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  • FIRST POST
    • redfox
    • By redfox 1st Aug 17, 7:23 AM
    • 12,204Posts
    • 34,917Thanks
    redfox
    British Gas to increase electricity prices by 12.5% in Sept
    • #1
    • 1st Aug 17, 7:23 AM
    British Gas to increase electricity prices by 12.5% in Sept 1st Aug 17 at 7:23 AM
    It's just been announced that British Gas are to increase electricity prices by 12.5% in September.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40787555
    I'm a Board Guide on the Quick Grabbit, Food Shopping & Groceries, Shop but don't drop, Loans and Cutting Tax boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and I can move and merge threads there. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this) Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

Page 2
    • dogshome
    • By dogshome 1st Aug 17, 3:37 PM
    • 2,893 Posts
    • 1,468 Thanks
    dogshome
    Interesting that the BG spokesman when being interviewed on BBC news this morning, said not once but twice, that Elec wholesale prices had not gone up since 2013 !
    • michaels
    • By michaels 1st Aug 17, 3:42 PM
    • 19,264 Posts
    • 88,338 Thanks
    michaels
    Is the price rise as a result of:
    - BG increasing profit margins,
    - BG failing to control costs,
    - rising wholsesale prices,
    - cost increases in distribution from National Grid monopoly,
    - govt carbon pricing and supplier efficiency commitments,
    - feed in tariffs and strike prices such as the Hinckley C fiasco, or
    - cross-subsidy of vulnerable customers
    Cool heads and compromise
    • gsmlnx
    • By gsmlnx 1st Aug 17, 4:14 PM
    • 687 Posts
    • 559 Thanks
    gsmlnx
    Correct, but I meant if I hadn't switched last week, the same fix now would cost 13.5% more as they have today withdrawn the 'HomeEnergy Fixed Aug 2019' product, and replaced it with the 'HomeEnergy Secure Aug 2019' product...
    Originally posted by sd99
    Ah that makes more sense.
    Have to say for my usage/area I rarely find any BG tariffs listed in the top 20 cheapest tariffs on CEC so the exact tariffs they offer escape me.
    • Hengus
    • By Hengus 4th Aug 17, 2:16 PM
    • 4,203 Posts
    • 2,450 Thanks
    Hengus
    SO who do you believe - BG or the Govt?
    quote:

    The cost of green taxes on energy bills will more than treble over the next five years, the official economic forecaster has said.

    The Office for Budget Responsibility said that cost of the subsidies, which are levied on household and business energy bills, is expected to rise from £4.6billion in 2015-16 to £13.5billion in 2021-22.

    It comes after British Gas claimed that green taxes will cost households £150 from next year as it blamed the Government for a huge rise in electricity bills.

    British Gas forecast that the cost of the subsidies, which are used to fund renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar, will hit £149 next year having risen by by two-thirds since 2014.

    It announced that 3million of its customers on a dual fuel standard variable tariff will see their bill rise by an average of £76 to £1,120.

    The figures will add to mounting tensions in the Conservative Party over the current push for renewable energy.

    Quote

    Source: Daily Telegraph et al- 2 Aug 17
    • superkoopauk
    • By superkoopauk 4th Aug 17, 11:01 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    superkoopauk
    One thing that does not appear to be reported in the media is the removal of the BG £15 annual dual fuel discount. This means dual fuel customers will be paying £7.50 extra a year for both their electric and gas. So the increase in electricity will be greater than the reported 12.5% for dual fuel customers and they will be getting an increase on their gas as well!
    • lstar337
    • By lstar337 7th Aug 17, 9:34 AM
    • 3,209 Posts
    • 1,716 Thanks
    lstar337
    quote:

    The cost of green taxes on energy bills will more than treble over the next five years, the official economic forecaster has said.

    The Office for Budget Responsibility said that cost of the subsidies, which are levied on household and business energy bills, is expected to rise from £4.6billion in 2015-16 to £13.5billion in 2021-22.

    It comes after British Gas claimed that green taxes will cost households £150 from next year as it blamed the Government for a huge rise in electricity bills.

    British Gas forecast that the cost of the subsidies, which are used to fund renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar, will hit £149 next year having risen by by two-thirds since 2014.

    It announced that 3million of its customers on a dual fuel standard variable tariff will see their bill rise by an average of £76 to £1,120.

    The figures will add to mounting tensions in the Conservative Party over the current push for renewable energy.

    Quote

    Source: Daily Telegraph et al- 2 Aug 17
    Originally posted by Hengus
    But why are green taxes increasing when green energy sources are requiring less and less subsidy in order to be viable?

    Many green sources (solar on/off shore wind) are now coming in at better prices than HPC ever will.

    So where is the money going?

    Note the source, The Telegraph. Known to hate all forms of green energy.
    Last edited by lstar337; 07-08-2017 at 9:36 AM.
    • ASavvyBuyer
    • By ASavvyBuyer 7th Aug 17, 10:04 AM
    • 506 Posts
    • 1,303 Thanks
    ASavvyBuyer
    But why are green taxes increasing when green energy sources are requiring less and less subsidy in order to be viable?

