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  • FIRST POST
    • ladymint
    • By ladymint 12th Jul 17, 2:13 PM
    • 25Posts
    • 3Thanks
    ladymint
    Help identifying hedge
    • #1
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:13 PM
    Help identifying hedge 12th Jul 17 at 2:13 PM
    Hi,

    I saw this hedge today and loved it. Do you have any idea what type of conifer it is? Please see images in links below.

    Many thanks in advance for your help!

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/gaoak74zeitoizm/Conifer1.jpg?dl=0

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/aantrhdi24gptgu/Conifer2.jpg?dl=0
    Last edited by ladymint; 12-07-2017 at 2:15 PM.
Page 1
    • Denene
    • By Denene 12th Jul 17, 2:28 PM
    • 130 Posts
    • 174 Thanks
    Denene
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:28 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:28 PM
    Some kind of cypress - possibly Leylandii? It's quite popular for hedging
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 12th Jul 17, 2:39 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
    • 1,505 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:39 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:39 PM
    It might look attractive now but take a look at the woody stumps behind it to see what it will eventually look like...
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 12th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    • 7,912 Posts
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    andrewf75
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jul 17, 2:42 PM
    Not often you hear someone say they love a leylandii hedge! They were popular decades ago, now people are extremely wary of them and rightly so.
    • ladymint
    • By ladymint 12th Jul 17, 4:05 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    ladymint
    • #5
    • 12th Jul 17, 4:05 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jul 17, 4:05 PM
    Thank you all for your posts.

    Well, I suspected it was leylandii but it looks much nicer than all other leylandii hedges I've seen so far. It looks completely different from the one at the back, which is darker. Its colour is what I'm used to see in young conifers but this one is already well established. Any idea what type of leylandii this might be?

    andrewf75: I'm ok with leylandii. I know that they grow wild by I will be keeping it under control.
    Last edited by ladymint; 12-07-2017 at 4:18 PM.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 12th Jul 17, 4:18 PM
    • 28,655 Posts
    • 72,979 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #6
    • 12th Jul 17, 4:18 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jul 17, 4:18 PM
    Any idea what type of leylandii this might be?

    I'm ok with leylandii. I know that they grow wild by I will be keeping it under control.
    Originally posted by ladymint
    Good luck getting anyone to identify different Leylandii.

    The hybrids are all the result of crosses between Monterey cypress and Nootka cypress.

    You'll have your work cut out keeping them cut back - they can easily put on a metre of growth every year.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 12th Jul 17, 4:40 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #7
    • 12th Jul 17, 4:40 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jul 17, 4:40 PM
    You'll have your work cut out keeping them cut back - they can easily put on a metre of growth every year.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Yes, and they never look great when they are cut back. I've inherited them in three successive houses and in the last two, ended up removing them completely because they grew upwards and outwards at a terrific rate, ruining the grass and fences beneath them. My attempts to control them resulted in bleak, woody holes and the complete loss of the conical shape.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 12th Jul 17, 5:29 PM
    • 1,325 Posts
    • 1,254 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #8
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:29 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:29 PM
    Leylandii can make excellent hedging plants, but they're very high maintenance.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 12th Jul 17, 5:34 PM
    • 2,914 Posts
    • 1,665 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:34 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 17, 5:34 PM
    Leylandii - don't get them, there are much better hedging options. We have a line of leylandii (a mixture of different types) lining the driveway to the side of our house - about a dozen of them about 3m tall. It cost us £500 to have the whole lot trimmed and reduced in height back in Spring. I'll be investing in a decent pole hedge trimmer so I can keep them tidy myself from now on!

    The problem with them is you can't let them get away from you - if they grow too tall you need to reduce their height in stages and they won't look great once the tops are lopped off. If they grow out too much at the sides you can only cut them back as far as the green growth - if you cut back to dead wood it will never grow back. They can also get aphids and are susceptible to frost damage.

    On the plus side the disguise a horrible old fence and can look quite tidy once trimmed but we'll have to constantly maintain them. Their roots also grow very near to the surface, drying out the soil and severely limiting your options for underplanting. If it wasn't such a long run, I'd be seriously contemplating removing them and replacing with something else.

    Maybe consider something like laurel?

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=laurel+hedging&safe=off&client=safari&rls =en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiJu4C_lYT VAhWKJ8AKHZIOAlsQ_AUICygC&biw=1526&bih=885

    Or if you really like the Leylandii look, perhaps consider Thuja instead:
    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=thuja+hedging&safe=off&client=safari&rls= en&tbm=isch&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjfvJnylYTV AhXkAcAKHR65A0UQ_AUIyAEoAQ&biw=1526&bih=885
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 12th Jul 17, 5:40 PM
    • 1,205 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    Another vote for laurel. It makes a really attractive hedge. It does take a bit of control because it grows outwards, the foliage isn't very deep and if you're not careful when trimming it it can be a bit patchy for a while. The dried leaves burn really well and make an excellent bonfire-catalyst!
    • tiz
    • By tiz 12th Jul 17, 8:18 PM
    • 99 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    tiz
    Thuja maybe - they are brighter green than Leylandii and will regrow after pruning.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Jul 17, 5:40 AM
    • 23,712 Posts
    • 89,694 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Thuja maybe - they are brighter green than Leylandii and will regrow after pruning.
    Originally posted by tiz

    This ^ is probably the right answer, and if it isn't, then it could be worth looking into as an alternative to the ubiquitous Leyland Cypress.

    The variety Emerald (Smaragd) is supposed to be good.

    Also consider this:
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/details?plantid=694

    More classy than laurel.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 13-07-2017 at 5:43 AM.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • ladymint
    • By ladymint 14th Jul 17, 2:28 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    ladymint
    tiz and Davesnave: I think you managed to identify it! I'm pretty sure it's a Thuja and it sounds much better than Leylandii! Thank you very much for this.

    Thank you all for your help and advice.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 14th Jul 17, 2:45 PM
    • 7,912 Posts
    • 13,360 Thanks
    andrewf75
    hornbeam is good
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