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    • poppy_w
    • By poppy_w 13th Jul 17, 2:30 PM
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    poppy_w
    Hedge trimmers- petrol/corded/cordless
    • #1
    • 13th Jul 17, 2:30 PM
    Hedge trimmers- petrol/corded/cordless 13th Jul 17 at 2:30 PM
    Hi everyone,

    I am struggling to decide which hedge trimmers to buy and have reached review-reading overload. I would appreciate any help.

    I am considering the Bosch AHS 65-34 (corded), the Stihl HSA 56 cordless or the Stihl HS 45 petrol hedge trimmers.

    The Bosch is around £130 from Amazon, it's got good reviews (apart from when people have cut the cord), and is said to be powerful (700 watt) and has a good review from Which. People said it cuts through hedges like a knife through butter, which is what I need as some of the hedge is dense, like bay. The downside is one side of the hedge is on the street with no pavement, and the cord migh make it harder to move out of the way of cars quickly.

    The Stihl is around £200. It has the advantage of being cordless. It can cut up to 30mm branches so slightly smaller than the Bosch. The blade is also shorter ( a bit on the short side at 45 cm vs 60 cm for the Bosch). On the other hand, Stihl seem to be a good brand and people seem to complain about corded hedge trimmers. It's also recommended by Which, and you can get them serviced at Stihl dealers, I think. I am just not sure that it will be powerful enough, and I don't know how to compare it to the power of the corded one and if it will be good enough.

    Finally, there is the petrol Stihl, also around £200. I wasn't really thinking about petrol, but it might solve the issue of power. Somehow the petrol ones seem 'scarier' to use but that probably isn't logical as any of them could do damage. I suppose the advantage is not having a cable but still having power, but the disadvantage is the noise and petrol fumes, and having to wear ear defenders. Also having to buy and store petrol. Nevertheless, it might do the job better?

    Thanks for any help.
Page 1
    • keith969
    • By keith969 13th Jul 17, 3:29 PM
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    keith969
    • #2
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:29 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:29 PM
    It depends a lot on the size of the hedge, a cordless may not have enough charge to cut the whole thing, although a spare battery will help. Batteries that can supply plenty of power tend to be heavy though.

    My neighbour has a large hedge and has a petrol trimmer, it can certainly cope but yes it is a bit noisy (and you might also want to check the weight).
    Heaven wasn't built in a day
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 13th Jul 17, 3:39 PM
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    phil24_7
    • #3
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:39 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:39 PM
    I have a petrol hedge trimmer and I love it. I always feel that cordless one will be gutless or will run out of power too quickly (though I don't have many bushes to trim anymore) and corded ones are just 1 wrong movement away from needing a repair. Whilst my Stihl is a little noise it is a dodddle to use and isn't much heavier than an electric one.
    • poppy_w
    • By poppy_w 13th Jul 17, 3:44 PM
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    poppy_w
    • #4
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:44 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:44 PM
    Re: the weights, the Bosch AHS 65-34 corded is 3.8 kilos, the Stihl HSA 56 cordless is 3.7 kg with the battery and the Stihl HS 45 petrol is 5kg.

    Whilst my Stihl is a little noise it is a dodddle to use and isn't much heavier than an electric one.
    Originally posted by phil24_7
    Thanks, which Stihl do you have? Do you wear protective equipment? The shop I spoke to said I should get a forestry helmet with a visor as well, not sure if that's not overkill.

    Is it difficult to start? I have not been able to start someone's petrol lawnmower once, so it worries me that I might not be able to start it.
    Last edited by poppy_w; 13-07-2017 at 3:50 PM.
    • d0nkeyk0ng
    • By d0nkeyk0ng 13th Jul 17, 3:52 PM
    • 446 Posts
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    d0nkeyk0ng
    • #5
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:52 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jul 17, 3:52 PM
    I have a similar Bosch one (think it's the 70-34). Comfortable to hold. Easy to use but I have to use an extension wire with it. Our garden is quite small (10x15m probably) and it definitely cuts through hedges with ease.

    However, on any large garden, I'd want some sort of cordless variety - be it electric cordless or petrol powered.
    • poppy_w
    • By poppy_w 13th Jul 17, 4:01 PM
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    poppy_w
    • #6
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:01 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:01 PM
    The garden isn't massive but very long, there is around 40 metres of tall leylandii, 10 of lonicera, then another 10 of 5 foot mixed hedging (much shorter). I have a 50 metre extension already that I use for other tools.

    I'm planning on getting a long pole trimmer for the leylandii, so this other trimmer would be for all the other stuff. The leylandii also needs an annual cut from a tree surgeon, no way of avoiding that as the trunks need a chainsaw and at a height to boot. This costs hundreds of pounds annually.

