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  • FIRST POST
    • book12
    • By book12 17th Jul 17, 2:08 PM
    • 2,513Posts
    • 554Thanks
    book12
    Can't connect to wifi in hotels
    • #1
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:08 PM
    Can't connect to wifi in hotels 17th Jul 17 at 2:08 PM
    Whenever I use my phone to connect to wi-fi In Holiday Inn, Travel Lodge, or a Premier Inn, Google Chrome blocks it which means I can't use the internet. Same for other browsers on my phone.

    Any way to resolve the issue?
Page 1
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 17th Jul 17, 2:35 PM
    • 4,903 Posts
    • 9,597 Thanks
    I have spoken
    • #2
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:35 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:35 PM
    Stay at home?

    But seriously, what model phone do you have?
    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 17th Jul 17, 2:37 PM
    • 9,488 Posts
    • 3,874 Thanks
    JJ Egan
    • #3
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:37 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:37 PM
    Remove Google Chrome .
    But i don't understand other browsers not working if chrome is the culprit .
    • giraffe69
    • By giraffe69 17th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    • 2,139 Posts
    • 1,870 Thanks
    giraffe69
    • #4
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    My phone connects when going to these hotels without problem. I think you need to give us more detail about what the problem is.
    • Frozen_up_north
    • By Frozen_up_north 17th Jul 17, 3:24 PM
    • 1,091 Posts
    • 481 Thanks
    Frozen_up_north
    • #5
    • 17th Jul 17, 3:24 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Jul 17, 3:24 PM
    Is this due to security settings on your phone? Public and free WiFi (those shown without a padlock symbol) is not secure. Everything routed through them can potentially be intercepted.

    I occasionally use free WiFi in pubs and bars, but always use a VPN to secure the connection.

    I'm sure if you ask there will be others able to connect, compare settings.

    Don't forget to get a VPN, I use a paid service by CyberGhost, but there are others too.
    • ukjoel
    • By ukjoel 17th Jul 17, 6:06 PM
    • 1,383 Posts
    • 1,248 Thanks
    ukjoel
    • #6
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:06 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:06 PM
    I had the same issue with chrome.
    I use other browsers and it works fine.
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 17th Jul 17, 6:07 PM
    • 4,416 Posts
    • 3,298 Thanks
    glentoran99
    • #7
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:07 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:07 PM
    Is this due to security settings on your phone? Public and free WiFi (those shown without a padlock symbol) is not secure. Everything routed through them can potentially be intercepted.

    I occasionally use free WiFi in pubs and bars, but always use a VPN to secure the connection.

    I'm sure if you ask there will be others able to connect, compare settings.

    Don't forget to get a VPN, I use a paid service by CyberGhost, but there are others too.
    Originally posted by Frozen_up_north


    how do you know the VPN is secure? By its very nature you are taking your data through an extra place
    • Frozen_up_north
    • By Frozen_up_north 17th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    • 1,091 Posts
    • 481 Thanks
    Frozen_up_north
    • #8
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    how do you know the VPN is secure? By its very nature you are taking your data through an extra place
    Originally posted by glentoran99
    A paid for VPN is likely to be more secure than a free WiFi.
    • lammy82
    • By lammy82 17th Jul 17, 7:45 PM
    • 220 Posts
    • 211 Thanks
    lammy82
    • #9
    • 17th Jul 17, 7:45 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Jul 17, 7:45 PM
    It may be because your browser is trying to connect to an https site, and Chrome doesn't let the hotel's wifi intercept the secure connection to redirect you to the wifi logon page.

    So, when it gets blocked try manually navigating to a non-https site like "bbc.co.uk" which should then allow the browser to be redirected to the wifi logon page.
    • securityguy
    • By securityguy 19th Jul 17, 10:35 AM
    • 2,387 Posts
    • 3,630 Thanks
    securityguy
    http://neverssl.com/
    • paddyrg
    • By paddyrg 19th Jul 17, 2:57 PM
    • 13,014 Posts
    • 11,085 Thanks
    paddyrg
    It may be because your browser is trying to connect to an https site, and Chrome doesn't let the hotel's wifi intercept the secure connection to redirect you to the wifi logon page.

