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  • FIRST POST
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 21st Jul 17, 10:25 PM
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    zaksmum
    dog burps loudly after eating
    • #1
    • 21st Jul 17, 10:25 PM
    dog burps loudly after eating 21st Jul 17 at 10:25 PM
    My dog has always been a reluctant eater, he is 9 now and seems almost afraid to eat. He trembles and then slinks away when I put his food out and only with persuasion will he eat it.

    He must be eating enough as he's a normal weight but the palaver getting him to eat is ridiculous!

    Recently he has been burping loudly after meals and I'm wondering if this might indicate any kind of gastric problem which may possibly cause the reluctance to eat.

    He's a whippet/labrador first cross and still very active and agile when outdoors...but seems miserable when indoors despite having constant company and loads of cuddles and reassurance.

    The vet has pronounced him fit and healthy.
Page 2
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 28th Jul 17, 6:04 PM
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    zaksmum
    He will take food from my hand but it's still a battle. He turns his head away and starts trembling as if he thinks I'm trying to poison him. Unless it's a bit of chicken or steak of course, he wolfs that!

    He's the same with everyone no matter who feeds him. He's loved and praised all the time,always has companionship and exercise.

    If I look after my son's dog, he'll eat because he knows the other dog will eat it if he leaves it.

    And he never ever, even on a good day, finishes everything in his bowl!
    • candygirl
    • By candygirl 28th Jul 17, 6:11 PM
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    candygirl
    This sounds like anxiety to me , and it's amazing he is part lab, as all mine were canine dustbins
    Think you need a second vet's opinion though x
    "You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf"

    (Kabat-Zinn 2004)
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 30th Jul 17, 6:15 PM
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    zaksmum
    This sounds like anxiety to me , and it's amazing he is part lab, as all mine were canine dustbins
    Think you need a second vet's opinion though x
    Originally posted by candygirl
    It definitely is anxiety. He's half whippet, to balance out the labrador greedy guts!

    He'll start trembling the minute I say "do you want your dinner?"

    Then sit salivating, staring at his food, till he gets up and flees looking for somewhere to hide.

    It's like he's frightened to eat.

    I'm throwing his food out constantly and it drives me mad.
    • Helen2k8
    • By Helen2k8 1st Aug 17, 10:09 PM
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    Helen2k8
    If a vet said my 9 year old dog wasn't worth the effort, I'd find a new vet. Unless, perhaps, I had a great dane or something similarly huge and short lived.

    It sounds to me (disclaimer - not a vet!) like there is or has been some sort of stomach upset that is now either causing physical or psychological issues.
    You say it started at 3 years old, did anything in particular happen? Chewed a bottle of household cleaner, or got a stick stuck in their mouth, or.... some sort of internal injury?

    Trying the pets at home raw food sounds worth a go, and I would also change your routine. Don't ask about "dinner", don't mention the D word! Perhaps just say "Time for food" or something instead, put down the bowl of food, and walk away. See what happens then.
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 14th Aug 17, 8:27 PM
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    zaksmum
    If a vet said my 9 year old dog wasn't worth the effort, I'd find a new vet. Unless, perhaps, I had a great dane or something similarly huge and short lived.

    It sounds to me (disclaimer - not a vet!) like there is or has been some sort of stomach upset that is now either causing physical or psychological issues.
    You say it started at 3 years old, did anything in particular happen? Chewed a bottle of household cleaner, or got a stick stuck in their mouth, or.... some sort of internal injury?

    Trying the pets at home raw food sounds worth a go, and I would also change your routine. Don't ask about "dinner", don't mention the D word! Perhaps just say "Time for food" or something instead, put down the bowl of food, and walk away. See what happens then.
    Originally posted by Helen2k8
    I agree though with the vet that it's not a physical problem, but anxiety. I don't know why he's anxious - he has no need to be.

    But if the smoke alarm battery needs changing, and beeps, he's a nervous wreck, shaking and panting, till the noise is stopped.

    Not remotely bothered by things like fireworks though.

    When he finds food in the street, like an old KFC bone, he'll freeze and stare at me as if to say, "can I eat it?". Of course I tell him to leave it, and he does, but then if someone offers him a bit of their sausage roll, he'll do the same thing, and scoff it only if I say "go on then".

    Sometimes he does that with his food, as if needing my permission to eat.

    I say "go on then" and he will sometimes start to eat, then change his mind and walk away. Unless it's steak trimmings or bits of chicken!

