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  • FIRST POST
    • katy123
    • By katy123 8th Aug 17, 12:21 PM
    • 206Posts
    • 6Thanks
    katy123
    Value of estate question
    • #1
    • 8th Aug 17, 12:21 PM
    Value of estate question 8th Aug 17 at 12:21 PM
    Hi

    We've ascertained that the estate is made up of £2.5k bank account and £3.5k of funeral cost. = negative £1.5k However, it has just come to light that there is a second bank account (value unknown). How do we get a value of this bank account (paperless account) so that we can ascertain if

    A. probate is required
    B. chances of solicitor renouncing their executiveship.

    Got a feeling it is the job of the solicitor
Page 1
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 8th Aug 17, 12:32 PM
    • 3,311 Posts
    • 2,663 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #2
    • 8th Aug 17, 12:32 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Aug 17, 12:32 PM
    The solicitor will not want to act if they will not get paid. Someone else can apply for letters of administration with the will annexed. However you may be able to avoid probate if the 2nd bank will release the funds without it. Write to or phone the bank and ask them. They may just accept the death certificate.
    • katy123
    • By katy123 8th Aug 17, 12:57 PM
    • 206 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    katy123
    • #3
    • 8th Aug 17, 12:57 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Aug 17, 12:57 PM
    Thanks, I think I've managed to join all the dots.

    Who can apply for letter of administration? She had no next of kin (all abroad), wasn't married and had no children. Can my grandad or even my dad step in (i'm third generation).

    You've helped me piece it all together. Thank you so much. Given that solcitors do not/will not act as executor for small estates, there's an incentive for beneficiaries to under declare the estate to them in the hope they will renounce their executorship...some people would do that, obviously not us.
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 8th Aug 17, 1:19 PM
    • 3,311 Posts
    • 2,663 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #4
    • 8th Aug 17, 1:19 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Aug 17, 1:19 PM
    I would phone the Probate Office and ask them.


    https://www.lawontheweb.co.uk/personal/probate-offices


    Beware the many pseudo companies pretending to be official.
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 8th Aug 17, 2:43 PM
    • 3,944 Posts
    • 4,295 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    • #5
    • 8th Aug 17, 2:43 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Aug 17, 2:43 PM
    Make an appointment with the second bank go along with your grandfather, taking a copy of the death certificate, and proof of your GFs ID. Most banks will release funds without anything else. In the case of Barclays they will release up to £30,000, so it is highly unlikely that you will have to go anywhere near applying for probate.
    • konark
    • By konark 9th Aug 17, 12:41 AM
    • 918 Posts
    • 715 Thanks
    konark
    • #6
    • 9th Aug 17, 12:41 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Aug 17, 12:41 AM
    Was there a will?
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 9th Aug 17, 5:17 AM
    • 30,291 Posts
    • 18,116 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #7
    • 9th Aug 17, 5:17 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Aug 17, 5:17 AM
    Thanks, I think I've managed to join all the dots.

    Who can apply for letter of administration? She had no next of kin (all abroad), wasn't married and had no children. Can my grandad or even my dad step in (i'm third generation).

    You've helped me piece it all together. Thank you so much. Given that solcitors do not/will not act as executor for small estates, there's an incentive for beneficiaries to under declare the estate to them in the hope they will renounce their executorship...some people would do that, obviously not us.
    Originally posted by katy123
    if administration does end up needing LOA(will attached)

    If granddad is the residual/only beneficiary he can apply as first in line to do so if the named executors step down.

