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    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 9th Jul 17, 11:34 PM
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    steve1ae
    Advice on requesting tree removal
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 17, 11:34 PM
    Advice on requesting tree removal 9th Jul 17 at 11:34 PM
    Hi Everyone,

    We border a local school who have six leylandii trees hanging over our garden (approx 20-30 ft tall). I'm considering writing to the school to request they fell the tress. I'm not sure how best to approach it.

    I was wondering if anyone has been in a similar situation and managed to find an amicable solution?

    Many thanks for your help
    Last edited by steve1ae; 10-07-2017 at 11:41 AM. Reason: Making the post clearer
Page 1
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 9th Jul 17, 11:47 PM
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    Lorian
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 11:47 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 11:47 PM
    I'd go talk to the school secretary personally.
    • wealdroam
    • By wealdroam 10th Jul 17, 1:02 AM
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    wealdroam
    • #3
    • 10th Jul 17, 1:02 AM
    • #3
    • 10th Jul 17, 1:02 AM
    Hi Everyone,

    My wife and I have recently moved to our new home. We border a local school who have six leylandii trees hanging over our garden (approx 20-30 ft tall). The problem is that they are very close to a greenhouse and do block out some sunlight. More importantly, we have children who love to play in the garden.

    I'm considering writing to the school however, I'm really not sure on how I should approach it. I was wondering if anyone has been in a similar situation and managed to find an amicable solution?

    Many thanks for your help
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    How high were the trees when you moved in?
    Were they visible at that time?
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 10th Jul 17, 7:51 AM
    • 689 Posts
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    Ant555
    • #4
    • 10th Jul 17, 7:51 AM
    • #4
    • 10th Jul 17, 7:51 AM
    I have friends that were in a similar position - it seems that it was the school rather than the council that was responsible and thus it took a very long time (several years) as they had limited budget for non-emergency maintenance and even then it was only when a new fence was being put around the whole perminiter of the school so maybe it was hidden in someone elses budget.
    The downside is that my friends then had no privacy in their back garden from the school playground so have had to plant something themselves.

    More importantly, we have children who love to play in the garden.
    p
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    I wouldn't push this as one of your concerns as the treees are surely not preventing your children from playing in your garden -sunlight or shade.

    hope this helps.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 10th Jul 17, 7:54 AM
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #5
    • 10th Jul 17, 7:54 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Jul 17, 7:54 AM
    I think the best, amicable outcome will be that you request permission to have their trees reduced in height and access to do so, at your expense. This is a good time of year to do it if you manage to get in touch because presumably it would be tricky during term time. Schools have no money and the school has no obligation to maintain the trees' height at a certain point, unless they are unsafe, which they won't be at that height. You are allowed to trim back width to your boundary but to take off height requires their consent.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 10th Jul 17, 8:33 AM
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #6
    • 10th Jul 17, 8:33 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Jul 17, 8:33 AM
    I wouldn't push this as one of your concerns as the treees are surely not preventing your children from playing in your garden -sunlight or shade.
    Originally posted by Ant555
    Indeed. Surely shade is better for children than playing in the full glare of the sun?
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 10th Jul 17, 8:54 AM
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    Biggles
    • #7
    • 10th Jul 17, 8:54 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Jul 17, 8:54 AM
    I'm having difficulty seeing what the problem is.

    If you want your greenhouse to be in the full glare of sunlight, you could re-site it. Though it would mean lots more window-opening and watering. And, as has been said, the trees don't prevent your children playing, just like they presumably don't prevent the schoolchildren playing.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 10th Jul 17, 11:14 AM
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    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 10th Jul 17, 11:14 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Jul 17, 11:14 AM
    The problem is that they are very close to a greenhouse and do block out some sunlight. More importantly, we have children who love to play in the garden

    get rid of the green house if it is a safety hazard.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jul 17, 11:24 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 10th Jul 17, 11:24 AM
    • #9
    • 10th Jul 17, 11:24 AM
    Indeed. Surely shade is better for children than playing in the full glare of the sun?
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    Many schools have had to spend out on providing shade outdoors since a better awareness of skin cancer risks has become widespread.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:25 AM
    • 15 Posts
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    steve1ae
    Thanks for the replies everyone. Much appreciated.

