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  • FIRST POST
    • BlessedNotStressed
    • By BlessedNotStressed 21st Jul 17, 9:26 PM
    • 24Posts
    • 110Thanks
    BlessedNotStressed
    Seriously SCARY situation
    • #1
    • 21st Jul 17, 9:26 PM
    Seriously SCARY situation 21st Jul 17 at 9:26 PM
    Needing some urgent advice!
    My husband and I purchased our first home - we completed in February. Everything was going swimmingly and we were settling in well.........until 7am today! A strange man randomly strolled into our house, and what ensued was a hysterical fit of screaming, shouting and aggression. This guy had a key to our house! After we had all (finally!) calmed down, we asked the man in question why he had a key to our house, and what the hell was he playing at strolling in unannounced?! He claims that the house belongs to him - he seems to think that he bought it with his ex, but he went to work in Dubai for 18 months without finalising any divorce. He is insisting that he did not consent (or, therefore,sign) any paperwork permitting the sale of the property!!
    My husband and I are understandably nervous now. The man said he'd be speaking to his solicitor and the police. Where do we stand? Will the house purchase be voided? Will we be forced to leave and still pay the mortgage? Can't even get hold of my own solicitor until Monday now.
    Last edited by BlessedNotStressed; 21-07-2017 at 11:36 PM.
Page 9
    • BlessedNotStressed
    • By BlessedNotStressed 1st Aug 17, 9:28 PM
    • 24 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    BlessedNotStressed
    The man turned up at our house tonight asking to check the attic. However, he was very calm & polite - I think he understands that we are innocent victims caught in the crossfire! I allowed him to check the attic but didn't tell him about the boxes. He was too busy hurling obscenities about his ex - he seems to be feeling very vengeful because he was more concerned about getting her to court than getting his money from the sale
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 1st Aug 17, 9:30 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    Not a chance! Really?!

    I mean I know people like this exist, but come on
    • Lysimache
    • By Lysimache 1st Aug 17, 9:36 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Lysimache
    I think at some point, you should tell him about the charity shop so he can go there. You needn't tell him that the war collection has gone - just point him in the direction of the charity shop. Even getting some of his stuff back could mean a lot to him once the furore of legal stuff has gone down.

    You did nothing wrong re taking boxes to charity shop as you did ask the conveyancers/estate agents earlier. It would be seriously a nice act of kindness.
    • Zeni
    • By Zeni 1st Aug 17, 11:05 PM
    • 269 Posts
    • 597 Thanks
    Zeni
    Wow, can't make this kind of thing up! I would tell your solicitors/his about the boxes and get them to pass it on, I don't think its your responsibility to say it to him face to face as you didn't do anything wrong and shouldn't have to deal with any fallout from that. What a horrible situation to be stuck in!!

    (Me and my OH used a online conveyancer and its made me realise how easy it could of been for me, I was the one who talked to them on the phone and via email and gave the go ahead for exchange so really they never talked to my OH only had his ID and signatures on docs that I had sent)
    Swagbuckling since Aug 2016 - Earnings so far.. £55.
    • cjmillsnun
    • By cjmillsnun 1st Aug 17, 11:10 PM
    • 178 Posts
    • 113 Thanks
    cjmillsnun
    Something else.. If he comes back, you need to not let him in and advise that any correspondence should be via your solicitor.

    He cannot keep turning up at your house. Technically that's harassment.
    • Muttleythefrog
    • By Muttleythefrog 1st Aug 17, 11:25 PM
    • 10,496 Posts
    • 19,477 Thanks
    Muttleythefrog
    Yeah agree with the above.. bit surprised he turned up again to be honest.... but would point him to official channels if he tries again. His story with that house lies elsewhere now.
    "Do not attribute to conspiracy what can adequately be explained by incompetence" - rogerblack
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 2nd Aug 17, 7:39 AM
    • 13,422 Posts
    • 36,577 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Something else.. If he comes back, you need to not let him in and advise that any correspondence should be via your solicitor.

    He cannot keep turning up at your house. Technically that's harassment.
    Originally posted by cjmillsnun
    Agree that you'd better not let him in if he turns up again.

    The facts in law are that he is no longer part-owner of the house. But he never sold his share (ie having been tricked out of it by his ex) and is still part-owner iyswim and so if he turns up with a couple of drinks inside him reinforcing the "actual facts" as compared to the "legal facts" then you could have a problem with him losing his temper.

    He knows logically it's your house now and the law would agree with you - but emotionally it is still part his iyswim and a couple of drinks later that is what he might go with.
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 2nd Aug 17, 9:59 AM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    Something else.. If he comes back, you need to not let him in and advise that any correspondence should be via your solicitor.

