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  • FIRST POST
    • Ed_Zep
    • By Ed_Zep 9th Jul 17, 4:38 PM
    • 323Posts
    • 259Thanks
    Ed_Zep
    Hyundai i20 - Faulty ABS - Dealer Gripe
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 17, 4:38 PM
    Hyundai i20 - Faulty ABS - Dealer Gripe 9th Jul 17 at 4:38 PM
    The ABS is faulty so I took it to a dealer knowing full well the price to get it sorted would be a rip-off. £1729, in fact.

    It didn't bother me too much because you can usually get second-hand parts. However, after the woman showed me the details of the work I asked "Can I have the part number, please?" and she said "Sorry. it's not on the screen". I said "Yes it is, it's there" and she turned the screen back to her. Then she said "Sorry, we can't give out part numbers".

    They were supposed to wash and vacuum the car but didn't and left the fuse box cover on the seat. Well at least I know the fuse box is now.

    Appalling service, really.

    Later on I got a call from a half-asleep sounding mechanic saying they couldn't get a second-hand part and I explained there were loads of them on eBay and you can get ABS modules repaired for a fraction of the price.
Page 1
    • loskie
    • By loskie 9th Jul 17, 4:56 PM
    • 1,095 Posts
    • 661 Thanks
    loskie
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 4:56 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 4:56 PM
    You cannot realistically expect a main dealer to fit a used part. Go to a local independent back street garage for that.
    If you know that you can get the module repaired, remove it, send it away and when it comes back fixed re fit it.
    You will save yourself a packet.
    • Ed_Zep
    • By Ed_Zep 9th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    • 323 Posts
    • 259 Thanks
    Ed_Zep
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    You cannot realistically expect a main dealer to fit a used part. Go to a local independent back street garage for that.
    If you know that you can get the module repaired, remove it, send it away and when it comes back fixed re fit it.
    You will save yourself a packet.
    Originally posted by loskie
    I think you misread my post. The point was that they wouldn't give me the part number so I could get it installed by an independent, back street garage.
    I didn't expect or want them to do the work. Just to tell me what was wrong with the ABS.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jul 17, 7:02 PM
    • 15,054 Posts
    • 13,375 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 7:02 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 7:02 PM
    I think you misread my post. The point was that they wouldn't give me the part number so I could get it installed by an independent, back street garage.
    I didn't expect or want them to do the work. Just to tell me what was wrong with the ABS.
    Originally posted by Ed_Zep
    You say you knew the dealer would be a "rip-off" - so why take it there in the first place? Because they're the only one with the requisite diagnostic kit? Isn't that part of what you pay the dealer premium for?

    Why not just let the indie diagnose and source the parts? That why, your consumer protection is far stronger.

    Go to them, say "The problem is X, the part number is Y - please order and fit it", and you have no comeback if that does not resolve the issue.

    Go to them, say "My ABS is AWOL, please fix it", and you have protection.

    On many modern cars, used ECUs cannot be fitted, because they're coded to the car, and cannot be re-coded to a different car. That may or may not be the case for your Hyundai, but I suspect I'm not the only one here who does not know that for sure.
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 9th Jul 17, 7:16 PM
    • 11,523 Posts
    • 6,448 Thanks
    Strider590
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 7:16 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 7:16 PM
    Most garages, never mind dealers, would not fit used parts..... If it goes faulty they have absolutely no backup, but if a new warrantied part goes faulty they can claim their costs back.
    “I may not agree with you, but I will defend to the death your right to make an a** of yourself.”

    <><><><><><><><><<><><><><><><><><><><><><> Don't forget to like and subscribe \/ \/ \/
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 9th Jul 17, 8:28 PM
    • 1,063 Posts
    • 667 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:28 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:28 PM
    I didn't expect or want them to do the work. Just to tell me what was wrong with the ABS.
    I think they could reasonably charge for that ; and they might not know what the problem is, until they start changing parts.

    The common factor about things offered for sale, is that the seller wants money more than the thing ; which might mean the thing doesn't work.
    If you get a second-hard part, fitted by a back-street garage ; you then have 3 ways for it to o wrong : wrong diagnosis, bad part, bad process. Think of the dealer price as buying an insurance policy.

    http://www.snopes.com/business/genius/where.asp
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 9th Jul 17, 8:57 PM
    • 6,885 Posts
    • 3,127 Thanks
    buglawton
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:57 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:57 PM
    It's a bit worrying that a dealer replacement of a routine part can cost as much as the vehicle is worth though. Are there any brands left where franchised dealer repair costs don't make a 7+ year old car a financial write-off?
    • Iceweasel
    • By Iceweasel 9th Jul 17, 9:10 PM
    • 4,191 Posts
    • 3,034 Thanks
    Iceweasel
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:10 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:10 PM
    It's a bit worrying that a dealer replacement of a routine part can cost as much as the vehicle is worth though. Are there any brands left where franchised dealer repair costs don't make a 7+ year old car a financial write-off?
    Originally posted by buglawton
    Applied Economics Exam

    Question 1.