    Sorry I should have explained better. i'm concerned about the trees falling on my children - not that they will suffer from a vitamin d deficiency I'm not a leylandii expert (or any tree expert) but presumably portions of the trees will fall eventually particularly with the severe winds that are a given on the west coast of Ireland
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 10th Jul 17, 11:30 AM
    • 28,205 Posts
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    Mojisola
    My wife and I have recently moved to our new home.
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    i'm concerned about the trees falling on my children

    presumably portions of the trees will fall eventually particularly with the severe winds that are a given on the west coast of Ireland
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    If you are so concerned, why on earth did you buy this house?

    At the very least, you could have talked to the school about the trees before agreeing to the sale.

    If the school refuses to do anything - even if you offer to pay - are you going to move again or keep your children indoors all the time?
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:30 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    steve1ae
    The problem is that they are very close to a greenhouse and do block out some sunlight. More importantly, we have children who love to play in the garden

    get rid of the green house if it is a safety hazard.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Are you suggesting I should go to the trouble and expense of moving a large greenhouse due to the school's inability to maintain their trees?
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 10th Jul 17, 11:33 AM
    • 28,205 Posts
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    Mojisola
    Are you suggesting I should go to the trouble and expense of moving a large greenhouse due to the school's inability to maintain their trees?
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    You knew the trees were there when you bought the house.

    You knew the greenhouse was shaded by the trees when you bought the house.
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:34 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    steve1ae
    If you are so concerned, why on earth did you buy this house?

    At the very least, you could have talked to the school about the trees before agreeing to the sale.

    If the school refuses to do anything - even if you offer to pay - are you going to move again or keep your children indoors all the time?
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    I came on here looking for advice on how best to approach requesting tree removal. Nothing else.
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:35 AM
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    steve1ae
    You knew the trees were there when you bought the house.

    You knew the greenhouse was shaded by the trees when you bought the house.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Where have I said the greenhouse is shaded?
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 10th Jul 17, 11:40 AM
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    Mojisola
    I think the best, amicable outcome will be that you request permission to have their trees reduced in height and access to do so, at your expense.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    I came on here looking for advice on how best to approach requesting tree removal. Nothing else.
    Originally posted by steve1ae
    AD gave you the advice you need.

    The forum is open to anyone to voice their opinion - you can't control replies.

    You may get a better response from the school if you start negotiations with a different attitude - starting out by telling them that their trees are going to hurt their children may push them into a harder position. They are likely to come back at you with the question of why you bought the house if you were concerned about the trees!
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:42 AM
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    steve1ae
    I've edited the post to keep it simple
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jul 17, 11:46 AM
    • 23,101 Posts
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    Davesnave
    I think the best, amicable outcome will be that you request permission to have their trees reduced in height and access to do so, at your expense. This is a good time of year to do it if you manage to get in touch because presumably it would be tricky during term time. Schools have no money and the school has no obligation to maintain the trees' height at a certain point, unless they are unsafe, which they won't be at that height. You are allowed to trim back width to your boundary but to take off height requires their consent.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck
    Schools do have money, including the school fund, typically boosted by parents via the PTA. Regardless of the actual 'pot,' the school will be liable for grounds maintenance

    Some of those parents will probably be close neighbours of the OP, and they wouldn't be too delighted to see 'their' money being spent on a project like tree reduction.

    For that reason, it would be politic to offer to fund the reduction and distinctly more likely that it would be allowed to take place.

    It's probably too late for this year, as such matters would need discussion with governors etc....and they're probably all on holiday prior to term ending and prices shooting-up!
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jul 17, 11:50 AM
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    Davesnave
    I see this has become a little contentious since I started my last post (electrician in the house and I'm assisting as & when) so I will just add that schools are normally very receptive to working with their immediate neighbours.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 10-07-2017 at 11:53 AM.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • steve1ae
    • By steve1ae 10th Jul 17, 11:52 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    steve1ae
    AD gave you the advice you need.

    The forum is open to anyone to voice their opinion - you can't control replies.

    You may get a better response from the school if you start negotiations with a different attitude - starting out by telling them that their trees are going to hurt their children may push them into a harder position. They are likely to come back at you with the question of why you bought the house if you were concerned about the trees!
    Originally posted by Mojisola

    Ad did give me great advice and I'm very grateful. Of course you're welcome to voice your opinion but you're offering suggestions to problems I haven't identified.

    That's the very reason why I started this thread - to get advice on how best to approach the school. Of course I'm not going to approach them with an attitude. I mentioned the children in an effort to provide some background as to why I was even considering approaching the school.
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