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  • FIRST POST
    • nnb
    • By nnb 11th Jul 17, 8:11 PM
    • 46Posts
    • 6Thanks
    nnb
    Can I refuse my LA access?
    • #1
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:11 PM
    Can I refuse my LA access? 11th Jul 17 at 8:11 PM
    I had an email yesterday from my letting agent informing me that the new tenants have arranged to have broadband installed and they are letting this go ahead while I am still in the property - specifically, TWO MONTHS before I move out.

    I have NEVER heard of this being allowed and I had to wait til I moved in to do it myself. Two months in advance also seems highly excessive - AND I see it causing a headache with billing and risks me being cut off early as it's the same internet provider (who from my experience aren't the most intelligent - my sign up and installation was a bit 'Chuckle Brothers' to put it politely.)

    Can I just refuse access until I've moved out? I have been VERY polite regarding their viewings - some of which don't happen, others have 6 hours notice, and others rock up completely unannounced! I have refused a couple of them that were unannounced but generally I've just let it go as I want to end on friendly terms...But now I feel like they're just taking the mickey... If there even is really new tenants, as they sometimes have the properties mixed up and have told me about viewings that don't even exist and was for a completely different building!

    But anyway, my question is - can I legally refuse to let my agent and any contractors/workers access my home for ANYTHING that doesn't relate to me and my tenancy, while I still live here?

    Thank you
Page 1
    • ThePants999
    • By ThePants999 11th Jul 17, 8:13 PM
    • 900 Posts
    • 1,054 Thanks
    ThePants999
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:13 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:13 PM
    Yup. Strictly speaking, if your tenancy agreement contains a provision for them to enter, and this satisfies the requirements of the relevant clause, you'd be in breach of the tenancy agreement if you denied them entry. But absolutely nothing will come of that since you're leaving anyway! In the vanishingly small chance that they took you to court for it, they'd have to prove that the tenancy agreement was reasonable (and allowing access solely for the the benefit of a future tenant surely would not be!) and they'd have to prove that they'd suffered a loss from your action (which it's extraordinarily unlikely they'd be able to do).

    Edit: to be clear, "in breach of the tenancy agreement" does NOT mean "illegal".
    Last edited by ThePants999; 11-07-2017 at 8:21 PM.
    • Cheeky_Monkey
    • By Cheeky_Monkey 11th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    • 1,407 Posts
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    Cheeky_Monkey
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    Tell them to jog on. I doubt very much if there's anything in your tenancy agreement that allows them access unless it's an emergency. I hope they haven't got a key
    • nnb
    • By nnb 11th Jul 17, 8:25 PM
    • 46 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    nnb
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:25 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:25 PM
    Yup. Strictly speaking, if your tenancy agreement contains a provision for them to enter, and this satisfies the requirements of the relevant clause, you'd be in breach of the tenancy agreement if you denied them entry. But absolutely nothing will come of that since you're leaving anyway! In the vanishingly small chance that they took you to court for it, they'd have to prove that the tenancy agreement was reasonable (and allowing access solely for the the benefit of a future tenant surely would not be!) and they'd have to prove that they'd suffered a loss from your action (which it's extraordinarily unlikely they'd be able to do).

    Edit: to be clear, "in breach of the tenancy agreement" does NOT mean "illegal".
    Originally posted by ThePants999
    Yes, sorry, that was bad phrasing on my part when I said 'legally'. I obviously meant regarding my contract - although I also wondered if it wasn't clear, would I legally be allowed to refuse access Sorry for the confusion!

    Tell them to jog on. I doubt very much if there's anything in your tenancy agreement that allows them access unless it's an emergency. I hope they haven't got a key
    Originally posted by Cheeky_Monkey
    Sadly they do, as do the maintenance people - and random contractors, as I recently found out when someone came out and I found out had random keys that worked on most of our doors?! And I can't change the blasted thing either as it's not a standard lock. (And changing it would probably get me in trouble anyway.) It's pretty damn scary as I am a female living alone, knowing god knows how many random men have keys to my home! Wouldn't surprise me if they give the internet guy a key just so they don't have to come out with him.
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 11th Jul 17, 8:30 PM
    • 2,933 Posts
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    t0rt0ise
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:30 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:30 PM
    What are they actually going to do to install broadband? All sounds a bit strange.
    • nnb
    • By nnb 11th Jul 17, 8:34 PM
    • 46 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    nnb
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:34 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:34 PM
    What are they actually going to do to install broadband? All sounds a bit strange.
    Originally posted by t0rt0ise
    I had to have those little boxes fitted to the wall and some cabling done outside when I had it put in... (It's a crap building and the outside bit wasn't working and this IP had never installed in our block so apparently needed their own cabling done...) It does seem weird to me that the new people couldn't just book the installation for the day they move in, it's usually a 2 week wait so they could easily pick a date and time in September if they were ordering it now.
    • ThePants999
    • By ThePants999 11th Jul 17, 8:36 PM
    • 900 Posts
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    ThePants999
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:36 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:36 PM
    Not being a "standard lock" doesn't mean you can't change it. Hell, you could replace the entire door if you wanted to, as long as you put the old one back when you left!
    • nnb
    • By nnb 11th Jul 17, 8:41 PM
    • 46 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    nnb
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:41 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:41 PM
    Not being a "standard lock" doesn't mean you can't change it. Hell, you could replace the entire door if you wanted to, as long as you put the old one back when you left!
    Originally posted by ThePants999
    I can't even get my key cut as no keycutter can do it (a lot of students pass through so I guess the LA use this type of lock so they don't have to worry about untrustworthy past tenants - not that I'm judging students! It's just the only theory I've come up with and all keycutters I've asked to cut it have said I must be in student accommodation!)

