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    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 11:42 AM
    • 148Posts
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    higgledypiggledy_pop
    Can I terminate my tenant's tenancy early for having an unauthorised pet?
    • #1
    • 10th Jul 17, 11:42 AM
    Can I terminate my tenant's tenancy early for having an unauthorised pet? 10th Jul 17 at 11:42 AM
    I am renting a flat to a couple on a 12 month tenancy agreement. When they applied they did not say anything about having a pet and in the tenancy agreement it states that tenants must get permission for any pets from the landlord first. I have been informed by a neighbour that one of the tenants has been seen going in and out of the flat with a dog, and the dog has also been seen in the garden. I asked the tenants about it and they claimed that it didn't belong to them but was a friend's who had been visiting or had left the dog there for a short time. I told them that I did not want a dog in the flat at all even if it was a friend's and that they should stop allowing the friend to bring the dog in, but it has been seen again since by my neighbour who watches and keeps me informed, when the woman tenant is around she often seems to have the dog with her.
    I think that the dog is probably really theirs or has been staying with them and I don't want it there. How can I go about ending their tenancy for breach of contract? Will I have to obtain proof that the dog is there? Does it matter legally whether it belongs to them or not?
    They also pre-paid all 12 months of their rent before moving in and have eight months remaining on the tenancy, will this make it harder for me to get them out?
Page 9
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 7:39 PM
    • 148 Posts
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    higgledypiggledy_pop
    yes it does, it means your agent has no authority at all to deduct rent from the tenant as the LL is UK resident and should calculating and declaring their own rental profit via their own tax return.

    you are UK tax resident but have no idea what an NI number is? You have now drip fed another bit of info, that you are no longer abroad, Further reinforces the views taken by some on here that this is not real as no one can mess it up this much.

    Have fun dealing with HMRC, they will run rings around you.
    Originally posted by 00ec25
    OK, NI number stands for national insurance number. I have heard of it but I can not remember giving it out. I have not had much cause to use these things as I have never technically been 'employed'. I am beginning to think I may have been wrong to trust this agent.
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 7:43 PM
    • 148 Posts
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    higgledypiggledy_pop
    And he never sold it to me as a non-resident landlord scheme, just some administrative deal where they would sort out any taxes for me. Maybe I am ignorant, but that does not mean I deserve to be savagely mocked for my mistakes!!
    • Glbooth3
    • By Glbooth3 10th Jul 17, 7:44 PM
    • 43 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    Glbooth3
    Just out of curiosity how old are u and was your home passed down to you? NI is basic knowledge and even though I am very early on in the home owner territory I know all that info was needed massively for me to buy a house, get a mortgage etc....reason between the lines it sounds like this is a flat you inherited and then someone called u with something u have little experience in and it all sounded too good to be true you couldn't wait to get in on earning some easy money...
    • elsien
    • By elsien 10th Jul 17, 7:45 PM
    • 15,293 Posts
    • 38,394 Thanks
    elsien
    I do apologise, why don't I ask my tenants to add some hypoallergenic rats and their army of friendly fleas to the petting zoo they are creating in my ancestral home.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    Your ancestral home? It's a flat you're renting out not flipping Balmoral.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 10th Jul 17, 7:52 PM
    • 5,353 Posts
    • 4,696 Thanks
    00ec25
    OK, NI number stands for national insurance number. I have heard of it but I can not remember giving it out. I have not had much cause to use these things as I have never technically been 'employed'. I am beginning to think I may have been wrong to trust this agent.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    sorry but I find it impossible to believe anyone who has an ancestral home in the UK does not know what an NI number is, and moreover if you have never been technically employed, then you must have been technically self employed, in which case you would have detailed and intimate knowledge of tax returns and NI since you'd be paying NI as a self employed person every quarter and do a tax return every year.