    He's a very much loved dog, but definitely a very complicated one!
    • helcat26
    • By helcat26 16th Aug 17, 4:18 PM
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    helcat26
    Really I hope you sort this.
    But I cannot help it this post cries out for the classic response to" it was the dog farting not me!"
    on that subject dogs always seem to want what I am eating. Could you share food to get him more confident?
    • Nebulous2
    • By Nebulous2 19th Aug 17, 5:10 PM
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    Nebulous2
    Do you need to take the food away at all?

    We feed our dog on demand. He lives on dried food and basically if his bowl is looking empty or nearly empty whoever is passing will wash it out and top it up.

    That means there is absolutely no dramas about food and he eats when he wants. Sometimes he eats after his morning walk, sometimes he doesn't eat until tea time. Quite regularly he will eat after we have gone to bed.

    It wouldn't work for every dog - particularly where there are concerns about them putting on weight, but it works for us.
    • Fen1
    • By Fen1 19th Aug 17, 6:34 PM
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    Fen1
    When you feed him chicken or steak, is it always from your hand? Does he eat the steak if it is in his bowl?

    Have you tried tinned food n your hand? Gross, I know.

    Perhaps he just doesn't like commercial food? Given that he scoffs real meat he knows that he's hungry and he knows what he likes.
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 29th Aug 17, 6:12 PM
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    zaksmum
    Do you need to take the food away at all?

    We feed our dog on demand. He lives on dried food and basically if his bowl is looking empty or nearly empty whoever is passing will wash it out and top it up.

    That means there is absolutely no dramas about food and he eats when he wants. Sometimes he eats after his morning walk, sometimes he doesn't eat until tea time. Quite regularly he will eat after we have gone to bed.

    It wouldn't work for every dog - particularly where there are concerns about them putting on weight, but it works for us.
    Originally posted by Nebulous2
    The problem with that is, in this weather, the food will sit untouched in his bowl all day, and because there are doors and windows open, flies come in, and go to the food in the bowl.

    So then I have to throw the food away. I have known him not to eat anything at all for two whole days, at which point I'm desperate for him to eat ANYTHING at all, so that's where the bits of chicken etc. come in.
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 29th Aug 17, 6:15 PM
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    zaksmum
    When you feed him chicken or steak, is it always from your hand? Does he eat the steak if it is in his bowl?

    Have you tried tinned food n your hand? Gross, I know.

    Perhaps he just doesn't like commercial food? Given that he scoffs real meat he knows that he's hungry and he knows what he likes.
    Originally posted by Fen1
    Yes I have given tinned food as well as kibble from my hand.

    He will turn his head away more often than not, and walk away.

    Sometimes he'll take the food in his mouth then spit it back out.

    The bits of chicken or steak will be wolfed down even from his bowl.

    It's only if there's another dog around that he'll eat whatever I give him.
    • Fen1
    • By Fen1 9th Sep 17, 9:48 AM
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    Fen1
    If he likes meat, why not feed him meat. He will be happier, and you'll save money by not having to bin tinned food all the time.

    There's lots of information out there on meat and raw-feeding. Does he like vegetables? Some dogs go mad for a bit of carrot.
    • candygirl
    • By candygirl 9th Sep 17, 2:48 PM
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    candygirl
    If he likes meat, why not feed him meat. He will be happier, and you'll save money by not having to bin tinned food all the time.

    There's lots of information out there on meat and raw-feeding. Does he like vegetables? Some dogs go mad for a bit of carrot.
    Originally posted by Fen1
    My two have a carrot each every day, n both have fantastic teeth, eveń though Buddy's 14.5 now
    "You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf"

    (Kabat-Zinn 2004)
    • Soot2006
    • By Soot2006 9th Sep 17, 4:43 PM
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    Soot2006
    At his age, stick him on a prey model raw diet. You're not worrying about growth plates or hormone changes, so you can't really get it wrong as long it's sort of balances out over the month.

    I would give him raw meat. Chicken wings, heart (muscle), carcasses, tripe, ribs (beef and lamb) ... or store bought but that's more expensive. Get him eating; see what he actually likes; then worry about balancing it out.

