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    • Luce210
    • By Luce210 12th Jul 17, 2:14 PM
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    Luce210
    Warranty for victiorian house
    • #1
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:14 PM
    Warranty for victiorian house 12th Jul 17 at 2:14 PM
    Hi,

    I'm looking for some advice, I am a first time buyer and have had an offer accepted on a Victorian terraced house. The mortgage lender has completed a valuation and the valuer has deemed the property as being a refurbishment. In order to go ahead with the mortgage with the Halifax they have requested that the valuer needs to see an acceptable warranty or professional consultant's certificate before he is able to confirm the valuation on the property.
    They have suggested either..:
    NHBC
    Premier Guarantee - includes the LABC New Homes Warranty and LABC Hallmark Scheme
    Building LifePlans Ltd (BLP)
    CRL Management Limited - previously known as Construction Register Limited (CRL)
    Build zone
    Or architect certificate???

    Has anyone ever heard of having to do this before for an older property? I thought this was for a new build? If so which of the above would you recommend?

    Many Thanks!!
Page 1
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 12th Jul 17, 2:19 PM
    • 1,023 Posts
    • 1,155 Thanks
    Surrey_EA
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:19 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:19 PM
    I have also never heard of this. It's possible that an error has been made and a tick has gone in the wrong box somewhere.

    How extensively has the property been refurbished?

    Are you using a broker, or dealing with the Halifax direct?
    • sheff6107
    • By sheff6107 12th Jul 17, 2:20 PM
    • 403 Posts
    • 276 Thanks
    sheff6107
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:20 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:20 PM
    The vendor should have paperwork from their architect
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 12th Jul 17, 2:23 PM
    • 1,023 Posts
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    Surrey_EA
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:23 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:23 PM
    The vendor should have paperwork from their architect
    Originally posted by sheff6107
    From the information provided so far, how can we tell the services of an architect were required?
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 12th Jul 17, 2:25 PM
    • 5,409 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #5
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:25 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:25 PM
    What sort of "refurbishment" are we talking about? I'd only expect such a warranty if it was something being completely gutted and rebuilt internally.
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 12th Jul 17, 2:41 PM
    • 4,812 Posts
    • 4,451 Thanks
    eddddy
    • #6
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:41 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:41 PM
    If the warranty wasn't arranged before the renovation started, I think it's very unlikely that anyone would offer a warranty retrospectively.


    The warranty provider would want to make sure that dry rot and subsidence cracks have not been hidden behind 'shiny new' plasterboard. That can't be checked effectively once the renovation is complete.


    I wonder if this is just something routine for Halifax, or whether the valuer is raising a red flag, because he/she suspects a bodge job.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 12th Jul 17, 3:05 PM
    • 3,620 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #7
    • 12th Jul 17, 3:05 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jul 17, 3:05 PM
    If the build has involved a conversion of use, or is sufficiently extensive to be classed as a full renovation, some (all?) mortgage companies require certification of the works before they will lend.

    If the property has just been "done up" by an amateur, you might be able to dispute the request, but if a building firm has done a complete renovation, you are often required to provide proof that all building regulations have been met, as well as some indemnity to cover the work.

    It's treated much as a new build under those circumstances.

    What work has been done?
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 12th Jul 17, 3:32 PM
    • 1,023 Posts
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    Surrey_EA
    • #8
    • 12th Jul 17, 3:32 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jul 17, 3:32 PM
    If the build has involved a conversion of use, or is sufficiently extensive to be classed as a full renovation, some (all?) mortgage companies require certification of the works before they will lend.

    If the property has just been "done up" by an amateur, you might be able to dispute the request, but if a building firm has done a complete renovation, you are often required to provide proof that all building regulations have been met, as well as some indemnity to cover the work.
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    Completely. If a loft has been converted, and/or walls removed then building regs certificates and potentially planning permission need to be produced.
    It's treated much as a new build under those circumstances.
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    I would have said it's treated differently. NHBC, or similar build warranty is almost essential for a new build, but refurbs would never have such documentation.
    • Luce210
    • By Luce210 12th Jul 17, 3:55 PM
    • 5 Posts
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    Luce210
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 17, 3:55 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 17, 3:55 PM
    Thank you for your reply, the house has had a single story extension to the rear and some plastering and painting and decorating to freshen up the main part of the property. The extension has been signed off and a certificate has been completed by a building control officer. I am dealing direct with the Halifax who use colleys as their valuers and they believe that this is a referbishment? Unfortunately the valuer is on holiday at current but is it possible to argue this with him?
    Many thanks
    • BJV
    • By BJV 12th Jul 17, 3:57 PM
    • 2,230 Posts
    • 3,346 Thanks
    BJV
    As other posts say think it is a mistake. We sold and have just bought another Victorian house. When we sold we just had to give paperwork ref sign off for electrical work we had had not. Building control bits for extension.

    Fingers crossed it is just a mistake and as soon as they are back of holiday it will all be sorted. Shame really as it will be more stress for you.

    Good look and enjoy your new home.
    Happiness, Health and Wealth in that order please!
    • Luce210
    • By Luce210 12th Jul 17, 5:47 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Luce210
    A single story extension has been added to the rear and some painting and decorating to the rest of the house
    If the build has involved a conversion of use, or is sufficiently extensive to be classed as a full renovation, some (all?) mortgage companies require certification of the works before they will lend.

    If the property has just been "done up" by an amateur, you might be able to dispute the request, but if a building firm has done a complete renovation, you are often required to provide proof that all building regulations have been met, as well as some indemnity to cover the work.

    It's treated much as a new build under those circumstances.

    What work has been done?
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 12th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    • 1,023 Posts
    • 1,155 Thanks
    Surrey_EA
    A single story extension has been added to the rear and some painting and decorating to the rest of the house
    Originally posted by Luce210
    I see no reason why the lender should be expecting any more than the usual building regs certificates, and planning docs, if the extension did not fall under permitted development.

    There is no way such work would be expected to come with an NHBC or the like. I think you'll find the valuer has made an error on the form somewhere.
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