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  • FIRST POST
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 8th Jul 17, 11:43 PM
    • 178Posts
    • 121Thanks
    PhilE
    About to rent my property, barking dog issue.
    • #1
    • 8th Jul 17, 11:43 PM
    About to rent my property, barking dog issue. 8th Jul 17 at 11:43 PM
    So I've had a barking dog issue, the neighboring dogs bark incessantly from 8am to 11pm. Last night I went over and knocked on the door, the owner took offense to me pointing out it was 11pm and I couldn't sleep.

    I'm in a position where I could move quickly if I wanted to, and weighing up whether if I should fight this or simply move. If |I fight, I get the impression that its going to be a long one. But
    if I sell I have to declare the noisy dogs anyway, so then perhaps I might as well fight it.

    Having to declare a problem with neighbors that's resolved would probably not affect the price so much, whereas noisy dogs/an existing potential problem can potentially slash the cost of your property.

    I was going to rent for a year, but would want my tenants to be comfortable. A barking dog isn't my idea of comfort. So, if I rent I'd also have to take action against the dog owners now. And then I have to wait for it to be rectified before renting, and I don't know how long that would take.

    So a selfish dog owner has potentially affected my chances of renting in the near future, which could cost me hundreds of pounds. As well as the stress of not being able to enjoy my home as I would like.

    I was going to put a formal letter through the door tonight, but am pausing to think first. I wouldn't want tenants or future buyers to go through what I'm going through, so I should take action. However, once it gets formal, your property loses value.

    The fact that one careless dog owner can cause you such misery and potential financial loss is a terrible
    thing.

    Any thoughts and advice appreciated.
Page 1
    • beedeedee
    • By beedeedee 8th Jul 17, 11:52 PM
    • 915 Posts
    • 1,210 Thanks
    beedeedee
    • #2
    • 8th Jul 17, 11:52 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Jul 17, 11:52 PM
    The dogs may not bother any future tenants....a lot of people are happy to know they are around to give warning of intruders etc and maybe the tenants will be at work most of the time.
    Why not rent it out and see how it goes? Obviously if it becomes a problem, then take action, but I'd give it a whirl first.......
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Jul 17, 12:07 AM
    • 178 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    PhilE
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:07 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:07 AM
    The dogs may not bother any future tenants....a lot of people are happy to know they are around to give warning of intruders etc and maybe the tenants will be at work most of the time.
    Why not rent it out and see how it goes? Obviously if it becomes a problem, then take action, but I'd give it a whirl first.......
    Originally posted by beedeedee
    There's a dog on the street that actually only barks if there's an intruder, which makes for a practcal dog.

    These dogs just bark for no apparent reason, so no one would pay attention to them barking at an intruder, as they always bark anyway.

    Any potential tenant is going to ask, 'Is the neighborhood quiet?' Right now it would be my legal duty to say no the area is not quiet, there's a couple of dogs constantly barking. Its pretty obvious anyway, the streets so quiet it makes the dogs seem even louder.

    As a seller you can get sued for not disclosing that, and I imagine as a landlord that's also the case.
    • kelpie35
    • By kelpie35 9th Jul 17, 12:18 AM
    • 1,522 Posts
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    kelpie35
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:18 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:18 AM
    Is the barking dogs causing your neighbors a problem or is it just you that has a problem with them?
    • glosoli
    • By glosoli 9th Jul 17, 12:19 AM
    • 673 Posts
    • 387 Thanks
    glosoli
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:19 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:19 AM
    Haven't got anything to add but I feel your pain. If our neighbours aren't fighting or partying, there is always the dog to fill the noise void...
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Jul 17, 12:28 AM
    • 178 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    PhilE
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:28 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 17, 12:28 AM
    Haven't got anything to add but I feel your pain. If our neighbours aren't fighting or partying, there is always the dog to fill the noise void...
    Originally posted by glosoli
    That would be too much for me, I'd definitely move! I hope you manage to do that.
    • aneary
    • By aneary 9th Jul 17, 1:28 AM
    • 751 Posts
    • 632 Thanks
    aneary
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 1:28 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 17, 1:28 AM
    Dogs generally don't bark all the time unless there is a reason generally mistreatment have you thought about calling the RSPCA.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 9th Jul 17, 1:56 AM
    • 720 Posts
    • 256 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 1:56 AM
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 17, 1:56 AM
    Dogs generally don't bark all the time unless there is a reason generally mistreatment have you thought about calling the RSPCA.
    Originally posted by aneary
    Is the dog inside or outside; if its outside you could give it a bone, to keep it quiet for a few minutes.
    Try to solve the issue yourself? Calling the RSPCA is good.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 9th Jul 17, 6:45 AM
    • 13,979 Posts
    • 37,966 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:45 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 17, 6:45 AM
    The dogs may not bother any future tenants....a lot of people are happy to know they are around to give warning of intruders etc and maybe the tenants will be at work most of the time.
    Why not rent it out and see how it goes? Obviously if it becomes a problem, then take action, but I'd give it a whirl first.......
    Originally posted by beedeedee
    You could find the tenant took the same view as most people would though and promptly decided "Thanks very much - not - landlord and here's my notice".

