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    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 11:42 AM
    • 148Posts
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    higgledypiggledy_pop
    Can I terminate my tenant's tenancy early for having an unauthorised pet?
    • #1
    • 10th Jul 17, 11:42 AM
    Can I terminate my tenant's tenancy early for having an unauthorised pet? 10th Jul 17 at 11:42 AM
    I am renting a flat to a couple on a 12 month tenancy agreement. When they applied they did not say anything about having a pet and in the tenancy agreement it states that tenants must get permission for any pets from the landlord first. I have been informed by a neighbour that one of the tenants has been seen going in and out of the flat with a dog, and the dog has also been seen in the garden. I asked the tenants about it and they claimed that it didn't belong to them but was a friend's who had been visiting or had left the dog there for a short time. I told them that I did not want a dog in the flat at all even if it was a friend's and that they should stop allowing the friend to bring the dog in, but it has been seen again since by my neighbour who watches and keeps me informed, when the woman tenant is around she often seems to have the dog with her.
    I think that the dog is probably really theirs or has been staying with them and I don't want it there. How can I go about ending their tenancy for breach of contract? Will I have to obtain proof that the dog is there? Does it matter legally whether it belongs to them or not?
    They also pre-paid all 12 months of their rent before moving in and have eight months remaining on the tenancy, will this make it harder for me to get them out?
Page 5
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 10th Jul 17, 2:57 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    You could tell the agency you rent through that the tenants have got a dog - against the terms of the contract, and let the professionals advise you. - Professionals, hahahaha...


    You could potentially give permission for the dog (as it already there) - this may not be required, OP still hasn't given the exact wording of the clause. , but ask for a bigger deposit to cover the potential damage (This would also need to be protected) and add an amendment that the tenants must get the flat professionally cleaned,
    Originally posted by Tammykitty
    That amendment would be unenforceable.
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 2:58 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    I'm taking everything the OP says with a pinch of salt. We don't even know if the tenant really exists, let alone that they said it was a Czech Wolfdog. Now with the OPs DNA testing comment I think its all bull$h1t anyway.
    Originally posted by lovinituk
    I said that the only way to know would be to DNA test which is obviously not practical and would not seem to be very relevant anyway, since the tenants are free to stay as long as they want and start their petting zoo, maybe forever since 12 month contracts don't really exist and none of the words in them mean anything.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 10th Jul 17, 3:00 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    I said that the only way to know would be to DNA test which is obviously not practical and would not seem to be very relevant anyway, since the tenants are free to stay as long as they want and start their petting zoo, maybe forever since 12 month contracts don't really exist and none of the words in them mean anything.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop


    Stick the dummy back in.
    • lovinituk
    • By lovinituk 10th Jul 17, 3:00 PM
    • 5,371 Posts
    • 6,037 Thanks
    lovinituk
    I said that the only way to know would be to DNA test which is obviously not practical and would not seem to be very relevant anyway, since the tenants are free to stay as long as they want and start their petting zoo, maybe forever since 12 month contracts don't really exist and none of the words in them mean anything.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    I've lost interest now. Take the advice, sell up - you're not cut out for landlording. (Yes, I'm a landlord and yes, our tenants have pets).
    • higgledypiggledy_pop
    • By higgledypiggledy_pop 10th Jul 17, 3:03 PM
    • 148 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    higgledypiggledy_pop
    You could tell the agency you rent through that the tenants have got a dog - against the terms of the contract, and let the professionals advise you.


    You could potentially give permission for the dog (as it already there), but ask for a bigger deposit to cover the potential damage (This would also need to be protected) and add an amendment that the tenants must get the flat professionally cleaned,
    Originally posted by Tammykitty
    Now that they have found a tenant they don't want to hear any more about it because I didn't pay for their full management package. They literally came to me soliciting for business and persuaded me to rent my flat out while I am away. They never said that 12 months is not 12 months. I don't know if they are even operating any more. I wish I had never got involved
    • pimento
    • By pimento 10th Jul 17, 3:05 PM
    • 5,186 Posts
    • 6,736 Thanks
    pimento
    In case the dog is pooping or peeing in the garden.

    In case the dog is damaging items inside the place.

