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    • MSE Megan F
    • By MSE Megan F 24th Aug 17, 9:55 AM
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    MSE Megan F
    0 WOW
    MSE News: Is lipstick really a liquid? Airports enforce different security rules
    • #1
    • 24th Aug 17, 9:55 AM
    0 WOW
    MSE News: Is lipstick really a liquid? Airports enforce different security rules 24th Aug 17 at 9:55 AM
    Confused holidaymakers are being forced to cram cosmetics such as lipstick, eye liner and solid deodorant into their 'liquids' bags at airport security - or otherwise risk having to throw them away - because UK airports are enforcing a range of different rules, MoneySavingExpert.com can reveal...
    Read the full story:
    'Is lipstick really a liquid? Airports enforce different make-up security rules'

    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply.
    Last edited by MSE Luke; 24-08-2017 at 12:14 PM.
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Page 1
    • heatherw_01
    • By heatherw_01 24th Aug 17, 10:03 AM
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    heatherw_01
    • #2
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:03 AM
    • #2
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:03 AM
    I do think it is ridiculous that they all seem to set their own rules. I always go by the government website and follow that.

    Manchester Airport is the only airport I have been to that also makes me take out my very small travel hairdryer too even though it is below the electrical dimensions that is shown on the government website
    I'm the Board Guide on Quick Grabbit, Freebies, Overseas Holidays & Travel Planning and the UK Holidays, Days Out & Entertainments boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 24th Aug 17, 10:18 AM
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    greenbee
    • #3
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:18 AM
    • #3
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:18 AM
    All airports have slightly different rules (I came through Manchester for the first time this week Heather, and noticed hairdryers and straighteners on the list for taking out... mind you, most people hadn't worked out the liquids rules as there was a massive backlog of people emptying full-size toiletries as a result).

    I've traveled with the same zipped 1 litre clear cosmetic bag for 8 years, and fly a fair amount - to different locations every time, often multi-destination trips. As well as liquid toiletries and cosmetics it also contains my toothbrush, dental floss etc (and I can pack a LOT into it). From memory I've twice been told I have to use the airport sandwich bags - I think both times at Heathrow T2 a couple of years ago (they certainly haven't had a problem with it this year).

    Some airports ask for phones and chargers to be unpacked. Some make EVERYONE take shoes off.

    Interestingly, on the occasions where lipbalm/moisturiser/handcream are accidentally left in my handbag, I'm never picked up on it...
    • AlexMac
    • By AlexMac 24th Aug 17, 10:23 AM
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    AlexMac
    • #4
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:23 AM
    • #4
    • 24th Aug 17, 10:23 AM
    I do think it is ridiculous that they all seem to set their own rules. I always go by the government website and follow that...
    Originally posted by heatherw_01
    Yup; but even the "Government Rules" are a great example of "something must be done"-ery. Let's remind ourselves why these "temporary restrictions" on lipstick, lemonade and Limoncello were introduced.

    I was in Italy and about to fly home in 2006 when the CIA leaned on UK authorities to close down a ring of wannabe terrorists who were planning to bring down a flight to the US using explosives disguised in drinks bottles in cabin baggage.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/liquids-ban-on-flights-10th-anniversary-do-we-still-need-it-a7181216.html

    My godsons and I, having already left our little flat in Puglia, enjoyed an unexpected 3 days extra holiday in Rome, as London airspace was closed while they (precipitately) mopped up the conspirators. It was a great example of intelligence-led sleuthing, and the subsequent restriction was meant to be temporary - maybe up to 18 months - while the authorities worked out screening methods for liquid explosives.

    Over ten years later, we're still presumably spending gazillions on staff and screening for frisking people for hair-gel and swiss army penknives? Dunno how many bomb plots have been averted but it's done wonders for airside sales of shampoo and conditioner (not that as a baldie, that worries me!)
    Last edited by AlexMac; 24-08-2017 at 10:26 AM. Reason: needed to freshen up my lippie
    • richardw
    • By richardw 24th Aug 17, 11:26 AM
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    • #5
    • 24th Aug 17, 11:26 AM
    • #5
    • 24th Aug 17, 11:26 AM
    ... Dunno how many bomb plots have been averted ...
    Originally posted by AlexMac
    Probably at least one.
    Posts are not advice and must not be relied upon.
    • liviboy
    • By liviboy 24th Aug 17, 1:56 PM
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    liviboy
    • #6
    • 24th Aug 17, 1:56 PM
    • #6
    • 24th Aug 17, 1:56 PM
    Dunno how many bomb plots have been averted but it's done wonders for airside sales of shampoo and conditioner (not that as a baldie, that worries me!)
    Originally posted by AlexMac
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-41026591

    There's one from this year alone...admittedly the Police did muck up a little bit but the airport security screeners themselves did what was meant to happen.