    I'm out,
    Last edited by 00ec25; 14-07-2017 at 1:20 AM.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 10th Jul 17, 7:55 PM
    • 2,030 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    It could be explained by inheritances and trust funds. It would be consistent with what they are claiming.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jul 17, 8:06 PM
    • 11,104 Posts
    • 15,380 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    It could be explained by inheritances and trust funds. It would be consistent with what they are claiming.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Don't those sorts of people have solicitors and accountants to protect them from themselves?
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 10th Jul 17, 8:09 PM
    • 3,047 Posts
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    gettingtheresometime
    I believe some councils collect dog poo and test its DNA to find dog owners that are not picking up after their dog. So it could be easy
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    I've always wondered how a dog's DNA is captured in its poo.....but I digress
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    Just out of curiosity how old are u and was your home passed down to you? NI is basic knowledge and even though I am very early on in the home owner territory I know all that info was needed massively for me to buy a house, get a mortgage etc....reason between the lines it sounds like this is a flat you inherited and then someone called u with something u have little experience in and it all sounded too good to be true you couldn't wait to get in on earning some easy money...
    Originally posted by Glbooth3
    Yes, it was inherited as part of a larger estate, some of which had to be sold off. My late brother organised all things financial and the splitting of the main house. Perhaps there is some truth in what 'u' say and I should have been more careful, but renting was just not something that I had thought of before so I had very little idea of what I was doing. Now I seem to be left with a huge tax blunder as well as some wretched direwolf toasting its paws over the hearth and damn all I can do about it.
    • Glbooth3
    • By Glbooth3 10th Jul 17, 8:37 PM
    • 43 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    Glbooth3
    Well I hope it's sorted for you, write down an action plan

    1. Ring estate agents tomorrow, if can't get hold of by phone then see website for email etc...even send someone local round to them...ask for all receipts, invoices, everything from them...will help you calculate tax amount etc owed (if no experience get a trusted accountant)
    2. Once you have records of all above them contact HMRC, pointless until you know exact figures of what's been earnt, HMRC aren't monsters they just want to collect tax, and will notify you of close to exact figures. Send payment ASAP this sorts that link in the chain.

    3. Contact tenants, they may be on your wavelength and are planning on what to do once 12 months is up. only when you know what their plan is can you action anything. Legally yes, you might have to get court involved etc but don't jump the gun until you get all info....

    After this experience get a new estate agent pay more attention to what's being done, it's not something you can bury your head in the sand with, hope you get it sorted
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 8:40 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    If that furniture was so important to you then you shouldn't have left it in the property. Even if the tenant didn't have a dog, the furniture could still get damaged.

    Domestic rats do not spread the plague that is a ridiculous thing to state. If that was the case I'd be long gone as I've kept rats for more than 15 years.

    I value my animals just as much, if not more, than you value your precious furniture.
    If you valued it that much you wouldn't have left it in the property to potentially get damaged.
    Originally posted by LuckyG
    Hindsight is a wonderful thing! But the furniture is part and parcel of the property, it can't just be moved. The four poster bed is physically affixed to the floor and ceiling, though it isn't much good for sleeping in if you're over 5 foot tall.
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 8:44 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    Well I hope it's sorted for you, write down an action plan

    1. Ring estate agents tomorrow, if can't get hold of by phone then see website for email etc...even send someone local round to them...ask for all receipts, invoices, everything from them...will help you calculate tax amount etc owed (if no experience get a trusted accountant)
    2. Once you have records of all above them contact HMRC, pointless until you know exact figures of what's been earnt, HMRC aren't monsters they just want to collect tax, and will notify you of close to exact figures. Send payment ASAP this sorts that link in the chain.

    3. Contact tenants, they may be on your wavelength and are planning on what to do once 12 months is up. only when you know what their plan is can you action anything. Legally yes, you might have to get court involved etc but don't jump the gun until you get all info....