    In case the dog is being allowed to bark.

    Because the dog will probably be making the place smell "doggy".

    EDIT; and I've now read that the dog is indeed barking (or, to be more exact, howling) and that would upset me that an innocent neighbour was being disturbed when I knew they werent due to be (ie because I'd specified no dogs).

    Also - with OP being allergic to them - then she has every entitlement to replace the carpets afterwards and have the place professionally cleaned.

    Add the fact that the tenant has proved they tell lies.

    My sympathies - and I would want them out pronto - and the main reason would be because I'd found out they are the sort of person that tells lies/takes me for an idiot that would believe lies.

    In the circumstances I would be going round to talk to them personally and telling them I knew very well that they had told me a lie and that had made me angry with them. Tell them I have very valid reasons for specifying no pets in the contract - ie my allergy and protecting my garden from toileting and my home from smelling doggy and say that they had the shortest possible notice period I could legally give them to get out. Followed by telling them the costs they would already incur for new carpets/professional cleaning/any putting right the garden and that I suggested they don't try and "stand on their rights/forget their responsibilities" or I'd be looking to see if I could get compensation as well for problems/hassle they were causing me and see if I could ensure an accurate reference about them got passed onto potential future landlords.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    That sounds like harassment to me. What happened to quiet enjoyment?
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Jul 17, 3:08 PM
    • 13,422 Posts
    • 36,577 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    What happened to telling the truth? - ie the tenants committed themselves to not having a pet and are now lying and saying they don't have one
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 10th Jul 17, 3:12 PM
    • 3,709 Posts
    • 7,468 Thanks
    DaftyDuck
    I seriously hope the tenants come on this forum and get advice to tell you to F......
    Originally posted by Guest101
    Ah, I see Guest has found it really was a werewolf!
    • pimento
    • By pimento 10th Jul 17, 3:12 PM
    • 5,186 Posts
    • 6,736 Thanks
    pimento
    Well not telling the truth isn't against the law whereas harassment is.
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
    • fairy lights
    • By fairy lights 10th Jul 17, 3:17 PM
    • 8,020 Posts
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    fairy lights
    So in the space of a few hours the tenants gone from having one dog who might shed a bit of hair and necessitate a carpet clean, to having a wolf-hybrid who is eyeing up the neighbours for dinner and destroying the building from the inside out. (according to the totally reliable and not at all gossipy next door neighbour.)
    And OP can never ever evict them because contracts are lies and words no longer have any meaning.
    • aneary
    • By aneary 10th Jul 17, 3:19 PM
    • 480 Posts
    • 338 Thanks
    aneary
    This is priceless!!! Perfect for a Monday.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 10th Jul 17, 3:23 PM
    • 1,360 Posts
    • 4,135 Thanks
    Penitent
    9/10 (Tesco bag for life is required to achieve 10/10).
    • *~Zephyr~*
    • By *~Zephyr~* 10th Jul 17, 3:25 PM
    • 576 Posts
    • 1,130 Thanks
    *~Zephyr~*
    Despite the OP's total lack of understanding or comprehension of the legalities of being Landlord, I'm sure they are filing their tax return and paying their taxes every year.

    And they definitely would have told their lender that they rent out the flat and have obtained their Consent to Let.

    Haven't they?
    • SuboJvR
    • By SuboJvR 10th Jul 17, 3:29 PM
    • 350 Posts
    • 238 Thanks
    SuboJvR
    Now that they have found a tenant they don't want to hear any more about it because I didn't pay for their full management package. They literally came to me soliciting for business and persuaded me to rent my flat out while I am away. They never said that 12 months is not 12 months. I don't know if they are even operating any more. I wish I had never got involved
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    As a tenant...

    (and I don't know why I'm replying again, as you've ignored my offerings completely thus far)

    The 12 month is a fixed term. So, both you and the tenant have security that they will be there for 12 months.

    It is quite normal at the end of this term to either:
    - Seek to extend the term, i.e. sign another fixed term contract
    or
    - let the tenancy become periodic. Month by month. The tenant must then provide a minimum of one month before vacating, and you must serve them 2 months' notice that you would like them to vacate. The tenant does not legally have to leave at this point, especially if they are paying rent. If they do not leave, you can then apply to evict. It is not a "forever contract" however the law does protect tenants to the extent that they are the ones living in the property, it is their home, and they cannot just be summarily booted out with little notice and then have nowhere else to go.
    or
    - tenant just moves out, on the last day of the term. They don't need to tell you if they wish to do this.