    The other hedging is still dense, though and needs some power to be brought under control. It's not working to do it by hand, and it's very expensive to get someone in to do it every few months.
    Last edited by poppy_w; 13-07-2017 at 4:04 PM.
    • keith969
    • By keith969 13th Jul 17, 4:47 PM
    • 1,263 Posts
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    keith969
    • #7
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:47 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:47 PM
    The garden isn't massive but very long, there is around 40 metres of tall leylandii, 10 of lonicera, then another 10 of 5 foot mixed hedging (much shorter). I have a 50 metre extension already that I use for other tools.
    Originally posted by poppy_w
    Sounds like you need the petrol one. I have a petrol strimmer and chainsaw (don't have any hedges!), its not really any bother mixing up 2 stroke for them.
    Heaven wasn't built in a day
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 13th Jul 17, 4:51 PM
    • 2,330 Posts
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    EssexExile
    • #8
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:51 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:51 PM
    I have back trouble & have gradually got rid of most of my petrol gardening stuff as it's just too cumbersome to hold for any length of time. I have hedges down both sides of my 300ft garden & my Bosch corded hedge trimmer has been handling it fine for years. I bought a long reach one recently but it's too awkward for me, I let the neighbour do those bits now, he's younger & fitter.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • Ganga
    • By Ganga 13th Jul 17, 5:37 PM
    • 725 Posts
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    Ganga
    • #9
    • 13th Jul 17, 5:37 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jul 17, 5:37 PM
    The garden isn't massive but very long, there is around 40 metres of tall leylandii, 10 of lonicera, then another 10 of 5 foot mixed hedging (much shorter). I have a 50 metre extension already that I use for other tools.

    I'm planning on getting a long pole trimmer for the leylandii, so this other trimmer would be for all the other stuff. The leylandii also needs an annual cut from a tree surgeon, no way of avoiding that as the trunks need a chainsaw and at a height to boot. This costs hundreds of pounds annually.

    The other hedging is still dense, though and needs some power to be brought under control. It's not working to do it by hand, and it's very expensive to get someone in to do it every few months.
    Originally posted by poppy_w
    I do not know if you are male or female ( the user name poppy would sugest female ) but before you go down the avenue of a petrol hedge cutter bear in mind the weight and the fact that you will be using it with raised arms,also most are two stroke,that is petrol and oil mixed which has to be purchased as petrol and the oil mixed by yourself and also the storage of the petrol which is highly flammable.
    I would have thought that by now most battrey run tools are designed to run for a decent period of time on a single charge.
    You might also look at Ryobi,Bosch,Makita etc.There are loads of brands on the market.
    ITS NOT EASY TO GET EVERYTHING WRONG ,I HAVE TO WORK HARD TO DO IT!
    • poppy_w
    • By poppy_w 13th Jul 17, 6:37 PM
    • 6 Posts
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    poppy_w
    I have back trouble & have gradually got rid of most of my petrol gardening stuff as it's just too cumbersome to hold for any length of time. I have hedges down both sides of my 300ft garden & my Bosch corded hedge trimmer has been handling it fine for years. I bought a long reach one recently but it's too awkward for me, I let the neighbour do those bits now, he's younger & fitter.
    Originally posted by EssexExile
    Thanks, what kind of hedge do you have? And have you ever cut through the cord (seems to be a common problem)? Also, I understand that corded are fine for trimming, but can you do a 'cut back' with it or is that too much?
    Last edited by poppy_w; 14-07-2017 at 10:53 AM.
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 13th Jul 17, 7:27 PM
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    EssexExile
    Beech one side & hawthorn the other. If I want to seriously cut back then I go as far as I can with the hedge trimmer then finish off with loppers. The hedge trimmers will go through anything up to about half an inch. Yes I've cut through the cable once in 20 years, that's what RCDs are for.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 13th Jul 17, 7:37 PM
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    trailingspouse
    Personally I would go for the battery variety. You need to go to your supplier and try them out - literally hold them up at shoulder level (or however high your hedge is), and move them backwards and forwards as if trimming the hedge - and see how long you can do it for. That'll help you to decide quicker than anything else.
    • ic
    • By ic 13th Jul 17, 10:24 PM
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    ic
    I have an older but similar Bosch corded model (I certainly recall its 700W). It cuts through my hedges like butter - I can highly recommend it. I had previously used a Black & Decker and Flymo models, which just couldn't hack it. I've cut the cable a couple of times, but no problem as I have a very long extension cable anyway. I doubt a battery model could run long enough for me to do my garden - but would be very handy when doing a quick tidy up on the front hedge (fnar fnar).
    * my posts are made in good faith and only represent my own opinion, experience or understanding of a situation.
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 13th Jul 17, 10:32 PM
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    Strider590
    I have an electric hedge trimmer, 650W motor, it's taken a real battering and keeps coming back for more....... Bought it from Aldi 6 years ago, cost me about £35.
    “I may not agree with you, but I will defend to the death your right to make an a** of yourself.”

