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  • FIRST POST
    • katy123
    • By katy123 11th Jul 17, 6:13 PM
    • 206Posts
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    katy123
    Buying a smaller property with a view to extending it
    • #1
    • 11th Jul 17, 6:13 PM
    Buying a smaller property with a view to extending it 11th Jul 17 at 6:13 PM
    Hi

    I just wanted to understand the whole process. We're well into our house hunt and was wondering if we can adopt the strategy of buying a smaller (=cheaper) property with a view to extending it to a 4 bed. The price difference is around £75k. So it will be a 3 bed with scope to extend. The only risk I see in this strategy is what if planning permission isn't granted? I know people normally say just see if any other house has done it on the street. But are there are other more proven methods I can minimise the risk? The last thing I want is to buy, apply and get rejected, which would mean wasted time, stamp duty and hassle. Thanks for sharing.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Jul 17, 6:50 PM
    • 23,959 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 17, 6:50 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 17, 6:50 PM
    The Planning Portal contains information about Permitted Development And what is allowed.

    Local authorities also have something called Strategic Planning Guidance on their website. This should contain a section on extensions and shows what they would usually expect.

    Some LA's offer planning surgeries where you can pop along and chat to a olanning officer, but these are becoming less common.

    You can apply for pre-application advice on whether a scheme stands to be approved. This is chargeable, usually and takes some time to come back. You probably want to submit a proper scheme in conjunction with an architect.

    You can ask an architect out to look at a property, but do look at the guidance available on the internet first, so that you can at least get an incling of what might be allowed.

    Be careful with budgets. £75k doesn't go a long way on a two storey extension.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 11-07-2017 at 6:53 PM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Slithery
    • By Slithery 11th Jul 17, 7:06 PM
    • 284 Posts
    • 358 Thanks
    Slithery
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 7:06 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 7:06 PM
    You could always try and gain planning permission before purchasing the property
    • Bluebell1000
    • By Bluebell1000 11th Jul 17, 8:02 PM
    • 654 Posts
    • 1,884 Thanks
    Bluebell1000
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:02 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:02 PM

    Be careful with budgets. £75k doesn't go a long way on a two storey extension.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    That probably depends on where you are in the country. Our two storey extension in the East Mids cost about £50k all in 3 years ago (extra bedroom upstairs, kitchen, porch, toilet and large conservatory downstairs).
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 11th Jul 17, 8:07 PM
    • 6,066 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:07 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:07 PM
    You could always try and gain planning permission before purchasing the property
    Originally posted by Slithery
    Indeed, the only no-risk method is to make a conditional offer, and get the seller into a contract while you sort out planning - but how attractive is that going to be to the sellers if other buyers are happy to take it as it is?
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 11th Jul 17, 8:11 PM
    • 9,891 Posts
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    lincroft1710
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:11 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 17, 8:11 PM
    A 3 bed extended house is rarely as good as purpose built 4 bed.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 11th Jul 17, 9:27 PM
    • 7,541 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:27 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:27 PM
    A 3 bed extended house is rarely as good as purpose built 4 bed.
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    Depends on what you want - a lot of 4-bedroom houses are actually no bigger than a 3-bed in total size.

    And if you want hobbies rooms etc then a ground floor extension can provide that extra living space without the premium you would pay for a house with more bedrooms.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Jul 17, 9:34 PM
    • 23,959 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:34 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:34 PM
    A 3 bed extended house is rarely as good as purpose built 4 bed.
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    I think that's a poor generalisation.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Jul 17, 9:35 PM
    • 23,959 Posts
    • 66,521 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:35 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 17, 9:35 PM
    That probably depends on where you are in the country. Our two storey extension in the East Mids cost about £50k all in 3 years ago (extra bedroom upstairs, kitchen, porch, toilet and large conservatory downstairs).
    Originally posted by Bluebell1000
    You are certainly the exception, rather than the rule. That would be hard to achieve anywhere.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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