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  • FIRST POST
    • Jb_1982
    • By Jb_1982 11th Jul 17, 9:23 PM
    • 51Posts
    • 17Thanks
    Jb_1982
    Conservatory Doors
    • #1
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:23 PM
    Conservatory Doors 11th Jul 17 at 9:23 PM
    Hi All

    What are the regulations for removing conservatory doors between the living room and the conservatory? I understand there are some form of regulations I need to abide by, but I'm not sure what they are. I know it's possible but I want to know how!

    Thanks
Page 1
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 11th Jul 17, 9:36 PM
    • 731 Posts
    • 558 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:36 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:36 PM
    Building Regulations?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Jul 17, 9:50 PM
    • 23,743 Posts
    • 66,076 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:50 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:50 PM
    Yes, building regulations.

    A conservatory is classed as an outbuilding. In order to remain so, there needs to be quality doors between house and conservatory.

    As soon as you remove the doors, it becomes an extension to the house and needs to meet all the regulations for an extension. Conservatories rarely even begin to touch building regulation standards. The first one it isn't going to meet is thermal efficiency as they leak heat like oil is going out of fashion.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Jb_1982
    • By Jb_1982 11th Jul 17, 10:01 PM
    • 51 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    Jb_1982
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:01 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:01 PM
    Ok, so what needs to be done to make the conservatory pass these building regulations?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • 23,743 Posts
    • 66,076 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    In a word? Everything.

    I have heard anecdotally on here that sometimes building inspectors will accept upgrading thermal efficiency through the house in return for allowing the doors to be removed, but I am dubious.

    There is a reason why conservatories are cheaper than extensions. It is because they do not comply. Not foundations, not insulation, not thermal efficiency.

    You can ask your local authority building control and see what they say but I wouldn't be too optimistic.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 11th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • 731 Posts
    • 558 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    Ok, so what needs to be done to make the conservatory pass these building regulations?
    Originally posted by Jb_1982
    Have you got a polycarbonate or glass roof?
    • Jb_1982
    • By Jb_1982 11th Jul 17, 10:27 PM
    • 51 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    Jb_1982
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:27 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:27 PM
    Have you got a polycarbonate or glass roof?
    Originally posted by AndyMc.....

    The roof is made of glass, double glazed along with the windows.
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 11th Jul 17, 10:33 PM
    • 731 Posts
    • 558 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:33 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 17, 10:33 PM
    Ultimately it's up to you what you do in your own home. It's probably never going to get approval so could be an issue when you sell. Have you got somewhere to store the doors?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Jul 17, 6:30 AM
    • 23,105 Posts
    • 88,435 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 17, 6:30 AM
    • #9
    • 12th Jul 17, 6:30 AM
    Given that doors are made for humans to enter and exit by, what advantages do you perceive in removing the doors altogether?

    You should bear in mind that the doors, if external quality, stop the conservatory sucking heat from the house in the depths of winter and keep overheated air from moving into the house in summer, although the latter depends to some extent on factors like ventilation and aspect.

    If you think that the advantage outweighs the disadvantages, then removing the doors could be done on a trial basis for, say, a six months, starting in September. That will give you long enough to see how your fuel bills are impacted.

    I have a heat-efficient conservatory, as far as most conservatories go, but it still has huge areas of glass, so I don't kid myself it meets building regs. I'd not want its 28c coming into my house on hot days, never mind the cold 'pull' on winter nights, even though the heating system could cope.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 12-07-2017 at 7:45 AM.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 12th Jul 17, 9:04 AM
    • 3,855 Posts
    • 3,821 Thanks
    sillygoose
    My way round this was to install bi-folding patio doors between lounge and conservatory. They are glass with slim aluminium frames and of external grade so satisfying regulations.

    Very effective insulation, effective at keeping heat out the lounge when the conservatory has been shut up and very hot or cold out in the winter, also nearly soundproof so when shut the conservatory and lounge can be used for different purposes. I also like the extra security as conservatories can be vulnerable and a burglar would then have to tackle another layer of multi-point locked doors to get into the house.

    You can choose how many panels its made up of, I had 3 so when folded to the side the intrusion into the room is quite small, also had the conservatory floor height made to match the lounge level so a very low threshold track on the bottom could be used, no trip hazard. When opened up its like all one room. One panel can be open on its own acting as an access door so you don't have to keep opening the whole thing just to go in and out.

    Many many people have admired the setup.
    Last edited by sillygoose; 12-07-2017 at 10:57 AM.
    • prezzacc
    • By prezzacc 18th Jul 17, 8:25 PM
    • 107 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    prezzacc
    Hi Sillygoose,

    Can i ask where you got these doors, im also looking at a similar option. But am finding the opening between living room and conservatory a little small. Not quite 6ft wide.

    Thanks
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 19th Jul 17, 8:05 AM
    • 692 Posts
    • 253 Thanks
    Ant555
    Hi Sillygoose,

    Can i ask where you got these doors, im also looking at a similar option. But am finding the opening between living room and conservatory a little small. Not quite 6ft wide.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by prezzacc
    Hi Prezzac,

    We had similar to SillyGoose as the opening was originally a window so not very wide - we started with a simple opening to the conservatory with no door but it was REALLY cold and after putting up with it for a few years fitted really neat 3 panel bifold doors, the door on the right of mine is, effectively, just like a single door with a handle and we just use this day to day. Fold back when warm or we have guests - i'm really pleased with the way it turned out.