    Many green sources (solar on/off shore wind) are now coming in at better prices than HPC ever will.

    So where is the money going?

    Note the source, The Telegraph. Known to hate all forms of green energy.
    Originally posted by lstar337
    It appears that what are being called "Green Taxes" are in fact for other things. The majority being for (not so) SMART meters (about £40 per year), support funds for companies going bust, Warm Home payments, etc. Some may even be for paying for the clean up of nuclear & fossil fuels.

    In fact it looks like less than £30/year of this "Green Tax" is actually for helping to support solar & wind generation, and that is actually reducing as costs come down.
    Rhondda Cynon Taf, 4kWp, W roof, 30° pitch, 16 x 8.33 Eternity 250w E+10 panels, Solar Edge SE4000-16A Inverter + P300 Optimisers & REUK Diverter
    + Toshiba RAS-10G2KVP-E Ultra High Efficiency Air Conditioner/Heat Pump
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 7th Aug 17, 11:54 AM
    • 26,823 Posts
    • 13,003 Thanks
    Cardew
    But why are green taxes increasing when green energy sources are requiring less and less subsidy in order to be viable?
    Originally posted by lstar337
    New installations might attract lower subsidies - but they are still getting subsidies.

    However the £millions/billions already being paid out in subsidies is index linked for a 25 or 20 year term. These subsidies are paid for by all electricity customers.

    For instance the early adopters of solar PV on domestic properties have their subsidies index linked for 25 years and are now getting over 50p for every kWh(unit) they generate; and to add insult to injury they don't have to export a single kWh if they can use it in their property.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 7th Aug 17, 12:50 PM
    • 5,791 Posts
    • 9,841 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    New installations might attract lower subsidies - but they are still getting subsidies.

    However the £millions/billions already being paid out in subsidies is index linked for a 25 or 20 year term. These subsidies are paid for by all electricity customers.

    For instance the early adopters of solar PV on domestic properties have their subsidies index linked for 25 years and are now getting over 50p for every kWh(unit) they generate; and to add insult to injury they don't have to export a single kWh if they can use it in their property.
    Originally posted by Cardew
    Cheer up, it could be worse, we could be financing new generation that doesn't start till the late 2020's, on a high 35yr subsidy, with payments going to France and China, and despite having subsidised the technology for 60yrs already, and at a time when the US is cancelling builds because of the high cost impact on customers ...... or is this another discussion thread where we're not allowed to mention your beloved nuclear?
    Just 'call me Mart'. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 7th Aug 17, 1:06 PM
    • 26,823 Posts
    • 13,003 Thanks
    Cardew
    .. or is this another discussion thread where we're not allowed to mention your beloved nuclear?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Not 'beloved nuclear' - I simply prefer something that can generate at night, and when the sun isn't shining and the wind not blowing.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 7th Aug 17, 3:37 PM
    • 5,791 Posts
    • 9,841 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    Not 'beloved nuclear' - I simply prefer something that can generate at night, and when the sun isn't shining and the wind not blowing.
    Originally posted by Cardew
    And you are entitled to your opinion, but I prefer RE as it needs far less subsidies than nuclear, after all .....

    These subsidies are paid for by all electricity customers.
    ...... and after just 10yrs of support the RE subsidies are falling rapidly, with 15yr off-shore wind contracts (this year) expected to join PV and on-shore wind at lower costs than the 35yr new nuclear subsidies. Even more impressive when you consider that nuclear has already been subsidised for 60yrs.

    BTW, you also said:

    and to add insult to injury they don't have to export a single kWh if they can use it in their property.
    Originally posted by Cardew
    This is just to remind you that whether the electricity is consumed on site, or exported, the effect on the grid is the same.

    Eg if I generate 1kWh and export it to my neighbours, then that will displace 1.08kWh of leccy that the National Grid needs from fossil fuel generation.

    However, if I generate 1kWh and consume it, then that will displace 1.08kWh of leccy that the National Grid needs from fossil fuel generation.

    So the result is the same, and your point serves no purpose other than to mislead. I could have said 'accidentally' mislead, but since you are aware of this, as you've been corrected dozens of times over the last 5yrs, it seems silly to continue the game of whether you are deliberately trying to post false information.

    [Note - UK Distribution losses are estimated at being approx 8%]

    BTW2 - I know I've asked this before, but you've never answered me - why do you run a campaign against the only energy subsidy that goes to your neighbours, but don't campaign against all the other subsidies (direct or indirect), none of which go to your neighbours? Shirley, a rational person would go after nuclear subsidies first?
    Just 'call me Mart'. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Airmover
    • By Airmover 7th Aug 17, 3:56 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Airmover
    MSE Cost calculator for dual fuel
    I am on Collective Fix Oct 2017 for Gas & Elec with British Gas..
    I am facing a 33% increase on my Direct Debit when this tariff ends.
    I have fed accurate kWh usage figures into MSE comparison caclulator in order to check alternative suppliers.
    The MSE results show that I should be paying £107 per month compared to the actual £128.
    When the tariff ends in October, British Gas say that I will be paying £170 p.m. but MSE say £161. Why the discrepancies when the British Gas kWh usage figures have been fed into the MSE calculator?
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