    After this experience get a new estate agent pay more attention to what's being done, it's not something you can bury your head in the sand with, hope you get it sorted
    Originally posted by Glbooth3
    The problem with stage 1 of this is that I can't get in touch with them (him) at all, I have left 20 answerphone messages and no response - I remember they had a very professional looking website which is no longer available and I can't find any documentation whatsoever apart from the contract with does not mention them.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 10th Jul 17, 8:46 PM
    • 1,514 Posts
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    Penitent
    Hindsight is a wonderful thing! But the furniture is part and parcel of the property, it can't just be moved. The four poster bed is physically affixed to the floor and ceiling, though it isn't much good for sleeping in if you're over 5 foot tall.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    In that case, I think it would be better for the tenants' health if they bought their own bed and let the wolfdog sleep in the four poster. Can't expect two adults to sleep in a kids' bed.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jul 17, 8:47 PM
    • 11,104 Posts
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    Pixie5740
    If all else fails you can always set your dragons on the tenants, their direwolf - I mean Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, and the letting agent. In fact whilst you're at it feel free to take out HMRC, preferably before I have to pay my next bill.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • Glbooth3
    • By Glbooth3 10th Jul 17, 8:49 PM
    • 43 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    Glbooth3
    No address for it or anything? No name of a worker there? If you got a number stick it in google, may bring link up to a worker or the old website or something....or some other info you could possibly google and find out more, or better still give it me, I Should of been a detective, so nosy and it's Amazin how much info can be gained by googling bits and piecin it together. Searching on Facebook if you have any names can also bring up links to businesses etc
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 8:58 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    No address for it or anything? No name of a worker there? If you got a number stick it in google, may bring link up to a worker or the old website or something....or some other info you could possibly google and find out more, or better still give it me, I Should of been a detective, so nosy and it's Amazin how much info can be gained by googling bits and piecin it together. Searching on Facebook if you have any names can also bring up links to businesses etc
    Originally posted by Glbooth3
    I do have the agent's name, but not a Facebook. Judging from the conversation I had with HMRC an hour ago I think there is more to it than a filing error and I may have to contact the police.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 10th Jul 17, 9:02 PM
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    cjdavies
    But it says in the contract that the agreement can be terminated by the landlord with two month's notice...? I am so confused by this, is it really true that a 12 month agreement effectively runs forever unless the tenant or court ends it? Why is it called a 12 month contract and not a lifetime contract?? How is it right that the tenant can stay after 12 months ends when there is no contract in place and if I am politely and with two month's notice asking them to leave?
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop

    I am experiencing all this right now when people start being a landlord and have basic questions - meaning they don't bother researching and just think, I move out, people move in and pay me.
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 9:05 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    In that case, I think it would be better for the tenants' health if they bought their own bed and let the wolfdog sleep in the four poster. Can't expect two adults to sleep in a kids' bed.
    Originally posted by Penitent
    There is a good king sized bed in the another room, I would not expect them to sleep in the antique bed - but the thought of ANIMALS sleeping in it is very unwelcome, it has an original C18th stuffed mattress and ruining something like that with fleas and smells is just not amusing.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 10th Jul 17, 9:17 PM
    • 710 Posts
    • 256 Thanks
    sevenhills
    There is a good king sized bed in the another room, I would not expect them to sleep in the antique bed - but the thought of ANIMALS sleeping in it is very unwelcome, it has an original C18th stuffed mattress and ruining something like that with fleas and smells is just not amusing.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    If you value these things, perhaps you should have watched more TV.

    Later, they head to Essex to track down the tenants of a country estate who owe their landlord more than £10,000 - but have since disappeared.
    Paul and Steve attend an eviction in Buckinghamshire where the tenant owes more than £26,000 in rent on his country estate residence.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Can%27t_Pay%3F_We%27ll_Take_It_Away!
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 9:28 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    If all else fails you can always set your dragons on the tenants, their direwolf - I mean Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, and the letting agent. In fact whilst you're at it feel free to take out HMRC, preferably before I have to pay my next bill.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    I'm glad you are having a very merry evening.
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