    Anyway, if you are Manchester, stockport, or North West general then I will pass on the fitter details with pleasure and no hesitation - its a well-established small family firm that gets most of its business from word-of-mouth ,just let me know.
    We were so impressed with the work that we had the windows replaced in the whole house - Friends have since also had bifold to conservatory fitted same as us to replace their sliding 'patio doors' which ended up inside the house of course when conservatory was fitted.
    One of my main concerns was that there would be a 'step' for the runner at the bottom of the bifolds but he was able to fit it level which is brill.

    hope this helps
    Let me know.
    Thanks
    Last edited by Ant555; 19-07-2017 at 8:09 AM.
    • prezzacc
    • By prezzacc 20th Jul 17, 6:49 PM
    • 107 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    prezzacc
    Hi Ant,

    Thanks for coming on and replying. That sounds like a similar situation. However im afraid the opposite direction and down south!

    If you dont me asking roughly how wide is your opening as i really cant seem to find much about "slim" bifold doors. 176cm is my opening. All companies ive tried have only offered me 2 doors. But i want the same setup you mention with the everyday door and then the option to fold back.

    Ill find some one day im sure!!
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 20th Jul 17, 9:01 PM
    • 2,327 Posts
    • 1,551 Thanks
    EssexExile
    What do you see as the advantage of three panel bifolds over two doors? When closed there will be more frame so less light will get through, when one is open the opening will be less than 2 feet wide, when it's all open there will be two doors stacked one side so the opening won't be as wide as it is with two doors.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 20th Jul 17, 9:55 PM
    • 692 Posts
    • 253 Thanks
    Ant555
    Hi Ant,

    Thanks for coming on and replying. That sounds like a similar situation. However im afraid the opposite direction and down south!

    If you dont me asking roughly how wide is your opening as i really cant seem to find much about "slim" bifold doors. 176cm is my opening. All companies ive tried have only offered me 2 doors. But i want the same setup you mention with the everyday door and then the option to fold back.

    Ill find some one day im sure!!
    Originally posted by prezzacc
    The opening is 176! - probably a standard ex-window size.
    I think made to order but my window fitter took measurements and offered different opening options - left hand door, right hand door, which way the 'fold' goes etc.
    He didn't know if the floor track would be flush until he cut into the laminate flooring and saw what was underneath (by the way we had decent laminate all the way through and it was undamaged.
    I could send pic if you wanted to show any potential fitter.

    If I were you, I would look at local window fitters and possibly ask one or two for a quote - my man is primarily a window fitter but also does doors. He got the doors 'made' in Liverpool but I wouldn't think they were the only people to make this type of thing. Friends saw ours and ordered the same from him, their opening was/is wider.
    Last edited by Ant555; 20-07-2017 at 10:13 PM.
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 20th Jul 17, 10:02 PM
    • 692 Posts
    • 253 Thanks
    Ant555
    What do you see as the advantage of three panel bifolds over two doors? When closed there will be more frame so less light will get through, when one is open the opening will be less than 2 feet wide, when it's all open there will be two doors stacked one side so the opening won't be as wide as it is with two doors.
    Originally posted by EssexExile
    I understand the question and its a good point but the light is really not an issue. With a two door setup, I can;t picture how they would 'fold' - If the right hand door opened into the conservatory then how would the left hand door slide to the left on a track - if it had no track then thats a huge door to have on a hinge.
    The opening door that we use dozens of times every day is pretty much exactly the same width as the French doors leading from conservatory to garden and we only open one of them typically- 2foot-ish.
    For me, the 3 way bifold is absolutely what I wanted and it works for us.
    Last edited by Ant555; 20-07-2017 at 10:12 PM.
    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 27th Jul 17, 4:28 PM
    • 164 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    Clairabella
    Hi Ant,

    We are wanting to replace our door to the conservatory too. Please can I ask, are your doors UPVC or aluminium? Also how wide is the profile between the doors? We are near Burnley so might well be able to use your fitter!
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 28th Jul 17, 10:12 AM
    • 692 Posts
    • 253 Thanks
    Ant555
    Hi Ant,

    We are wanting to replace our door to the conservatory too. Please can I ask, are your doors UPVC or aluminium? Also how wide is the profile between the doors? We are near Burnley so might well be able to use your fitter!
    Originally posted by Clairabella
    They are UPVC BiFold doors - I think outside door thermal/security quality or whatever the term is. The opening from wall to wall is 176cm - it used to be a window, previous owners converted normal window to sliding patio doors to garden and when we put the conservatory on the house we just removed the sliding patio doors. Looked great but was flipping cold in winter! I thought the opening would be too small for folding doors but they work well for us. yes, we loose a little bit of the opening on the left when doors folded open but our configuration of furniture means its absolutely no issue for us.

    The conservatory is effectively our back door to the garden and recycling bins etc so we are in/out of our right-hand bifold door many times each day - it just opens/closes/locks the same as a normal door would.

    Its not these specifically, but this link shows visually what my internal doors look like - apart from the fact they are on the inside between dining room and conservatory and open 'into' my conservatory...
    https://www.flyingdoors.co.uk/shop/upvc-bifold-doors/white-upvc-bifold-doors/6ft-white-upvc-bifold-door-set

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Ant555; 28-07-2017 at 10:18 AM.
    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 28th Jul 17, 6:54 PM
    • 164 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    Clairabella
    Thank you. I had just about discounted bi fold doors but now I've looked at these I am having a rethink. The width of the profiles is a concern as the door is the only light into a long kitchen. I'm thinking that we need as much glass as possible hence my querying aluminium.
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 28th Jul 17, 11:36 PM
    • 692 Posts
    • 253 Thanks
    Ant555
    No problem. I am sure you will make the right decision for your circumstances.

    However, I would say that the light coming through the doors is definitely not an issue for us in our dining room even in the winter months.
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