    He cannot keep turning up at your house. Technically that's harassment.
    Originally posted by cjmillsnun
    It's only harassment if it's conduct which the OP doesn't enable.
    • Lysimache
    • By Lysimache 5th Aug 17, 11:34 AM
    • 23 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Lysimache
    Yeah, don't talk to him, but do tell their solicitor about the local shop that you gave the goods too. I think that's important.
    • BlessedNotStressed
    • By BlessedNotStressed 7th Aug 17, 1:46 PM
    • 24 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    BlessedNotStressed
    The latest instalment in this ridiculous saga: I hav fessed up about the attic boxes and charity shop etc. He was raging and threatening to sue us apparently - my solicitor doesn't think he'll have a leg to standing on and, frankly, my sympathy well is running dry for this knuckle-dragging Rambo wannabe. I am considering suing someone for embroiling my family and I into this stressful and upsetting situation. Does anyone know whether we'd have any form of redress against the female owner or her solicitors?
    Last edited by BlessedNotStressed; 07-08-2017 at 2:26 PM.
    • Ithaca
    • By Ithaca 7th Aug 17, 2:08 PM
    • 213 Posts
    • 229 Thanks
    Ithaca
    Have you had a chat with your local Neighbourhood Policing team? This guy sounds like he has anger issues and doesn't sound like the sort of person to stay away even after he's been asked. The last thing you need is him either continuing to take it out on your (blameless) family, or thinking "if I can't have the house no-one else can" and doing something daft.

    It might be worth a quick word with your local police just to let them know the situation so that if you do ever need to give them a call (fingers crossed it'll never come to it) at least they'll be forewarned and you won't get into a protracted discussion with the responding officers about whether you should be in the house or not.

    If he's known to the police already they may also have a proactive word with him.

    Your frustration and anger are understandable, but I would focus on getting this whole thing behind you rather than tying yourself up for months in legal disputes. I can't see how he'd get anywhere with a claim over the stuff in the loft - he'd have to prove (1) the value of the items left in the boxes and (2) that you acted unreasonably in getting rid of them, neither of which seem remotely likely. People can sue for any reason but that's not the same thing as winning!
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 7th Aug 17, 2:10 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    The latest instalment in this ridiculous saga: I hav fessed up about the attic boxes and charity shop etc. He was raging and tretanig to sue us apparently - my solicitor doesn't think he'll have a leg to standing on and, frankly, my sympathy well is running dry for this knuckle-dragging Rambo wannabe. I am considering suing someone for embroiling my family and I into this stressful and upsetting situation. Does anyone know whether we'd have any form of redress against the female owner or her solicitors?
    Originally posted by BlessedNotStressed


    No, because the situation is of your own making.....
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 7th Aug 17, 2:16 PM
    • 1,615 Posts
    • 4,358 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    my sympathy well is running dry for this knuckle-dragging Rambo wannabe.
    Originally posted by BlessedNotStressed
    You mean the person who's had his property stolen, and been lied to?

    If this is even real, which I'm pretty sure its not, why arne't you just shutting your door and leaving it to be sorted out by the relevant parties?
    • leslieknope
    • By leslieknope 7th Aug 17, 2:22 PM
    • 247 Posts
    • 339 Thanks
    leslieknope
    No, because the situation is of your own making.....
    Originally posted by Guest101
    how is it OP's fault when she has asked if they could claim any recompense from the female owner and solicitors - who are the ones who created this mess? obviously she should not have continued to engage with the male ex, but this whole thing was started by the fraudulant sale which was not OP's fault. i think they would be due at least an apology for having some stranger wander into their house!
    CCCC #33: £42/£240
    DFW: £4355/£4405
    • BlessedNotStressed
    • By BlessedNotStressed 7th Aug 17, 2:29 PM
    • 24 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    BlessedNotStressed
    I haven't seen the man himself since last time - we are communicating through his solicitor. He can retrieve most of the stuff from the charity shop himself, so no real damage done there (except the war collection - but the charity shop people may be able to track them down for him). As far as I know, the female owner has the sale money in an account for him as well.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 7th Aug 17, 2:31 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    how is it OP's fault when she has asked if they could claim any recompense from the female owner and solicitors - who are the ones who created this mess? obviously she should not have continued to engage with the male ex, but this whole thing was started by the fraudulant sale which was not OP's fault. i think they would be due at least an apology for having some stranger wander into their house!
    Originally posted by leslieknope


    Because the OP is enabling this situation to go on. By tracking down items from a charity shop. By allowing him to check the attic. By continuously engaging in what is a dispute between exes.


    A court cannot order an apology.
    • leslieknope
    • By leslieknope 7th Aug 17, 3:10 PM
    • 247 Posts
    • 339 Thanks
    leslieknope
    i'm aware that a court can't order an apology. but this has been a very stressful situation for both parties so i don't see why they wouldn't be entitled to some form of compensation as this situation wasn't declared to OP and i'm sure that something like this should have been declared during the purchase? unless she signed the papers fraudulently, in which case there is a fraud case against her
    CCCC #33: £42/£240
    DFW: £4355/£4405
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Aug 17, 3:20 PM
    • 13,422 Posts
    • 36,577 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    No, because the situation is of your own making.....
    Originally posted by Guest101
    Hardly!

    As far as OP knew they were just buying a perfectly standard house in a perfectly standard way.

    I'd also disagree with other post about regarding this guy as someone with "anger issues" or any other issues. It's not abnormal behaviour to get upset if someone sells something you own/part-own over your head and you had no idea. It's entirely understandable.

    The "piggy in the middle/cause of all this" is the other part-owner.
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 7th Aug 17, 3:26 PM
    • 9,624 Posts
    • 7,616 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Unless there is a provable loss by the OP (which there appears not to be), she cannot use MCOL and would have to sue for damages in a higher court which would cost far, far more than anything she might be awarded.
    • gax23
    • By gax23 11th Sep 17, 2:18 PM
    • 194 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    gax23
    How have things played out, BlessedNotStressed? Been thinking of you!
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