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  • FIRST POST
    • gettingready
    • By gettingready 9th Jul 17, 8:19 AM
    • 10,859Posts
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    gettingready
    Fence - completely smooth on the outside to prevent ivy
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:19 AM
    Fence - completely smooth on the outside to prevent ivy 9th Jul 17 at 8:19 AM
    I have an ivy loving neighbour on one side of the garden and took me absolute ages to get rid of this horrid weed from my side of the fence only for the horrid thing to keep on growing back through the fence panels onto my side. And the marks on the fence from the ivy I pulled off are horrid looking.

    The fence belongs to my flat and he really should not be growing anything on it/directly against it but to argue that would be too much grief to be honest.

    He likes his ivy as according to him it is a lovely, low maintenance ever green. That means that I spend time each weekend pulling the dreaded new leaves etc from between the fence on my side while he enjoys his low maintenance weed.

    As I have better things to do with my weekends than fighting with his ivy - I am looking at options to simply replace the whole fence as it is my fence. But I want one that is completely smooth on the outside so his damn ivy with not catch onto it and climb up.

    Current wooden fence is in reasonable condition but there are gaps between the slats (not panels but individual slats) when ivy stems were thick and broken through.

    I tried to google smooth fence but they are all wooden and made from slats so same type as mine and will allow ivy to attach itself again.

    What I am really looking for are fence panels with the outside from one piece with no gap at all and from a material that will not allow ivy to attach itself to the fence again.

    Can anyone recommend something suitable at all? And where to get it from please?

    Thanks a lot
Page 1
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 9th Jul 17, 8:33 AM
    • 3,806 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:33 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:33 AM
    Ivy will cling to glass, so that won't work, I'm afraid. One easy solution would be to spray any ivy that comes through the fence. Might cause arguments, as his side will also suffer.

    But, smooth fence is a non starter.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 9th Jul 17, 8:41 AM
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    glasgowdan
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:41 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:41 AM
    A very open fence would be a better idea so you can easily wipe the leaves with a glyphosate-soaked sponge and there'll be less for the ivy to cling to and spread.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Jul 17, 7:09 PM
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    Davesnave
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 7:09 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 7:09 PM
    Make the panels removable and then remove them bi-monthly for 'maintenance.' Wave cheerily as you do this.

    The guy behind my old Dad's house used to do this to stop Dad growing roses against the fence. Used to drive Dad to distraction, but it worked.

    Dad was forced to erect his own trellis.....and quite right too!
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Linda32
    • By Linda32 9th Jul 17, 8:15 PM
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    Linda32
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:15 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:15 PM
    If you are looking to replace the whole fence. I'm not sure how it compares price wise but you can get plastic fences. I'm not sure whether ivy would stick to that. But if it won't stick then you have the benefit of less up keep than wood.
    • gettingready
    • By gettingready 9th Jul 17, 9:34 PM
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    gettingready
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:34 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:34 PM
    Make the panels removable and then remove them bi-monthly for 'maintenance.' Wave cheerily as you do this.

    The guy behind my old Dad's house used to do this to stop Dad growing roses against the fence. Used to drive Dad to distraction, but it worked.

    Dad was forced to erect his own trellis.....and quite right too!
    Originally posted by Davesnave

    Love it...
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Jul 17, 10:08 PM
    • 23,564 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:08 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:08 PM
    Love it...
    Originally posted by gettingready
    The guy actually moved his fence back around 50cm and concreted the gap that was left. This meant that he could swing the panels open somehow and walk along the concrete to 'inspect' his fence.

    Of course, it seemed as if he was in Dad's garden whever he did this, although he was really on his own land.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 9th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
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    PasturesNew
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:18 PM
    While annoying, there are more annoying things people could grow. Fences are very expensive items.... could you not just accept the ivy and let it grow ... no point wasting money on replacing fence that won't change a thing... go on holiday instead.
    • gettingready
    • By gettingready 9th Jul 17, 10:22 PM
    • 10,859 Posts
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    gettingready
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:22 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 10:22 PM
    Ivy is spreading onto my grass and killing it and any plants I want to put
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 10th Jul 17, 10:23 AM
    • 7,747 Posts
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    andrewf75
    I would just accept ivy. It generally looks good, is great for wildlife and probably strengthens the fence (no evidence for that just a hunch!)
    • gettingready
    • By gettingready 12th Jul 17, 10:06 PM
    • 10,859 Posts
    • 16,223 Thanks
    gettingready
    It does not strengthen the fence, it is breaking it as very thick bits pushed through the fence parts creating open gaps.

    It may look good if the "owner" keeps it under control and on his side. He should have never allowed it to get out of control and spread like this.

    I really have better things to do at weekends that to keep on pulling the dreaded ivy of MY fence.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 12th Jul 17, 11:20 PM
    • 1,311 Posts
    • 1,241 Thanks
    Grenage
    You're on a hiding to nothing, unfortunately.

    My neighbour has it running the full length between our gardens. I just trim it back twice a month.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 13th Jul 17, 7:58 AM
    • 3,806 Posts
    • 7,697 Thanks
    DaftyDuck
    As before, just spray your side of the fence with glyphosate. Job done in minutes, and permanently done as well.
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