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    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 9th Jul 17, 11:34 PM
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    steve1ae
    Advice on requesting tree removal
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 17, 11:34 PM
    Advice on requesting tree removal 9th Jul 17 at 11:34 PM
    Hi Everyone,

    We border a local school who have six leylandii trees hanging over our garden (approx 20-30 ft tall). I'm considering writing to the school to request they fell the tress. I'm not sure how best to approach it.

    I was wondering if anyone has been in a similar situation and managed to find an amicable solution?

    Many thanks for your help
    Last edited by steve1ae; 10-07-2017 at 11:41 AM. Reason: Making the post clearer
Page 2
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:54 AM
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    steve1ae
    Schools do have money, including the school fund, typically boosted by parents via the PTA. Regardless of the actual 'pot,' the school will be liable for grounds maintenance

    Some of those parents will probably be close neighbours of the OP, and they wouldn't be too delighted to see 'their' money being spent on a project like tree reduction.

    For that reason, it would be politic to offer to fund the reduction and distinctly more likely that it would be allowed to take place.

    It's probably too late for this year, as such matters would need discussion with governors etc....and they're probably all on holiday prior to term ending and prices shooting-up!
    Originally posted by Davesnave

    Thank-you very much
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 10th Jul 17, 11:55 AM
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    Grenage
    The trees are almost certainly not going to fall on your children; a discussion with the school is your only real option.

    Bear in mind that leylandii when cut back will not regrow from old wood, and probably look monstrous.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 10th Jul 17, 12:07 PM
    • 28,524 Posts
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    Mojisola
    Ad did give me great advice and I'm very grateful. Of course you're welcome to voice your opinion but you're offering suggestions to problems I haven't identified.
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    But they are questions you might be asked.

    I was a governor at our local school for many years. We had twenty plus large trees on our boundary which was the back fence of a row of houses.

    If we'd been approached by a new purchaser asking us to spend money to cut down some of the trees, I'd have asked the questions of them that I've asked here. I would also assume that the trees couldn't be that much of a problem or the house sale wouldn't have gone through.

    If we couldn't see a serious problem with the safety of the trees, we wouldn't have spent money on taking them down - leylandiis look awful when they are cut back. The most we would have done is to pay for a safety check.

    If a new neighbour came to us with an offer to pay for the trees to be removed and replaced with some more suitable trees, we would have seriously considered it.
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 12:15 PM
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    steve1ae
    But they are questions you might be asked.

    I was a governor at our local school for many years. We had twenty plus large trees on our boundary which was the back fence of a row of houses.

    If we'd been approached by a new purchaser asking us to spend money to cut down some of the trees, I'd have asked the questions of them that I've asked here. I would also assume that the trees couldn't be that much of a problem or the house sale wouldn't have gone through.

    If we couldn't see a serious problem with the safety of the trees, we wouldn't have spent money on taking them down - leylandiis look awful when they are cut back. The most we would have done is to pay for a safety check.

    If a new neighbour came to us with an offer to pay for the trees to be removed and replaced with some more suitable trees, we would have seriously considered it.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Thank-you very much. Interesting ref the safety check. i would be more than happy with that. I would also be happy to pay myself. I didn't want to get of on the wrong foot with the school so your advice here and the advice from others is exactly what I was looking for.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 10th Jul 17, 12:20 PM
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    Aylesbury Duck
    If a new neighbour came to us with an offer to pay for the trees to be removed and replaced with some more suitable trees, we would have seriously considered it.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    If this is affordable to the OP, then it's a good idea. A lower-cost solution would be reducing the height of the trees but as others have pointed out, they look a bit rubbish when cut because they lose their conical shape.

    OP, I wouldn't worry about risks to your children from falling branches. Leylandii are tough b**gers and cope with pretty much any weather thrown at them. If the school thought there was even the remote risk of danger to their children, they would have done something themselves before now.

    An email to the school head introducing yourself as a new neighbour and asking if the school has any plans to maintain the trees in the future would get a conversation going. If the school has no plans, you could offer to fund reduction work or replacement if they would agree to it, budget permitting.
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 12:28 PM
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    steve1ae
    If this is affordable to the OP, then it's a good idea. A lower-cost solution would be reducing the height of the trees but as others have pointed out, they look a bit rubbish when cut because they lose their conical shape.