    So, when it gets blocked try manually navigating to a non-https site like "bbc.co.uk" which should then allow the browser to be redirected to the wifi logon page.
    Originally posted by lammy82
    Yes, this. It's a known "thing" with captive portals (as hotel etc landing pages are called). They help to set up a temporary IP address. Some devices like my old LG G4 automagically pop up a special page to get through the captive portal.
    • AndyPix
    • By AndyPix 19th Jul 17, 3:36 PM
    • 2,522 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    AndyPix
    It may be because your browser is trying to connect to an https site, and Chrome doesn't let the hotel's wifi intercept the secure connection to redirect you to the wifi logon page.

    So, when it gets blocked try manually navigating to a non-https site like "bbc.co.uk" which should then allow the browser to be redirected to the wifi logon page.
    Originally posted by lammy82

    ^^ Yep - this exactly , great post
    Running with scissors since 1978
    • glentoran99
    • By glentoran99 9th Aug 17, 12:29 PM
    • 4,416 Posts
    • 3,298 Thanks
    glentoran99
    http://koditips.com/news-hotspot-shield-snoops-users-sells-data/
    • kwikbreaks
    • By kwikbreaks 9th Aug 17, 1:48 PM
    • 8,826 Posts
    • 4,412 Thanks
    kwikbreaks
    I think the only VPN I'd fully trust is my own. If you stuck with the router provided by your ISP looking there for setting one up is probably futile but any decent router will let you set up an OpenVPN of your own which can be used on open WiFi. A Raspberry Pi will run one if your router can't.
    • RumRat
    • By RumRat 9th Aug 17, 1:53 PM
    • 2,441 Posts
    • 1,324 Thanks
    RumRat
    Does anyone still use Hotspot shield, it's been known for a while that it's not fit for purpose...Definitely find one that doesn't log anything and is preferably based outside of the 14 eyes nations, or, at the very least the 5 eyes.
    Drinking Rum before 10am makes you
    A PIRATE
    Not an Alcoholic...!
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 10th Aug 17, 11:37 AM
    • 11,462 Posts
    • 6,411 Thanks
    Strider590
    how do you know the VPN is secure? By its very nature you are taking your data through an extra place
    Originally posted by glentoran99
    It's protection from snooping by anyone using the same WiFi, I have software that could intercept traffic on a connected network and then show websites, usernames and passwords.

    I have two options for VPN, paid for and also my own hosted (which connects me directly to my home internet connection and uses that).

    I also have my own proxy server for bypassing firewall restrictions at any location and an encrypted SSH tunnel that achieves the same thing but with strong encryption.
    Even on a locked down network, all I have to do is run a port scan to find open outgoing ports and then route my connection through it via one of the above.

    Wherever I am and whatever I need to do, I have a solution.
    Having the last word isn't the same as being right.......

    "Never confuse education with intelligence"
    • AndyPix
    • By AndyPix 10th Aug 17, 12:03 PM
    • 2,522 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    AndyPix
    It's protection from snooping by anyone using the same WiFi, I have software that could intercept traffic on a connected network and then show websites, usernames and passwords. .
    Originally posted by Strider590

    You would have to do some arp table poisoning for that, then masquerade as the router and perform MITM ..
    Even then your not going to be snooping passwords and usernames unless they are in plain text which is unlikely.


    Yes im aware of ssl strip, but as far as im aware, in these hotel hotspots, each node is assigned its own vlan and cannot see the other devices on the network anyway
    Running with scissors since 1978
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 11th Aug 17, 8:34 AM
    • 11,462 Posts
    • 6,411 Thanks
    Strider590
    You would have to do some arp table poisoning for that, then masquerade as the router and perform MITM ..
    Even then your not going to be snooping passwords and usernames unless they are in plain text which is unlikely.


    Yes im aware of ssl strip, but as far as im aware, in these hotel hotspots, each node is assigned its own vlan and cannot see the other devices on the network anyway
    Originally posted by AndyPix
    I'm not going to head into the realms of hacking tools, only to say that I have old friends who made a career out of hacking and now ethical hacking. Not talking about useless graduates, i'm talking zero qualifications and scary levels of talent, learn't the hard way.

    As for hotspots, I do have a readily available app on my phone with can scan networks, returning host names and IP addresses for all connected clients, i've used it in hotels, airports, etc and although it needs a few attempts to fully scan every device, it does work very effectively, it even returns the type of device, sometimes the brand/model.
    Having the last word isn't the same as being right.......

    "Never confuse education with intelligence"
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