    As you said the preference would be for your dad to do it maybe even yourself,

    Then that can be done using the POA option

    That would be box a6 reason E for executors, will need to check which boxes for application under beneficial interest.
    • katy123
    • By katy123 15th Aug 17, 6:08 PM
    • 206 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    katy123
    • #8
    • 15th Aug 17, 6:08 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Aug 17, 6:08 PM
    This is what we've worked out. Bank will not pay out funds, insist on going to solicitor as they are executor (noticed on will). Will be meeting solicitor soon and ask if they will renounce executorship. Do i get a letter from them or something? Will then try to apply for probate under "apply for letters of administration with the will annexed" with my dad as executor (grandad is the beneficiary but too old to deal with this all).
    • Jenniefour
    • By Jenniefour 15th Aug 17, 6:35 PM
    • 1,219 Posts
    • 1,247 Thanks
    Jenniefour
    • #9
    • 15th Aug 17, 6:35 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Aug 17, 6:35 PM
    Will be meeting solicitor soon and ask if they will renounce executorship.
    Originally posted by katy123
    They won't want to touch it, no money in the estate for them to get paid. Just get them to give it you in writing.
    • sammyjammy
    • By sammyjammy 15th Aug 17, 7:43 PM
    • 4,218 Posts
    • 4,573 Thanks
    sammyjammy
    Whoops misread post
    Last edited by sammyjammy; 15-08-2017 at 7:46 PM.
    "You've been reading SOS when it's just your clock reading 5:05 "
    • Saddness
    • By Saddness 13th Sep 17, 8:34 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Saddness
    Executors vs Beneficiaries
    Hi.

    This is the first time using this forum, so i apologies if I'm doing it wrong.

    I'm just needing some advice, how much power does an executor have over the beneficiary's in decision making.

    There are two of us who are the executors, both of us are representing each others side of the family as my father (now deceased) remarried and so there are step children involved.

    The problem is that there is myself and my sister, who are my fathers blood, and then there are 4 step children from the marriage.

    it feels like the steps are all ganging up on me and manipulating the other executor which is their sister to have things go in their direction.

    how much power by the title of executor do i have?
    • Linton
    • By Linton 13th Sep 17, 10:41 AM
    • 8,495 Posts
    • 8,438 Thanks
    Linton
    Hi.

    This is the first time using this forum, so i apologies if I'm doing it wrong.

    I'm just needing some advice, how much power does an executor have over the beneficiary's in decision making.

    There are two of us who are the executors, both of us are representing each others side of the family as my father (now deceased) remarried and so there are step children involved.

    The problem is that there is myself and my sister, who are my fathers blood, and then there are 4 step children from the marriage.

    it feels like the steps are all ganging up on me and manipulating the other executor which is their sister to have things go in their direction.

    how much power by the title of executor do i have?
    Originally posted by Saddness
    It would be better if you started a fresh thread, otherwise replies to you and the original poster will get confused.

    As an executor you have the power and the duty to implement the terms of the will. No-one else has that. There shouldnt be any other direction in which things can go. Neither of you should be representing anyone.

    Whether you (or your co-executor) can act unilaterally depends on the terms of the will. - if executors cant agree in the final instance it will have to be decided by the courts at great expense to all concerned.

    What are the issues?
    Last edited by Linton; 13-09-2017 at 10:44 AM.
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 13th Sep 17, 12:51 PM
    • 3,311 Posts
    • 2,663 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    Hi.

    This is the first time using this forum, so i apologies if I'm doing it wrong.

    I'm just needing some advice, how much power does an executor have over the beneficiary's in decision making.

    There are two of us who are the executors, both of us are representing each others side of the family as my father (now deceased) remarried and so there are step children involved.

    The problem is that there is myself and my sister, who are my fathers blood, and then there are 4 step children from the marriage.

    it feels like the steps are all ganging up on me and manipulating the other executor which is their sister to have things go in their direction.

    how much power by the title of executor do i have?
    Originally posted by Saddness
    The executors are the ones who make the decisions. Beneficiaries have no say in the matter. If they don't like it they can ultimately take the executors to court. The executors are legally obliged to act impartially. Your sister needs to be told that very firmly.
    • Alter ego
    • By Alter ego 13th Sep 17, 12:54 PM
    • 2,165 Posts
    • 2,081 Thanks
    Alter ego
    Thanks, I think I've managed to join all the dots.

    Who can apply for letter of administration? She had no next of kin (all abroad), wasn't married and had no children. Can my grandad or even my dad step in (i'm third generation).

    You've helped me piece it all together. Thank you so much. Given that solcitors do not/will not act as executor for small estates, there's an incentive for beneficiaries to under declare the estate to them in the hope they will renounce their executorship...some people would do that, obviously not us.
    Originally posted by katy123
    You have said no next of kin. Then all abroad. Being abroad does not change their relationship to the deceased. If they are known they must be contacted.
    Ignore me if you like, it's not the real me anyway.
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