    The problem is that 2nd hand cars are too cheap.

    Depreciation is too high.

    Discuss.
    • Ed_Zep
    • By Ed_Zep 9th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • 323 Posts
    • 259 Thanks
    Ed_Zep
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    You say you knew the dealer would be a "rip-off" - so why take it there in the first place? Because they're the only one with the requisite diagnostic kit? Isn't that part of what you pay the dealer premium for?

    Why not just let the indie diagnose and source the parts? That why, your consumer protection is far stronger.

    Go to them, say "The problem is X, the part number is Y - please order and fit it", and you have no comeback if that does not resolve the issue.

    Go to them, say "My ABS is AWOL, please fix it", and you have protection.

    On many modern cars, used ECUs cannot be fitted, because they're coded to the car, and cannot be re-coded to a different car. That may or may not be the case for your Hyundai, but I suspect I'm not the only one here who does not know that for sure.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Yes, I needed the Hyundai diagnostics.
    Also, yes the pump and ECU module are combined. The dealer offered to code a used one. However, I've found places that repair them and returm them without a needing a code.

    £195 for the repair and then fitting on top.

    It's amazing what you can save when you shop around.
    Last edited by Ed_Zep; 09-07-2017 at 10:22 PM.
    • Ed_Zep
    • By Ed_Zep 9th Jul 17, 10:26 PM
    • 323 Posts
    • 259 Thanks
    Ed_Zep
    . Think of the dealer price as buying an insurance policy.
    Originally posted by Geoff1963
    £1729 is too high a premium.
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 10th Jul 17, 2:10 AM
    • 1,063 Posts
    • 667 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    My first car was £200 and 10 years old.
    My mother commented on its poor condition after only 10 years.
    I replied that if cars lasted better, my £200 would have bought me an equally poor condition 20 year old car.
    • Shaka_Zulu
    • By Shaka_Zulu 10th Jul 17, 6:44 AM
    • 950 Posts
    • 2,132 Thanks
    Shaka_Zulu
    Are there any brands left where franchised dealer repair costs don't make a 7+ year old car a financial write-off?
    Originally posted by buglawton

    Modern cars have a design life of 7 years to help drive the continuous conveyor belt for new cars.

    If you want to know which cars last and/or can be repaired cheaply you need to go to the poorer parts of the world this knowledge is almost instinctive.
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 10th Jul 17, 10:31 PM
    • 1,063 Posts
    • 667 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    Modern cars have a design life of 7 years
    . . . because most customers don't keep them very long, and the higher cost of making them more reliable, would put people off buying them. It naturally takes a long time to build a reputation for long-term reliability, but it is easily lost.

    As with computers, the specification and feature list of cars keeps increasing ; so older ones, even in showroom condition, would be very undesirable. The running costs ( fuel, tax, insurance ) are often very high compared to the value.
    • EdGasketTheSecond
    • By EdGasketTheSecond 11th Jul 17, 12:47 PM
    • 207 Posts
    • 106 Thanks
    EdGasketTheSecond
    [QUOTE=Shaka_Zulu;72815116]Modern cars have a design life of 7 years to help drive the continuous conveyor belt for new cars.
    /QUOTE]

    I disagree; nearly all my cars have lasted for at least 15 years. My current two cars are 17 and 18 years old. Rust is not nearly so much a problem now as it used to be. However expensive parts and stupidly complex electronic this, that, and the other can write a car off if they go wrong.
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 11th Jul 17, 10:12 PM
    • 6,885 Posts
    • 3,127 Thanks
    buglawton
    Modern cars have a design life of 7 years to help drive the continuous conveyor belt for new cars.

    If you want to know which cars last and/or can be repaired cheaply you need to go to the poorer parts of the world this knowledge is almost instinctive.
    Originally posted by Shaka_Zulu
    No need to exaggerate, I've owned cars up to 12/13 years old not a problem. I think that some brands/models will be more practical to keep going the longest. Question is which.

    Cuba and Egypt are 2 examples of countries where ingenuity and craftsmanship still exist to keep really old cars - 15+ years - going for everyday transport. Due to very high import cost of new vehicles vs low local labour cost.

    But that's not relevant to us busy - but still money saving - MSE followers.
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