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    • MrsKaykay
    • By MrsKaykay 9th Jul 17, 2:25 AM
    • 3Posts
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    MrsKaykay
    Wimpey No Fines- Buy or Not to buy?
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 17, 2:25 AM
    Wimpey No Fines- Buy or Not to buy? 9th Jul 17 at 2:25 AM
    Hello there,

    I have finally found a house after searching for so long! My offer was accepted and when the process had already started, I found out that it is a non standard construction (Wimpey NF). I was not told before (very annoyed at that) and if I had known I maybe wouldn't have put in an offer. The condition of the property is really good as the current owner has lived for many years and never had a problem with anything. But I think my concern is the saleability of the property in few years time. "Cash buyers only" scenario when I want to sell up is my biggest fear. My mortgage provider is happy to lend me on this property and I will get a full structural survey done too. Other houses on the same road and around are all similar build and they are selling at a good price.


    Does anyone have issues with this type of property?The internet is just too confusing and scary. Would I be taking a risk if I buy this property? Any advice is welcome.
    Thank you.
Page 1
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jul 17, 8:02 AM
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    AdrianC
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:02 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 17, 8:02 AM
    WNF is non-standard, yes, but it is NOT "defective". The definition of "defective" is specified by law, the Housing Defects Act 1984 - a third of a century old now.
    https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk/wiki/Housing_Defects_Act_1984

    There won't be changes to the list, unless something new comes to light about a particular construction type. WNF appears to be a fairly solid method - http://www.boltonsurveyors.org.uk/Wimpey.html - so you should be OK.

    Is it worth the same as a similar "standard" house? No. Are you paying the same now as if it was? Unlikely...
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Jul 17, 9:35 AM
    • 22,638 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:35 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:35 AM
    Would I be taking a risk if I buy this property?
    Originally posted by MrsKaykay
    Yes, you'll be taking a calculated risk, which is what most people do when they buy. There are simply too few houses where one is guaranteed that nothing will impact the resale value. It's the nature of things to change.

    People will look at no fines houses in a variety of ways, but many on this forum won't even have a clue what they are; they will simply be put off because they want the illusion of something safe and conventional.

    There's a village in this area where the views and general kudos that goes with living there keeps prices high. On the very edge of the village is a small estate of Wimpey no-fines properties with some of the best views. If I wanted to live in that village and most of the properties other than the dross were beyond my means, I'd buy one of those houses, because from my local knowledge, I'd say very few other kinds of blight, except prejudice, could affect them now.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jul 17, 9:37 AM
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    AdrianC
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:37 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 9:37 AM
    There are simply too few houses where one is guaranteed that nothing will impact the resale value. It's the nature of things to change.
    ...
    There's a village in this area where the views and general kudos that goes with living there keeps prices high. On the very edge of the village is a small estate of Wimpey no-fines properties with some of the best views. If I wanted to live in that village and most of the properties other than the dross were beyond my means, I'd buy one of those houses, because from my local knowledge, I'd say very few other kinds of blight, except prejudice, could affect them now.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Right up until the planning application for a big new development gets approved, and you lose that view.
    • stator
    • By stator 9th Jul 17, 6:06 PM
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    stator
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:06 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:06 PM
    There are hundreds of thousands of houses in the UK built of 'poured concrete' type. The construction is actually pretty standard, the solid walls, suspended 1st floor, timber roof with concrete tiles.

    The only thing to be wary of is looking for cracks. I had a surveyor who specialises in Wimpey no-fines and he said that if any cracks form around the corners of the windows then you will want to get it investigated or stay away. If cracks are left open, water can penetrate and cause rust to the small amount of steel reinforcement around the windows in the concrete. If maintained properly then it's not a problem, it's only a problem if it's neglected and left to let water in.
    So take a good lock at the front and back. If there are no cracks and the covering (pebbledash or render) is in good condition, then I would buy the house with no concerns.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • MrsKaykay
    • By MrsKaykay 9th Jul 17, 6:18 PM
    • 3 Posts
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    MrsKaykay
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:18 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:18 PM
    Is it worth the same as a similar "standard" house? No. Are you paying the same now as if it was? Unlikely...


    The current owner has extended the property to the side and back and kept the property tiptop. Couple of houses on the same road which needs refurbishment has sold for almost 8-9k more few months ago.
    • gld73
    • By gld73 9th Jul 17, 6:33 PM
    • 190 Posts
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    gld73
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:33 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:33 PM
    My current house is Wimpey No Fines, as are all the ones in this street and adjoining streets, and there are no problems buying or selling them. There might be some lenders who won't give a mortgage on them I suppose, but there are plenty that do. I don't know of any that have had structural problems.

    It's the first time I've owned an ex-council house ..... my previous homes, from when I was on a higher salary, were bigger houses and standard construction, but this one has the biggest bedrooms by far!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
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    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:36 PM
    Right up until the planning application for a big new development gets approved, and you lose that view.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Did I make my point it that badly?

    The Wimpey NF houses are the ones which are among the safest from development blight in that location, due to their elevation and the flood plain/estuary/protected bird areas below them.