    Aviation Security is simply a deterrent. Nobody will ever know the true impact but you certainly don't hear of aeroplanes being hijacked by pen-knives any more. Whilst security can be an inconvenience to some, at the end of the day it is YOU that is getting on the plane, not the security officers.
  • jamesd
    • #7
    • 24th Aug 17, 2:38 PM
    • #7
    • 24th Aug 17, 2:38 PM
    That one was using a pipe bomb, not liquid explosives, so wasn't blocked by the liquid restrictions. The nitrocellulose that was part of the explosives in that is a very easy chemical synthesis, demonstrated to me in a chemistry lab lecture on explosives, a very important class of chemical products. Not really practical to do it in an plane toilet though, takes too long for that to be viable.

    The liquid blocks are pretty much completely ineffective against a couple of quite well known techniques for hiding things, one commonly used by illegal drug shippers:

    1. rectal concealment. Put whatever you like in say a sealed glass vial that has been cleaned using vapour deposition cleaning to remove any significant residues (but your body will need serious cleaning and new clothes, along with no activity in the place where you handled explosives).

    2. surgically implanted explosives, the boob job or baby device, or just general surgery on humans or other animals. Used to get a bomb close to a senior Arab target. Sometimes called "body packing".
    • liviboy
    • By liviboy 24th Aug 17, 5:27 PM
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    liviboy
    • #8
    • 24th Aug 17, 5:27 PM
    • #8
    • 24th Aug 17, 5:27 PM
    That one was using a pipe bomb, not liquid explosives, so wasn't blocked by the liquid restrictions. The nitrocellulose that was part of the explosives in that is a very easy chemical synthesis, demonstrated to me in a chemistry lab lecture on explosives, a very important class of chemical products. Not really practical to do it in an plane toilet though, takes too long for that to be viable.

    The liquid blocks are pretty much completely ineffective against a couple of quite well known techniques for hiding things, one commonly used by illegal drug shippers:

    1. rectal concealment. Put whatever you like in say a sealed glass vial that has been cleaned using vapour deposition cleaning to remove any significant residues (but your body will need serious cleaning and new clothes, along with no activity in the place where you handled explosives).

    2. surgically implanted explosives, the boob job or baby device, or just general surgery on humans or other animals. Used to get a bomb close to a senior Arab target. Sometimes called "body packing".
    Originally posted by jamesd
    My comment was regarding aviation security in general. The liquids ban/restriction does serve a purpose. Whilst the technology does exist in airports to screen bottles of liquids, at the moment it is not suitable for general use. Currently these machiens are used to check things like medications, baby food and milk, etc. The sealed-bag restrictions allow for much easier and faster liquid checking on a mass scale.

    Security services are more than aware that the next major threat will not be some blokes with balaclavas...that's why the security process that you SEE is a deterrent for the wannabes, mentally unwell, amateur, etc. What is unseen more generally is the background work which try to detect these more meaningful and harder-to-detect threats.
    • leylandsunaddict
    • By leylandsunaddict 24th Aug 17, 6:22 PM
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    leylandsunaddict
    • #9
    • 24th Aug 17, 6:22 PM
    • #9
    • 24th Aug 17, 6:22 PM
    If you're cramming to get a lipstick or eye liner in your bag its already to full to see what's in it anyway. I've always put mine in as a matter of course, no matter which airport.
    • gmarie
    • By gmarie 25th Aug 17, 7:06 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 46 Thanks
    gmarie
    I use an A5 ziplock bag, the thicker plastic folder kinds not the sandwich bag kinds, and I've always been fine with one of them, thankfully.