    You should accept that for the time being, it is not your home. It is theirs, but it is your house.

    And ultimately, it is in your interest to be nice to them, because happy tenants look after homes, and can be helpful when the time comes for you to want to find new tenants, or not helpful at all. ("Oh yes, the landlord was really nice about our dog actually, we increased the deposit and will make sure we get carpets cleaned but he was fine with it." versus "Landlord is horrible, I wouldn't bother renting this place if I were you, made our lives incredibly stressful, neighbours were spying on us and reporting back, not worth the hassle.")
    Last edited by SuboJvR; 10-07-2017 at 3:32 PM.
    • camptownraces
    • By camptownraces 10th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
    • 310 Posts
    • 187 Thanks
    camptownraces

    I'm saying, why would I need to get the courts involved after the 8 months, since I can just give them notice to leave when their contract is up? Maybe it's a joke and I don't get it.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    No, it's not a joke, and you don't get it.

    You, the landlord, can't get the tenants out unless you go to court and are awarded a possession order. If the tenants don't go voluntarily you may need to get bailiffs in.

    If tenants give you a month's notice that they intend to leave after the fixed term ends, then they can of course leave. They could leave at the end of the fixed term without giving notice.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 10th Jul 17, 4:15 PM
    • 41,070 Posts
    • 47,188 Thanks
    G_M
    9/10 (Tesco bag for life is required to achieve 10/10).
    Originally posted by Penitent
    Disagree. Barely a 4/10.

    TBFL might scrape it up to 5 but not really in the same class at all.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jul 17, 4:17 PM
    • 10,823 Posts
    • 14,955 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    Now that they have found a tenant they don't want to hear any more about it because I didn't pay for their full management package. They literally came to me soliciting for business and persuaded me to rent my flat out while I am away. They never said that 12 months is not 12 months. I don't know if they are even operating any more. I wish I had never got involved
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    Really? How did the letting agency know you were going to be away?

    You opted for the tenant finder package and that's what the letting agency did. If you didn't want to pay for the fully managed service you should have done some very basic research before the tenancy started. You didn't and now you are where you are.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jul 17, 4:18 PM
    • 10,823 Posts
    • 14,955 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    What I am saying is that I don't understand Guest101's statement:
    "Also sell up once you do legally evict them, in about 12-14 months, via the courts"

    The poster says that I shouldn't bother trying to get them out (they have 8 months left on contract), then says I should evict them through the courts and sell up! I'm saying, why would I need to get the courts involved after the 8 months, since I can just give them notice to leave when their contract is up? Maybe it's a joke and I don't get it.
    Originally posted by higgledypiggledy_pop
    It's not a joke and would make perfect sense when you read the information in the links that you've been given 3 times now.

    I suggest you read all the information in the other links G_M also gave you before you try taking any action against the tenants.

    Once you know your !!!! from your elbow write to the tenants giving them the required 24 hours notice and go and inspect the property.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 10th Jul 17, 4:35 PM
    • 15,791 Posts
    • 39,492 Thanks
    FBaby
    No one is winning in such instance. OP will eventually get his property back even if he then has to change all the carpets. The tensnts will have to find somewhere ultimately and pay court fees.

    If you're a tenant, decide to get a dog and lie about it you are settling yourself for a stressful life potentially heaving to mice at cost every year. I would think a better idea to be honest from the start or of course not gets dog. OH and I would love to have one but work FT in the dat time so we have to accept it's not for us.
    • fairy lights
    • By fairy lights 10th Jul 17, 4:41 PM
    • 8,020 Posts
    • 26,739 Thanks
    fairy lights
    No one is winning in such instance. OP will eventually get his property back even if he then has to change all the carpets. The tensnts will have to find somewhere ultimately and pay court fees.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    Why will the tenants have to pay court fees? OP hasn't even served notice yet, let alone got to the stage of starting court proceedings.
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