    That's what I meant by "from my local knowledge......" etc

    Of course, in 100 years from now things might be different, or a bloody great tsunami might wipe the lot out next week, when some of the Azores goes south....

    However, many people would rather buy a less well-placed, conventional build in that village than 'risk' the no fines houses, because they fear non-conventional construction more than they worry about the type of development you mention.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jul 17, 6:38 PM
    • 14,710 Posts
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    AdrianC
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:38 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:38 PM
    Did I make my point it that badly?

    The Wimpey NF houses are the ones which are among the safest from development blight in that location, due to their elevation and the flood plain/estuary/protected bird areas below them.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Ah, you seem to have forgotten to mention that bit...

    But, as a more general case...
    • stator
    • By stator 10th Jul 17, 12:39 AM
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    stator
    Oh but one thing I forgot to mention, home insurance is a little trickier as not ALL insurers like wimpey no-fines or laing easi-form. Last time I checked Direct Line didn't like it.
    But there are plenty that do, most insurers consider concrete construction to be standards and so you won't end up paying more for your insurance, you just have to double check with the insurance company you chose.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • Piggywinkle
    • By Piggywinkle 11th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
    • 71 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    Piggywinkle
    There are a few other things to look out for too - a substantial amount of these houses were built using red ash flooring (Google is your friend!) so get that checked out as it will be another nail in the coffin of any mortgage offer if that were still in place.


    We looked at a Wimpey No-Fines recently but the detective work I did, the more problems appeared (not just the construction but other stuff too). Long shot, but it's not in the South Staffs area is it?
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 11th Jul 17, 9:54 AM
    • 1,265 Posts
    • 3,744 Thanks
    Penitent
    There are a few other things to look out for too - a substantial amount of these houses were built using red ash flooring (Google is your friend!) so get that checked out as it will be another nail in the coffin of any mortgage offer if that were still in place.

    We looked at a Wimpey No-Fines recently but the detective work I did, the more problems appeared (not just the construction but other stuff too). Long shot, but it's not in the South Staffs area is it?
    Originally posted by Piggywinkle
    Red ash/shale won't necessarily stop you getting a mortgage. My mum's mortgage provider was happy to go ahead as long as the floors were done following completion. She's also had no problems re-mortgaging or getting insurance.

    I've watched the other houses around us sell pretty quickly over the last few years--one went in a matter of days and it hadn't had the floors replaced--so it doesn't seem to be putting too many people off.

    The only problems we've had with the house are the concrete walls are hard on drill bits (so your kitchen fitter might use language) and the insulation is a bit pants (so it's hot in summer and cold in winter and you need to make sure it's well ventilated to stop condensation mould). A lot of people round here have had external insulation put on to counteract this.
    • Piggywinkle
    • By Piggywinkle 11th Jul 17, 10:02 AM
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    Piggywinkle
    The lenders we approached didn't like the prospect of red ash, so although it won't stop someone from getting a mortgage, it could potentially limit the mortgages provided, in the same way that a non-standard construction would, I suppose.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 11th Jul 17, 10:14 AM
    • 14,710 Posts
    • 13,078 Thanks
    AdrianC
    I've learnt something - I thought red ash was a type of wood...
    • stator
    • By stator 11th Jul 17, 2:11 PM
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    stator
    Red ash looks like a localised problem, near mining areas, the same as mundic is a problem in cornwall.
    The local surveyor who the bank hire to do a valuation survey would know if it needs to be checked
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 11th Jul 17, 2:47 PM
    • 1,265 Posts
    • 3,744 Thanks
    Penitent
    Red ash looks like a localised problem, near mining areas, the same as mundic is a problem in cornwall.
    The local surveyor who the bank hire to do a valuation survey would know if it needs to be checked
    Originally posted by stator
    I suspect there's some overlap between non-standard construction and red shale because opening/expanding a mine meant the Coal Board needed to shove up a load of housing ASAP to house all the folk they were shipping in to work there. I think that's what happened here, anyway.

    Like you say, I can't see it being an issue for the ones the Council put up in non-mining areas to rehouse folk that had been bombed. They'd probably use some local material rather than shipping in a load of crap left over from a mine.
    • MrsKaykay
    • By MrsKaykay 12th Jul 17, 11:38 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    MrsKaykay
    There are a few other things to look out for too - a substantial amount of these houses were built using red ash flooring (Google is your friend!) so get that checked out as it will be another nail in the coffin of any mortgage offer if that were still in place.


    We looked at a Wimpey No-Fines recently but the detective work I did, the more problems appeared (not just the construction but other stuff too). Long shot, but it's not in the South Staffs area is it?
    Originally posted by Piggywinkle

    What problems did you find with your detective work? The house we are looking is by Bracknell.
    • Piggywinkle
    • By Piggywinkle 15th Jul 17, 2:53 PM
    • 71 Posts
    • 24 Thanks
    Piggywinkle
    Ah, you're probably okay then! It was a particular area in South Staffs that had myriad problems when looked into. Bracknell is a long way from here
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