    I will have another look into it though... Although I do have a feeling my agreement says I wasn't allowed (or I would have to give them copies if I did) - I presume if I ignore the agreement and change the locks and don't give my LA copies, this would not bode well for me? I've never had an issue in the past with giving copies to other LAs when housemates/exes moved out but I've never had to want to keep an LA out before so this is new territory for me!
    • ThePants999
    • By ThePants999 11th Jul 17, 9:05 PM
    • 900 Posts
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    ThePants999
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:05 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:05 PM
    I understand you have a non-standard lock so can't get a key cut. But it would have to be very non-standard indeed for you to be unable to remove the entire lock from the door and put a different lock in its place!

    While you're the tenant, it's your home. The landlord will have no recourse if you change the lock and don't provide a key except to evict you - and you're leaving anyway, so that's hardly a consequence you fear You just have to return things to how they were when you leave, otherwise they can claim their costs back from you.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 11th Jul 17, 9:11 PM
    • 15,118 Posts
    • 14,765 Thanks
    Guest101
    What ThePants999 said - thanks for typing it out perfectly
    • HB58
    • By HB58 11th Jul 17, 9:15 PM
    • 1,751 Posts
    • 1,623 Thanks
    HB58
    The only way anyone would know you had changed the lock would be if they tried to enter without permission . . .
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 12th Jul 17, 12:06 AM
    • 2,839 Posts
    • 2,873 Thanks
    cjdavies
    I'm curious how these other people have spare keys if keyncutters cannot do one for you.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 12th Jul 17, 6:51 AM
    • 6,387 Posts
    • 5,159 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    Tell the letting agent the new tenant can have access when they start paying the rent. Until then you have the right to quiet enjoyment of your home.

    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/housing/renting-a-home/student-housing/students-in-private-rented-accommodation/student-housing-unacceptable-behaviour-by-your-landlord/
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 12th Jul 17, 6:59 AM
    • 3,435 Posts
    • 6,386 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    I'm curious how these other people have spare keys if keyncutters cannot do one for you.
    Originally posted by cjdavies
    Presumably they were acquired when the lock was bought. Usually more than one key is supplied. Or perhaps they have to be cut from the 'master key' held by the landlord ?
    • Wanderingpomm
    • By Wanderingpomm 12th Jul 17, 7:40 AM
    • 48 Posts
    • 35 Thanks
    Wanderingpomm
    It will definite cut off your account so try and stop them. I know because when I moved in there was an account in my landladies name virgin wouldn't let us change. So I started a new one and voila, end of old contract.
    • Wanderingpomm
    • By Wanderingpomm 12th Jul 17, 7:41 AM
    • 48 Posts
    • 35 Thanks
    Wanderingpomm
    It will definitely cut off your account so try and stop them. I know because when I moved in there was an account in my landladies name virgin wouldn't let us change. So I started a new one and voila, end of old contract.
    • aneary
    • By aneary 12th Jul 17, 7:47 AM
    • 799 Posts
    • 699 Thanks
    aneary
    It will definitely cut off your account so try and stop them. I know because when I moved in there was an account in my landladies name virgin wouldn't let us change. So I started a new one and voila, end of old contract.
    Originally posted by Wanderingpomm
    Only if its the same supplier.

    OP - say no, the LA are idiots anyway, currently you could stay beyond your leave date or the next tenants could decide not to move in. They will have to be like everyone else and wait till they move in. I'm moving and although the flat is empty I wouldn't even dream of booking my internet instillation until I have move in, provisionally my is booked for 2 weeks after I have the keys due to an overlap in my current flat.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 12th Jul 17, 11:50 AM
    • 6,387 Posts
    • 5,159 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    I'm curious how these other people have spare keys if keyncutters cannot do one for you.
    Originally posted by cjdavies
    The key blanks are different and presumably not widely available. The keys can be bought but are only supplied to businesses or organisations who can demonstrate they manage the property.

    Its odd that individual flats are fitted with security keys. Replacing a euro lock is likely to be little more expensive than security locks and keys. I would suspect these were fitted due to overly intrusive or dictative management.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • CM66
    • By CM66 12th Jul 17, 4:58 PM
    • 506 Posts
    • 2,984 Thanks
    CM66
    Ignoring the entry issue, tell the landlord that you are using the broadband and it cant be changed until you move out. Unless the new tenants are panning on installing a new phone line, they can't add or change anything and have no right to do it as they don't live there!
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