    That's what I would do if I found I was exposed to a dog barking like that after I moved in.

    My sympathies OP and hope you manage to resolve it. I get annoyed enough that I've got a similar "antisocial" near me and their dog just barks intermittently and has continued to be allowed to do so (despite my pointing out to them that quite a few houses nearby can hear this besides myself). So very frustrating - even if the barking is infrequent enough that I just resort to saying "Chav" or the like rather loudly in my garden when they let it start up again.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 09-07-2017 at 6:50 AM.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 9th Jul 17, 9:36 AM
    • 3,244 Posts
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    bouicca21
    Your mum has a problem with neighbours. You have a problem with neighbours. Makes one wonder just who is really the problem.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Jul 17, 9:53 AM
    • 23,574 Posts
    • 89,434 Thanks
    Davesnave
    So I've had a barking dog issue, the neighboring dogs bark incessantly from 8am to 11pm.
    Originally posted by PhilE
    Your mum has a problem with neighbours. You have a problem with neighbours. Makes one wonder just who is really the problem.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    That's a little harsh. If the OP is telling the truth in the above sentence, he has reason to complain. Are you saying that's an exaggeration, a lie, or what?

    Dogs generally don't bark all the time unless there is a reason generally mistreatment have you thought about calling the RSPCA.
    Originally posted by aneary
    Dogs bark because they are left alone with nothing to do, and some breeds bark much more than others. The RSPCA are powerless to intervene just because a dog is bored. Provided it has food, water and basic shelter, there's damn-all they can do.

    We've had several barking dog threads, most of which have convinced me that many contributors have little first hand experience, and thus too little empathy about the distress caused by an 'incessantly' barking dog. Like a baby crying, it's a sound that has evolved so that it's much harder to ignore than, say, traffic.

    And as with all the other barking dog threads, the advice is the same: get as many neighbours as you can on-side, then contact environmental health at the council. You will have to keep records and they may need to install monitoring equipment, but if it's as bad as you say, a resolution will probably be reached. It just won't happen quickly.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 9th Jul 17, 10:04 AM
    • 1,686 Posts
    • 3,477 Thanks
    IAmWales
    As an interim solution to let you get some rest, I can recommend a white noise machine. This one works for me.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 9th Jul 17, 10:16 AM
    • 13,979 Posts
    • 37,966 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I also think that comment re mother was totally unwarranted and more than a little harsh.

    The only possible connection is that (adult) children often have some of the same values as their parent. Thus - my mother expects her home to be quiet, well-maintained, not to be a nuisance herself to neighbours and I've grown up with that and expect exactly the same = quiet, maintain my home well and expect neighbours to do the same, not a bother to neighbours and expect them not to be a bother to me. The only difference is she puts up with any bad neighbours (or swops house! - which she's done before) and I deal with bad neighbours.

    Nothing wrong with the same values - as long as they are reasonable values - as these obviously are.

    OP's neighbour, on the other hand, has quite possibly been brought up by someone who thinks its okay to be noisy/probably neglects their house/etc/etc.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Jul 17, 10:25 AM
    • 178 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    PhilE
    Your mum has a problem with neighbours. You have a problem with neighbours. Makes one wonder just who is really the problem.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    Sounds like you have a problem.
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Jul 17, 10:34 AM
    • 178 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    PhilE
    You could find the tenant took the same view as most people would though and promptly decided "Thanks very much - not - landlord and here's my notice".


    My sympathies OP and hope you manage to resolve it. I get annoyed enough that I've got a similar "antisocial" near me and their dog just barks intermittently and has continued to be allowed to do so (despite my pointing out to them that quite a few houses nearby can hear this besides myself). So very frustrating - even if the barking is infrequent enough that I just resort to saying "Chav" or the like rather loudly in my garden when they let it start up again.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Thats what I would do also. Living next to a barking dog is misery.