    I don't put any powders in to save space, as it's my logical understanding that a powder is not a liquid or gel. I do take quite a lot of products in my A5 bag as well, usually shampoo, conditioner, deodorant, liquid foundation, primer, moisturiser, liquid eyeliner, eyeshadow primer, eyebrow gel, mascara, shower gel, lipsticks, dry shampoo & hairspray. My non-liquid products usually consist of pressed powder, loose powder, powder blush & eyeshadows.

    So far nobody has said anything, but I do wear all those products for daily wear so I always assumed that because I looked like the kind of person to pack that many cosmetics, they've used their common sense and just let me through.

    As a tip though, pop into Boots or a department store before you go and ask if they have any fragrance samples. They usually have plenty available to give out, they'll usually be no more than 10ml samples but they're often in a handy mini spritzer bottle, or you can get a packet which you just open and rub on your skin. I usually pack 4/5 of them as one small sample will last a day or two, then they can simply be disposed of. They're really small so can easily be squeezed into your clear bag as well. Saves packing any perfume but allows you to have a nice fragrance for when you're out and about.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 25th Aug 17, 7:31 PM
    • 7,158 Posts
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    DigForVictory
    I have more difficulties getting my knitting aboard. Now I have to choose between the kindle & the phone, it's still more difficult.
    I can manage wooden needles OK but a knitting pattern on a mobile phone screen is Rough.

    I must try the fragrance samples thing - thank you for the heads up!
    • ScarletMarble
    • By ScarletMarble 25th Aug 17, 8:02 PM
    • 7,346 Posts
    • 13,497 Thanks
    ScarletMarble
    As a rule, if you got hold luggage as well. If you don't need it between checking in your case and collecting it from the arrival luggage carousel, don't pack it in your hand luggage.

    I only take my prescribed eyedrops, small tin of Vaseline - as the atmosphere in planes dries my eyes and lips. Also have a bottle of antibacterial hand gel. Use a small clear zipped pencil case, like the one you take to exams.


    Though I'm still am struggling to understand why some people still try to take large bottles of toiletries, drinks etc. It has been twelve years now. I have seen them arguing the toss with security. Then some don't have a bag!

    Why is this?
    • RikM
    • By RikM 26th Aug 17, 7:05 PM
    • 566 Posts
    • 301 Thanks
    RikM
    And apparently, some "travel" hand sanitizers test positive for peroxide (my wife having had her travel bottle of the stuff confiscated)...
    • tindella
    • By tindella 30th Aug 17, 4:52 PM
    • 83 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    tindella
    Lipstick!
    I have been travelling for over 50 years - I frequently use Manchester airport and this June was the first time I was "told off" for having my lipstick in my handbag! It's a solid one - not a gloss - and yet it was classed as a liquid. I did say how long I had been bringing lipstick backwards and forwards and she curtly told me that it's been the rule for 16 years - so I've been getting away with it for 16 years, then! Makes you wonder what else has been to-ing and fro-ing through Manchester Airport.

    Off again soon - and shall put all the makeup in the plastic bag - sigh - it's so much easier to give in than to argue. She's clearly their top "jobsworth!"
    • crowlands
    • By crowlands 6th Sep 17, 8:34 AM
    • 105 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    crowlands
    I had the lipstick conversation at Manchester Airport security a few years ago. We try to fly from Liverpool if possible and they NEVER ask you to put lipstick in your see through bag. I understand that the strict security checks are for everybody's safety but they do all need to sing from the same hymn sheet! Also if you are only travellinfpdpg with hand luggage, for a short break, you cannot put these items in your hold baggage as somebody suggested.
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 6th Sep 17, 10:01 AM
    • 12,480 Posts
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    zagfles
    Yes Manchester is by far the fussiest airport I've been through, both wife and I have been stopped for having solid deodorants in hand luggage, with which we've travelled through countless other airports without a problem.
    • melanzana
    • By melanzana 6th Sep 17, 11:09 AM
    • 2,422 Posts
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    melanzana
    I never question security ever. They have a tough old job.

    Although I have never been pulled up for anything, other than a random scan for drugs or explosives on my hands. That's fine.

    If in doubt, it's a liquid!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 6th Sep 17, 4:44 PM
    • 18,335 Posts
    • 46,959 Thanks
    Pollycat
    MAN airport website states lipstick is included in 'liquids' but gov.uk only mentions lip gloss.

    As a heads-up, MAN airport website states that if you use your own containers, they must be labelled with the volume.
    Hand labelled isn't acceptable apparently.
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