    OP, I wouldn't worry about risks to your children from falling branches. Leylandii are tough b**gers and cope with pretty much any weather thrown at them. If the school thought there was even the remote risk of danger to their children, they would have done something themselves before now.

    An email to the school head introducing yourself as a new neighbour and asking if the school has any plans to maintain the trees in the future would get a conversation going. If the school has no plans, you could offer to fund reduction work or replacement if they would agree to it, budget permitting.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    Thank-you. I think my worrying parental mind has been put firmly at ease now
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 10th Jul 17, 1:07 PM
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    Biggles
    Where have I said the greenhouse is shaded?
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    Er, in the original post, ie
    The problem is that they are very close to a greenhouse and do block out some sunlight.
    You then mention your children as a separate (but important) issue.

    But it isn't very helpful to anybody to completely reword the OP when you've had >20 replies to it, especially as the original wording is available where quoted by others.

    However, if your only fear is that the trees will fall on your children, you can rest easy. I border a lightly used public footpath and have just two large oaks; I have been told that if I don't get them checked regularly and a limb falls on someone, I am liable to be at least partly responsible. So you can imagine how careful the school, with dozens (hundreds?) of children there all day (maybe many with litigious parents?), is going to have to be. They will be having a tree surgeon check those at least every three years and there may even be a visual check every year. Those Leylandii are rock solid. Any sign of weakness, and they'll probably all come down.
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 2:17 PM
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    steve1ae
    Er, in the original post, ie You then mention your children as a separate (but important) issue.

    But it isn't very helpful to anybody to completely reword the OP when you've had >20 replies to it, especially as the original wording is available where quoted by others.

    However, if your only fear is that the trees will fall on your children, you can rest easy. I border a lightly used public footpath and have just two large oaks; I have been told that if I don't get them checked regularly and a limb falls on someone, I am liable to be at least partly responsible. So you can imagine how careful the school, with dozens (hundreds?) of children there all day (maybe many with litigious parents?), is going to have to be. They will be having a tree surgeon check those at least every three years and there may even be a visual check every year. Those Leylandii are rock solid. Any sign of weakness, and they'll probably all come down.
    Originally posted by Biggles

    You're right - I edited my original post when the thread starting to drift off topic. Children where the only real concern and perhaps I didn't get that point across in my original message. My fault.

    Thanks for your help
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 10th Jul 17, 2:47 PM
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    AndyMc.....
    You're right - I edited my original post when the thread starting to drift off topic. Children where the only real concern and perhaps I didn't get that point across in my original message. My fault.

    Thanks for your help
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    And what exactly is your concern?
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 3:05 PM
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    steve1ae
    And what exactly is your concern?
    Originally posted by AndyMc.....
    I'm obviously concerned that as the leylandii trees grow in size they will become a breeding ground for fairies. I can handle the pixies but the fairies have a poor dress sense and drink too much
    • Ozzuk
    • By Ozzuk 10th Jul 17, 4:23 PM
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    Ozzuk
    I think the best, amicable outcome will be that you request permission to have their trees reduced in height and access to do so, at your expense. This is a good time of year to do it if you manage to get in touch because presumably it would be tricky during term time. Schools have no money and the school has no obligation to maintain the trees' height at a certain point, unless they are unsafe, which they won't be at that height. You are allowed to trim back width to your boundary but to take off height requires their consent.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    I think autumn is generally the best time once the nesting period is out of the way.

    OP...talk to the school, you are being a bit precious but if they are that large I can see how impacting they would be. You are likely better off asking them to reduce the height, say in half, you'll still have privacy but a lot less perceived risk. Leylandi are one of the trees best designed to handle wind so very low risk of them coming down (but not impossible). The school may be more willing to reduce as it will be a lot less cost.

    I have the same at my house, several 30-40 foot trees, I considered talking to the neighbours and did read at the time if there are more than 3 trees then its considered a hedge so I could insist on it being reduced (if it was causing significant impact). But in the end I decided it was quite nice so said nothing - and they approached me a few weeks ago asking if I minded if they cut them down at the end of nesting season so all good.
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