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    • jiggy2
    • By jiggy2 14th Jul 17, 12:58 PM
    • 382Posts
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    jiggy2
    Survey findings
    • #1
    • 14th Jul 17, 12:58 PM
    Survey findings 14th Jul 17 at 12:58 PM
    Hello,


    I just wanted to get some views on the issues that the surveyor has identified on a property we are looking to buy. The main issues are:


    Damp


    I find evidence of rising dampness to all of the walls to the older section of the ground floor in the kitchen, utility room, dining room and under stairs cupboard.


    I have found high damp readings to the chimney breast in the loft. The flashings are likely to be leaking externally or there is a lack of damp proof course. This will need further investigation.


    Prior to purchase, I very strongly recommend that you ask a specialist timber treatment and damp-proofing contractors to investigate and to advise upon the above and provide an estimate for necessary works.


    To put this into perspective, I regularly find these issues in a property of this age and type and design, but in this case, these issues are significant and should be resolved.


    Roof


    The roof slopes to the front and left side and ground floor roofs are covered with an older tile. Many are loose, slipping or broken. I am of the opinion that the roof covering to the front and side and ground floor is approaching a time where it will be more cost effective to replace the whole covering than make many small repairs.


    As a buyer, would you expect the seller to foot the bill for both the above issues? (for the full amount or a large part of it?). Or is the point regarding the roof effectively a wear and tear matter? (sounds expensive to fix).


    Any views appreciated. thanks
Page 1
    • Returntosender
    • By Returntosender 14th Jul 17, 1:41 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    Returntosender
    • #2
    • 14th Jul 17, 1:41 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Jul 17, 1:41 PM
    I'd be cautious about employing damp proof companies when you're buying an older house - I assume this is an older property. There is continuous talk among the surveyor community about the 'rising damp myth' - I'd suggest you google it and see for yourself. I highly recommend a chap called Peter Ward who does fantastic youtube videos trouncing the myths surrounding 'rising damp' - rising damp is usually a sign of another issue, ground levels, plants too close to the building, or even a leak.

    I'm currently going through a survey at the moment and will be negotiating on the basis of 'it will cost me such and such to fix' and therefore we would like to negotiate such and such off our original offer' - sometimes the vendor is happy to take a reduction, other times they'll offer to go halves. It's up to you which you are happier with.

    My surveyor pointed out an issue that had been started and not finished and recommends the vendor finish the work before we sign any contracts - but this is because the work was already started before they put the house on the market. Any other issues, I would argue are your responsibility as the new owner.
    • goodwithsaving
    • By goodwithsaving 14th Jul 17, 1:45 PM
    • 626 Posts
    • 955 Thanks
    goodwithsaving
    • #3
    • 14th Jul 17, 1:45 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Jul 17, 1:45 PM
    How much do you like the property? How much wiggle room does your vendor have? Would you go halves on repairs to avoid losing the property?
    Every time you borrow money, you’re robbing your future self. –Nathan W. Morris
    • jiggy2
    • By jiggy2 14th Jul 17, 2:36 PM
    • 382 Posts
    • 235 Thanks
    jiggy2
    • #4
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:36 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:36 PM
    I'd be cautious about employing damp proof companies when you're buying an older house - I assume this is an older property. There is continuous talk among the surveyor community about the 'rising damp myth' - I'd suggest you google it and see for yourself. I highly recommend a chap called Peter Ward who does fantastic youtube videos trouncing the myths surrounding 'rising damp' - rising damp is usually a sign of another issue, ground levels, plants too close to the building, or even a leak.

    I'm currently going through a survey at the moment and will be negotiating on the basis of 'it will cost me such and such to fix' and therefore we would like to negotiate such and such off our original offer' - sometimes the vendor is happy to take a reduction, other times they'll offer to go halves. It's up to you which you are happier with.

    My surveyor pointed out an issue that had been started and not finished and recommends the vendor finish the work before we sign any contracts - but this is because the work was already started before they put the house on the market. Any other issues, I would argue are your responsibility as the new owner.
    Originally posted by Returntosender

    Thanks. It is an older property (atleast the element which has the damp in).


    Will take a look at some videos. Would a damp surveyor (as opposed to a damp proofing company) be a better option?
    • zenshi
    • By zenshi 14th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    • 944 Posts
    • 1,941 Thanks
    zenshi
    • #5
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    I hab almost those exact words in my survey when I bought my 1850 house 20 years ago.

    The roof only started to cause problems a couple of years ago but this was exacerbated by bad winds. I've decided this year to have it re roofed as each individual repai is costly due to scaffold

    The damp I had was caused by blown render and failing tiled sills (strange to have externally tiled chills but common in my area with age of house

    I wouldn't let it put you off if you really want the house
    LBM.....sometime in 2013 £27,056. 10 creditors
    Aug 17......£18,258.....7 creditors left 32% paid

    £26,200 on interest only part of mortgage (July 16)...will chip away £23,922
    £49,200 repayment mortgage ( July 16) £46,020
    • jiggy2
    • By jiggy2 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    • 382 Posts
    • 235 Thanks
    jiggy2
    • #6
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    How much do you like the property? How much wiggle room does your vendor have? Would you go halves on repairs to avoid losing the property?
    Originally posted by goodwithsaving



    We do like the property quite a lot. Not sure how much wriggle room the vendors have (they are moving abroad). We probably would go halves on repairs (need to get an idea of total costs first but from what surveyor has said could be around £10k for the damp alone).


    Internally the house is all recently redecorated - so if there is damp work needed which results in having to replaster etc then other than the cost impact there is also impact on time etc that we weren't anticipating.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    • 23,130 Posts
    • 88,488 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #7
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    Would a damp surveyor (as opposed to a damp proofing company) be a better option?
    Originally posted by jiggy2
    A much better one, since he/she won't be incentivised to make extra work for the company.

    As regards the vendor chipping-in by lowering the price, that depends on how much matters like the dodgy roof have already been taken into account in the asking price, as well as the seller's situation/inclinations.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
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