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    • miller
    • By miller 12th Jul 17, 5:10 PM
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    miller
    Dentist - check up frequency
    • #1
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:10 PM
    Dentist - check up frequency 12th Jul 17 at 5:10 PM
    For the past 5 years, my dentist has recommended a check up every 6 months, but instead I have attended every year.

    In these 5 years I have had no work carried out (lucky me) and have been relieved of 5 x Band A charges.

    I have looked on the NHS website but cannot find the information and on the practice website; is there a maximum interval I can leave between appointments before I get removed from their register?
Page 1
    • Torry Quine
    • By Torry Quine 12th Jul 17, 5:16 PM
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    Torry Quine
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:16 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:16 PM
    The only person who can you is your dentist.
    Life is like riding a bicycle, to keep your balance you must keep moving . Albert Einstein.

    I can bear pain myself, he said softly, but I couldna bear yours. That would take more strength than I have -
    Diana Gabaldon, Outlander
    • Mee
    • By Mee 12th Jul 17, 5:22 PM
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    Mee
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:22 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:22 PM
    I normally follow the advice of the NHS Choices:
    "How often should I have a dental check-up?

    After your check-up, your dentist will recommend a date for your next visit. The time to your next check-up could be as short as three months or as long as two years (or up to one year if you're under 18).
    Generally, the lower your risk of dental problems, the longer you can wait before your next check-up. So people with good oral health will probably need to attend only once every 12 to 24 months, but those with more problems will need check-ups more often. "


    A friend of mine had the same problem, so I suggest he do as I do if pressured to have one every 6 month - say you're going away for awhile or make it then change it...
    You can click the Thanks button if you want

    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 12th Jul 17, 11:27 PM
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    brook2jack
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 17, 11:27 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 17, 11:27 PM
    Oral cancer kills more people each year than testicular cancer and cervical cancer combined. It is the cancer that is increasing most rapidly in occurrence in the U.K. And is appearing in younger and younger people. The youngest I've heard of is 14.

    For this reason it is suggested that check ups are left no further apart than one year for anyone. The up to two years quoted by NHS websites has nothing to do with research on oral health and everything to do with squeezing more patients in .

    In England and Wales there is no such thing as registration any more and hasn't been since 2006. The dentist has no obligation to see you outside of a course of treatment. Most will try to see regular patients but someone who leaves it a long time will be unlikely to be seen again .

    Northern Ireland and Scotland do still have registration but since you are talking about bands of charges I imagine you are in England or Wales.
    • miller
    • By miller 13th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
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    miller
    • #5
    • 13th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
    Oral cancer kills more people each year than testicular cancer and cervical cancer combined. It is the cancer that is increasing most rapidly in occurrence in the U.K. And is appearing in younger and younger people. The youngest I've heard of is 14.
    Originally posted by brook2jack
    I would of course accept that as a reason for a 6-month frequency ("we want to be careful" or similar), but those risks have not been explained to me. By choosing to effectively double the time between their recommended visits, anecdotally it would seem I risk being a lower priority than patients who dutifully attend & spend.

    Northern Ireland and Scotland do still have registration but since you are talking about bands of charges I imagine you are in England or Wales.
    Originally posted by brook2jack
    Yes, they are in England. Effectively my position as a patient then is as a customer who they can refuse to see for any reason (including, but not limited to not following their recommnendations).

    Think I'll stick to going every year whilst the going is good.
    • miller
    • By miller 13th Jul 17, 9:24 AM
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    miller
    • #6
    • 13th Jul 17, 9:24 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Jul 17, 9:24 AM
    A friend of mine had the same problem, so I suggest he do as I do if pressured to have one every 6 month - say you're going away for awhile or make it then change it...
    Originally posted by Mee
    I wonder what percentage of patients this happens to nationally and what controls are in place? Could be a fair bit of NHS cash and peoples' time lining dentists' pockets.

    ...one of my old dentists used to drive a Porsche.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 13th Jul 17, 12:22 PM
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    teddysmum
    • #7
    • 13th Jul 17, 12:22 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jul 17, 12:22 PM
    The receptionists at my dentist's always say something to the effect that your next appointment will be due in [Month] which is 6 months later. Some take the offer, but I always ask for a 12 month appointment, as it's always possible to have an earlier appointment, if needed.
    • newatc
    • By newatc 13th Jul 17, 12:37 PM
    • 36 Posts
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    newatc
    • #8
    • 13th Jul 17, 12:37 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jul 17, 12:37 PM
    My dentist used to say next appointment 6 months but now says 6-9 months so I go for 9 months. Apart from visit to hygenist, I haven't had work done on my teeth for at least 15 years!
    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 13th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
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    brook2jack
    • #9
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
    I wonder what percentage of patients this happens to nationally and what controls are in place? Could be a fair bit of NHS cash and peoples' time lining dentists' pockets.

