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    • no.1swimmum
    • By no.1swimmum 14th Jul 17, 11:06 AM
    • 1,389Posts
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    no.1swimmum
    Claiming benefits when self funding in a care home
    • #1
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:06 AM
    Claiming benefits when self funding in a care home 14th Jul 17 at 11:06 AM
    I am all new to this so I am hoping that the kind people on here can help.

    I, along with my sister have enduring power of attorney for a very dear family friend, who is in her early 90's and has no living relatives.

    She is registered blind, had only peripheral vision in one eye, which she has since lost since entering the care home in March. She is also now unable to get to the bathroom without assistance and is in bed all day. The care home is costing just over £1000 a week

    When she first entered the home (which let add is lovely, great staff, food excellent etc) the manager said he would claim any relevant benefits, but we do not get an itemised bill - despite constantly asking for one, and the manager has become very evasive as to whether benefits are being claimed for!!

    She has now deteriorated drastically, and they think she has dementia and will require one on one care, which will obviously cost her more - no idea how much at the moment. We have enough accessible funds for more than 6 months and she has agreed that her property (an assisted living purpose built flat) can be sold.

    Is there anyway that I can find out if benefits are being claimed for he!, if its not being claimed then I will go ahead and start the process if she is entitled to them.

    Thank you for any help

Page 1
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 14th Jul 17, 11:20 AM
    • 27,807 Posts
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    Mojisola
    • #2
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:20 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:20 AM
    I, along with my sister have enduring power of attorney for a very dear family friend, who is in her early 90's and has no living relatives.

    When she first entered the home (which let add is lovely, great staff, food excellent etc) the manager said he would claim any relevant benefits, but we do not get an itemised bill - despite constantly asking for one, and the manager has become very evasive as to whether benefits are being claimed for!!
    Originally posted by no.1swimmum
    As you have power of attorney, you are in complete control of her finances. Why aren't you managing her money?
    • Alice Holt
    • By Alice Holt 14th Jul 17, 11:21 AM
    • 1,216 Posts
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    Alice Holt
    • #3
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:21 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:21 AM
    Attendance Allowance would be the appropriate benefit, along with possibly Pension Credit.

    As you have enduring power of attorney, it might be worth contacting the DWP as this should enable you to be recognised as her appointee.
    If so, you should then check her entitlements with the DWP. If AA is not being claimed (at the highest rate) then as an appointee you can make an application.
    Last edited by Alice Holt; 14-07-2017 at 11:56 AM.
    • pmlindyloo
    • By pmlindyloo 14th Jul 17, 11:23 AM
    • 10,509 Posts
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    pmlindyloo
    • #4
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:23 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:23 AM
    If she is receiving any benefits then they will show up on her bank statements. Since you have power of attorney you should be able to access her bank statements.

    As her savings have decreased then it is possible that she might be eligible for Pension Credit (means tested although the house would not count until it was sold.) Also, she would be entitled to Attendance Allowance since she is self funding. You could apply for both with your power of attorney on her behalf.

    Since your friend's health has deteriorated it seems that she should be assessed by her authority for continuing health care funding.

    First of all find out whether she is receiving Pension Credit and Attendance Allowance. AgeUK would give advice on these.

    Also you could ask for an assessment from Adult Social Services as regards her care.
    • poppy10
    • By poppy10 14th Jul 17, 11:44 PM
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    poppy10
    • #5
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:44 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:44 PM
    the manager said he would claim any relevant benefits, but we do not get an itemised bill - despite constantly asking for one, and the manager has become very evasive as to whether benefits are being claimed for!!
    Originally posted by no.1swimmum
    Why do you expect the manager to claim the relevant benefits when you are the one who holds EPA for finances?
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    • elsien
    • By elsien 14th Jul 17, 11:54 PM
    • 14,766 Posts
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    elsien
    • #6
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:54 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Jul 17, 11:54 PM
    What is the one on one care going to offer if your friend is in bed all the time? And is there a reason she is not sitting out sometimes (in a recliner chair if necessary) which is better for the chest. Is she not bored/lonely if she doesn't get out of bed into a communal area?
    There are many people in care homes with high care needs/dementia who don't need that level of support. I would query exactly what support she needs and why, as 1/1 (aside from personal care and mealtimes) is quite unusual for any length of time unless someone has behavioural support needs. If she genuinely needs that level of support for a large part of the day then I would suggest you look at having a CHC nursing need assessment.
    I'd also be scrutinising that level of fees very closely indeed. With no clarity as to what you are paying for it would be ringing alarm bells for me.
    Last edited by elsien; 14-07-2017 at 11:57 PM.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 15th Jul 17, 12:50 AM
    • 21,987 Posts
    • 12,685 Thanks
    xylophone
    • #7
    • 15th Jul 17, 12:50 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Jul 17, 12:50 AM
    See http://www.ageuk.org.uk/Documents/EN-GB/Factsheets/FS10_Paying_for_permanent_residential_care_fcs.pdf ?dtrk=true

    Have you claimed AA at higher level on behalf of your donor?

    Has an assessment by social services been done?

    Is she entitled to continuing health care?

    http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/Pages/nhs-continuing-care.aspx
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