I'd be hiding the kitchen roll when she comes round. Unless she fetches her own?
    Originally posted by Spendless
    I'd be saying good bye.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 8th Sep 17, 11:27 AM
    • 1,892 Posts
    • 6,311 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    it is tempting but she also feeds the cat when we are away - couldn't use a cattery for her as she has stress induced fits when put in a box for travel - and puts up with the dogs.
    • SuzieSue
    • By SuzieSue 8th Sep 17, 11:28 AM
    • 3,650 Posts
    • 3,952 Thanks
    SuzieSue
    it is tempting but she also feeds the cat when we are away - couldn't use a cattery for her as she has stress induced fits when put in a box for travel - and puts up with the dogs.
    Originally posted by MallyGirl
    Yes, I assumed there must be other reasons why you keep her on.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 8th Sep 17, 11:55 AM
    • 1,614 Posts
    • 4,302 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Thanks for all the further replies. Well..... I have started the job and admittedly I've only been once but could do with some opinions on this.....

    I have been employed for 2 hrs a week to cover 1.5 hrs cleaning and .5 hrs dog walking. The wage set by my employers is £8/he which tbh is lower than I would have liked but given that I have no 'official'cleaning experience it is something I am not going to begrudge.

    Anyway..... the property is an average size 2 bed bungalow and in 1.5 hrs my clients expect me to Hoover and mop throughout (lounge, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen and conservatory), dust throughout, clean kitchen and bathroom, dust and polish in bedrooms and conservatory and lounge AND also clean front windows.
    Admittedly it was my first visit so took a bit longer as I was trying to find some cleaning bits which weren't left out for me (mop, Hoover attachments they wanted used etc) but I was there still cleaning after 2.5 hrs having not yet walked dog and still not completely finished the cleaning.

    Anyway, having mentioned this to a couple of people (a. Without naming names etc and b. Just to garner some opinions) it would appear the general consensus is that my employers are expecting far too much for the time and money. Believe me, I started work the second I got in the door and didn't stop once but it still wasn't enough time.

    I'm not sure if my employers have had a cleaner before so can't honestly tell if they genuinely don't realise they are being unrealistic in their expectations or if they are taking the pee.

    I am not going to say anything yet as want to see what 2nd visit is like and if they make any comments about what was done but would appreciate some thoughts on this. Equally, I am not going to have a moan at all but before I approach the subject with them (if indeed it's needed) I just want to make sure it's not me who is being unrealistic etc.
    Originally posted by MrsSippi

    The going rate for dog walking is at least £10 an hour, more in expensive areas like London, and most would only do at least an hour minimum.

    I do think you are being expected to do too much.
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 8th Sep 17, 2:30 PM
    • 1,892 Posts
    • 6,311 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    I pay my dog walker £20 to walk my 2 big dogs for an hour - but she has full indemnity insurance, is registered with the council, etc.
    • ElusiveLucy
    • By ElusiveLucy 8th Sep 17, 4:11 PM
    • 567 Posts
    • 3,034 Thanks
    ElusiveLucy
    It takes the two of us 1.5 hours to clean our two bed house - one bathroom and one downstairs loo. I think your employer is expecting far too much if they want a good job done. If I had a cleaner I would expect them to take 3 hours to clean our house reasonably well. Mind you I would only have that done once a fortnight, then do a quick run around myself in between times (hoover, bathrooms etc)
    What goes around comes around.....I hope!
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 9th Sep 17, 2:52 AM
    • 4,743 Posts
    • 6,674 Thanks
    deannatrois
    Reminds me of some very 'posh' people who expected me to babysit for their kids for £2 an hour. Even in the Mid 90's this was slave rates. The job ended when they asked me to do extra hours and I said I could but only in a limited way because I had exams.., and then I was left there til midnite after being told I could leave at 6pm. I couldn't contact them, nothing. I never worked there again and I am afraid told the father what I thought when he walked through the door, which wasn't something I am happy about but I was pretty cross. I would do the washing up because I didn't like sitting there doing nothing while there was a sink full of dirty stuff, they asked me to bath their daughter (I mean, I could have been anyone) but I was never an actual person to them. And the resentment built lol.
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 9th Sep 17, 11:06 AM
    • 2,023 Posts
    • 3,072 Thanks
    Kim kim
    Thanks for all the further replies. Well..... I have started the job and admittedly I've only been once but could do with some opinions on this.....

    I have been employed for 2 hrs a week to cover 1.5 hrs cleaning and .5 hrs dog walking. The wage set by my employers is £8/he which tbh is lower than I would have liked but given that I have no 'official'cleaning experience it is something I am not going to begrudge.

    Anyway..... the property is an average size 2 bed bungalow and in 1.5 hrs my clients expect me to Hoover and mop throughout (lounge, 2 bedrooms, bathroom, kitchen and conservatory), dust throughout, clean kitchen and bathroom, dust and polish in bedrooms and conservatory and lounge AND also clean front windows.
    Admittedly it was my first visit so took a bit longer as I was trying to find some cleaning bits which weren't left out for me (mop, Hoover attachments they wanted used etc) but I was there still cleaning after 2.5 hrs having not yet walked dog and still not completely finished the cleaning.

    Anyway, having mentioned this to a couple of people (a. Without naming names etc and b. Just to garner some opinions) it would appear the general consensus is that my employers are expecting far too much for the time and money. Believe me, I started work the second I got in the door and didn't stop once but it still wasn't enough time.

    I'm not sure if my employers have had a cleaner before so can't honestly tell if they genuinely don't realise they are being unrealistic in their expectations or if they are taking the pee.

    I am not going to say anything yet as want to see what 2nd visit is like and if they make any comments about what was done but would appreciate some thoughts on this. Equally, I am not going to have a moan at all but before I approach the subject with them (if indeed it's needed) I just want to make sure it's not me who is being unrealistic etc.
    Originally posted by MrsSippi
    Is this a proper job, do you declare the income with your other income for tax & NI?

    If it's cash in hand & you don't like the rate/terms I suspect they will find someone else who does.

    Your rate is more than the minimum wage & many many people work for that & pay a third of it for tax, NI & pension.

    My cleaner runs her own small business, she's insured & CRBed.
    I pay her £12.50 an hour, she supplies the materials (she does for all her clients).

    Are you insured? Do you provide materials?
    What's the going rate in your area?
    Last edited by Kim kim; 09-09-2017 at 11:09 AM.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 9th Sep 17, 11:28 AM
    • 945 Posts
    • 999 Thanks
    NeilCr
    What makes a good cleaner is going to depend on the customer

    I'm a bloke on my own who socialises a lot but rarely has visitors. I've also got a weird cat who can't go out (FIV+).

    I've known my cleaner for ages - she's a friend now. I want the house clean (not sparkling or deep cleaned) - she comes in once a week - vacuums, washes the floors, does the bathroom and downstairs loo, cleans up the kitchen. That suits me fine

    I don't need/want a lot of tidying up around me. Just means I have to find things

    She has a key and usually comes when I am out. She and the cat get on well and I trust her not to let him out

    Others will have different requirements. These suit me - she is looking for a full time job (hopes she gets one). I'm dreading the thought of having to look for a replacement as she fits the bill so well!
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