    ...one of my old dentists used to drive a Porsche.
    Originally posted by miller

    The dentist does not get any extra money. They are given a set budget each year (udas units of dental activity) . If they do less activity they have to pay money back , if they do more they do not get any more money, but they have to deduct patient charges so they lose money!!!

    Questionnaires are sent out to randomly chosen patients to check on treatment, recalls and charges.

    All dentists have all NHS activity monitored statistically and they have meetings quarterly to discuss their statistics. E.g. If patients are returning too often in a year, if too many emergency treatments are done etc. They then have more money deducted.

    Dentists who do not conform will lose their NHS contract and have to repay money.

    Dentists earnings have fallen every year in the last ten years. The average dental student is now coming out of uni with £80,000 debt. Considering 80% do not own their own practice and looking at average earnings precious few could afford a new Porsche .
    https://www.smarterwebcompany.co.uk/dentalrecruitnetwork2-co-uk/_img/Copy%20of%20Dental%20Salary%20Survey%202016.pdf
    Last edited by brook2jack; 13-07-2017 at 4:19 PM.
    • miller
    • By miller 13th Jul 17, 5:40 PM
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    miller
    All dentists have all NHS activity monitored statistically and they have meetings quarterly to discuss their statistics. E.g. If patients are returning too often in a year, if too many emergency treatments are done etc. They then have more money deducted.
    Originally posted by brook2jack
    They'd better sift out the Haribo addicts then
    • Tigsteroonie
    • By Tigsteroonie 13th Jul 17, 5:49 PM
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    Tigsteroonie
    Our dentist says we should have a check-up six months after a visit, but we don't arrange it at that time. They then text us a reminder at six months, I telephone, they cannot fit us in for a while ... and so it becomes an eight/nine month pattern. That suits us, and doesn't seem to perturb our dentist.
    Going to become Mrs Marleyboy for real

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    • brook2jack
    • By brook2jack 13th Jul 17, 8:29 PM
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    brook2jack
    They'd better sift out the Haribo addicts then
    Originally posted by miller
    And therein lies the problem.

    Dentists are not allowed to refuse to treat someone who needs a lot of treatment. So they will be paid the same for someone who only needs one filling as someone who needs 10 fillings, root canal treatment, treatment of gum disease etc.

    In truth a dentist loses so much money treating the haribo addict they would be better off paying them £20 to go elsewhere.

    This is why 85% of practices fail to hit their treatment targets (units of dental activity) every year and end up repaying huge sums. Each year fewer and fewer practices hit their targets and repay more and more money , whilst each year the costs of running a practice increase exponentially.

    A conservative estimate is it costs around £120 an hour to run each surgery/room in a dental practice in a cheap area. The practice gets no grants to pay for equipment,staff,training,materials etc except what it earns per patient seen.
    • geriann
    • By geriann 13th Jul 17, 9:14 PM
    • 149 Posts
    • 254 Thanks
    geriann
    I normally follow the advice of the NHS Choices:
    "How often should I have a dental check-up?

    After your check-up, your dentist will recommend a date for your next visit. The time to your next check-up could be as short as three months or as long as two years (or up to one year if you're under 18).
    Generally, the lower your risk of dental problems, the longer you can wait before your next check-up. So people with good oral health will probably need to attend only once every 12 to 24 months, but those with more problems will need check-ups more often. "
    Originally posted by Mee
    it's interesting to see what NHS Choices says & to read that everybody's dentist says different time-lengths between appointments.

    for as long as i can remember my dentist has said see her every 6 months. she says the same to my parents.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 14th Jul 17, 2:52 AM
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    jenniewb
    I think you'd get a clearer answer from the surgery receptionists- I'd be more concerned that (if it were me) I'd be deleted from the systems if I didn't show at least once every 2years- though some may have this as a year and I suppose you'd only know by asking.


    Having said that, I'd be wanting to visit at least once a year and ideally every 6 months if my teeth were OK. With appointments and waiting lists for work to be done etc the last thing you want is to find you have something which isn't an emergency but requires an appointment and you have to wait weeks before an appointment then a further few weeks for work to be carried out.


    At my surgery we get a text reminder AND a letter written if it's been 6 months, though due to other commitments I've let that slip in the past before making an appointment because I needed it and they couldn't find me on the system- I don't know if this was a technical glitch (there were new systems put in between my appointments) or if they'd thought I wasn't coming back.


    I know London is different and finding an NHS dentist isn't so tricky here but have heard of other areas where people queue for miles and come from miles and miles away when a new NHS dentist is registered. If you know this is going to be a situation you'd end up without a dentist, please don't end up excommunicated!
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