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    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Jul 17, 8:22 AM
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    Davesnave
    I have an older but similar Bosch corded model (I certainly recall its 700W). It cuts through my hedges like butter - I can highly recommend it. I had previously used a Black & Decker and Flymo models, which just couldn't hack it. I've cut the cable a couple of times, but no problem as I have a very long extension cable anyway. I doubt a battery model could run long enough for me to do my garden - but would be very handy when doing a quick tidy up on the front hedge (fnar fnar).
    Originally posted by ic
    This is my experience using a Bosch corded trimmer and comparing it with junk like B&D. I've also cut through the cord a few times, but it's possible to replace cable quite easily, and safety's not an issue if people are sensible enough to take precautions for that eventuality if using the mains.

    I've also used a Stihl 2 stroke hedge cutter, finding it slightly heavy for prolonged use as a small (and older) guy! I would pick the Bosch for a long hedge.

    The only experience I have with battery garden tools is with my Stihl chain saw, which I'm very pleased with, but that has a 6amp/hr battery and doesn't get used continuously like a hedge trimmer.

    As to wearing goggles and a helmet, it's often a toss up between protection and losing sensory awareness. The visor on the helmet is good, but I wear glasses anyway, so I prefer to go without.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • poppy_w
    • By poppy_w 14th Jul 17, 10:55 AM
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    poppy_w
    This is my experience using a Bosch corded trimmer and comparing it with junk like B&D. I've also cut through the cord a few times, but it's possible to replace cable quite easily, and safety's not an issue if people are sensible enough to take precautions for that eventuality if using the mains.

    I've also used a Stihl 2 stroke hedge cutter, finding it slightly heavy for prolonged use as a small (and older) guy! I would pick the Bosch for a long hedge.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Thanks, would you say there is a big difference in how easily the petrol and the electric cutters get through a hedge?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Jul 17, 11:46 AM
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    Davesnave
    Thanks, would you say there is a big difference in how easily the petrol and the electric cutters get through a hedge?
    Originally posted by poppy_w
    Not a huge one, so far as I recall. I only borrowed the Stihl machine for a short while to tackle some leylandii. Our neighbour had it handy at the time and offered it.

    The Bosch I use mostly on a 100m elm hedge, which is attended-to once a year, and it copes very well. I also use a cheap Aldi long reach for the top of that hedge, and once again it does a good enough job considering the price: £60
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 5th Sep 17, 2:38 PM
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    phil24_7
    Re: the weights, the Bosch AHS 65-34 corded is 3.8 kilos, the Stihl HSA 56 cordless is 3.7 kg with the battery and the Stihl HS 45 petrol is 5kg.



    Thanks, which Stihl do you have? Do you wear protective equipment? The shop I spoke to said I should get a forestry helmet with a visor as well, not sure if that's not overkill.

    Is it difficult to start? I have not been able to start someone's petrol lawnmower once, so it worries me that I might not be able to start it.
    Originally posted by poppy_w
    I have a HS 45.

    I do not use safety equipment when using this, though I do use stuff when using the chainsaw. If you are worried just get a set of safety glasses (goggles are equally overkill).

    Starting a Stihl is easy. Push the bleed bubble a few times, turn the choke on, pull the cord until it turns over (3-5 times normally), turn off the choke and pull the cord one more time and it should fire into life!

    Regards
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 5th Sep 17, 3:49 PM
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    Gloomendoom
    My wife does most of our hedge work. She uses a Makita cordless trimmer which she likes for its good balance and light weight. For tall stuff she has a corded pole mounted trimmer. It has the motor at the bottom of the pole, not on the head. Again, the balance is better and it's less tiring to use. For obstinate thick stuff she uses a corded pole pruner (mini chainsaw on a stick). PPE normally extends to gloves and safety specs for the trimmers or a full forestry helmet for the pole pruner.

    We try and use all electric tools at home as much as possible (including chainsaws) because of the much reduced noise levels.

    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 5th Sep 17, 6:09 PM
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    I have spoken
    I got a cordless (all be it cheap) one from Amazon and it was a total joke, the reciprocating rate of the blades was glacially slow. Sent it straight back.
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