    For info, my dog won't eat BARF, only meaty bones and prey model ... She won't eat vegetables or fruit unless fresh from the garden; she won't eat rice, grain or potato (nor should she, but she will reject a treat with any of those ingredients) ... But give her a rabbit or a chicken and it's gone in minutes. She can eat a bucket of fresh mackerel like inhaling spaghetti lol ... My new puppy (terrier) gets a more balanced diet as he is younger, but his favourite part is the meat!
    • robotrobo
    • By robotrobo 9th Sep 17, 4:48 PM
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    robotrobo
    My dog has always been a reluctant eater, he is 9 now and seems almost afraid to eat. He trembles and then slinks away when I put his food out and only with persuasion will he eat it.

    He must be eating enough as he's a normal weight but the palaver getting him to eat is ridiculous!

    Recently he has been burping loudly after meals and I'm wondering if this might indicate any kind of gastric problem which may possibly cause the reluctance to eat.

    He's a whippet/labrador first cross and still very active and agile when outdoors...but seems miserable when indoors despite having constant company and loads of cuddles and reassurance.

    The vet has pronounced him fit and healthy.
    Originally posted by zaksmum



    dog burps loudly after eating

    IF i was you i would seek a divorce from him
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 17th Sep 17, 3:27 PM
    • 5,411 Posts
    • 7,307 Thanks
    zaksmum
    dog burps loudly after eating

    IF i was you i would seek a divorce from him
    Originally posted by robotrobo
    sometimes I wish I could!
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 18th Sep 17, 12:07 PM
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    Silvertabby
    dog burps loudly after eating
    Count your blessings. Our elderly cat's farts can clear a room (but we still love her!)
    • annandale
    • By annandale 18th Sep 17, 1:15 PM
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    annandale
    Your dog is nine. Hes got anxiety issues, clearly. Which haven't been addressed and your concern is burping.

    Feeding him raw meat won't take his anxiety away.
    • zaksmum
    • By zaksmum 1st Oct 17, 6:53 PM
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    zaksmum
    Your dog is nine. Hes got anxiety issues, clearly. Which haven't been addressed and your concern is burping.

    Feeding him raw meat won't take his anxiety away.
    Originally posted by annandale
    My concern is not that my dog is burping - it's just a thought that the burping might have shed some light on why he doesn't want to eat.

    I've looked into every possible reason for this, including God knows how many trips to the vet, and every health related reason has been ruled out. As I've said, he will practically have my hand off if I feed him steak trimmings or chicken, certainly not a trace of anxiety then!

    So the vet has concluded that my dog will eat what and when he wants to eat and to continue to reassure him and keep him as calm as possible...so that's what I'll do.

    Apart from the reluctance to eat, my dog is happy and healthy, so I'll just persevere and hope that he might just have an appetite for normal dog food one of these days.
    • jec123
    • By jec123 12th Oct 17, 2:54 PM
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    jec123
    We're having exactly the same issues with our 2 year old dog...although at the moment it comes and goes... she's been eating fine all summer, then a few weeks ago she just started turning her nose up at her food.

    She looks at it, often will lick her lips and drool, but then will sadly turn and walk away. Sometimes you can hand feed her, but often that seems to upset her more.

    Give her a treat though, or knob of cheese and she'll wolf that down!

    Been to the vets numerous times and they've ruled out anything else and said not to worry, but it's hard to see her not eating.

    When she does eat she will often burp too - I don't think it's that she's eating too quickly. I wonder whether it could be gastric reflux and that is putting them off their food?
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 12th Oct 17, 3:47 PM
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    sheramber
    You could try feeding some tree bark powder. It soothes the digestion https://www.dorwest.com/product/tree-barks-powder-for-dogs-and-cats/

    Many years ago, before food intolerance was recognised, I had a dog who ate very little e'g as a pup
    she ate one wheetabix a day, or one egg scrambled a day.

    She didn't eat dog food until she was 10 months old and that was done by sharing her food with my other dog- one bit to her, one to the other dog alternatively.

    She was healthy looking, shiny coat and bags of energy. Everything was done at a run.

    The vet said she just ate enough for her needs and no extra. She was all bone and muscle. There wasn't an ounce of fat on her.

    But then she started scratching day and night.

    I was suspicious that it was food caused . My vet dismissed that saying it was very rarely a cause but I trusted my ut feeling and started feeding her boiled chicken and rice. In three days the scratching was much less and then stopped.

    By trial and error I found out it was wheat gluten that caused the problem.

    At that time all dog food contained wheat so now I realised why she had a problem eating.

    I continued feeding her boiled chicken or fish and rice and she started to enjoy her food.

    Now there are a variety of foods available but dogs can be sensitive to any ingredient , beef, chicken, rice, wheat etc or the many additives included.
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