    As posters have suggested here, yes I could go the council route and there's a possibility it'll get solved. However, as soon as you start complaining to the council, there's a possibility the value of your property could take a nose dive.

    Which is probably why a good many people don't make complaints.

    I'll definitely do an informal letter, which is something I wouldn't have to declare should I sell. However, I'd still have to declare the barking dog.

    I find it injust that not only can a barking dog make your life miserable, it can cause you a loss of thousands of pounds if you take action against it.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 9th Jul 17, 10:49 AM
    • 3,875 Posts
    • 2,883 Thanks
    sheramber
    Is the dog a new arrival and therefore all noises are new to it and it is barking.

    If it was there when you bought the house how did you not hear it barking all day and evening. It as bound to be barking when you viewed the house.
    • ripplyuk
    • By ripplyuk 9th Jul 17, 11:13 AM
    • 1,659 Posts
    • 1,562 Thanks
    ripplyuk
    If you are able to reduce the rent compared to other houses in the area, I don't think you'll have problems getting a tenant. A lot of people are desperate for affordable rentals. If the price is right, they may well put up with this barking dog issue. You can still go through the complaint process with environmental health on their behalf.

    I think anyone who judges you about this hasn't had to put up with barking dogs for long. My neighbours have a dog, a big giant breed who shouts out a few deep woofs whenever someone approaches the house. That's what I would call 'normal' dog noise, and I appreciate his warning. Very different from incessant shrill barking for hours on end. That's simply intolerable.

    It makes me think of that movie 'Keeping Mum'. Obviously I in no way condone what happened there, and it is meant as a joke in the movie, but I can't help having a certain amount of understanding over it. This really can drive people crazy after a while, especially if the authorities aren't much help.
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Jul 17, 12:55 PM
    • 178 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    PhilE
    I also think that comment re mother was totally unwarranted and more than a little harsh.

    The only possible connection is that (adult) children often have some of the same values as their parent. Thus - my mother expects her home to be quiet, well-maintained, not to be a nuisance herself to neighbours and I've grown up with that and expect exactly the same = quiet, maintain my home well and expect neighbours to do the same, not a bother to neighbours and expect them not to be a bother to me. The only difference is she puts up with any bad neighbours (or swops house! - which she's done before) and I deal with bad neighbours.

    Nothing wrong with the same values - as long as they are reasonable values - as these obviously are.

    OP's neighbour, on the other hand, has quite possibly been brought up by someone who thinks its okay to be noisy/probably neglects their house/etc/etc.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Yes, I was also brought up to be respectable to the neighbors and keep my home in good repair. It's common sense really.

    Some neighbors think thats its ok to be inconsiderate and rude to others. There are laws for this, but its sometimes hard to implement and should you wish to sell at a later date, as I do, you have to declare the problems.

    Saying that, I've seen houses that have been burgled during the buying process still sell. I remember one house I went to view, it a dog next door the size of a small horse that barked as soon as you went into the garden. It was the sort of deep bass bark that reverberated through walls. I thanked the agent and left, he completely understood. The house was under offer a week later and sold for its asking price, which was market value.
    So some people are not bothered by dogs barking.

    The other neighbors haven't voiced any complaints to me, nor I to them. I've met most of the neighbors, they seem fine. There's no loud music, parties or anything. Just this one dog.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Jul 17, 1:57 PM
    • 23,574 Posts
    • 89,434 Thanks
    Davesnave

    As posters have suggested here, yes I could go the council route and there's a possibility it'll get solved. However, as soon as you start complaining to the council, there's a possibility the value of your property could take a nose dive.

    I'll definitely do an informal letter, .
    Originally posted by PhilE
    I have doubts that a letter to the owner will make much difference. Why should it? The owner either doesn't care about the nuisance they're responsible for, or they're weak willed, unintelligent and not able to change the situation without a strong incentive, like the possibility of prosecution.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Jul 17, 2:17 PM
    • 178 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    PhilE
    I have doubts that a letter to the owner will make much difference. Why should it? The owner either doesn't care about the nuisance they're responsible for, or they're weak willed, unintelligent and not able to change the situation without a strong incentive, like the possibility of prosecution.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    If they cared for their neighbors, they wouldn't have allowed the barking in the first place. There's 2 other houses on the street with dogs. One is to the other side of me. I'll hear the dog barking once every couple of days for a few minutes. and thats it.
    The other 'dog house,' is a couple of doors down and I've never once heard their dogs.

    I knocked at 11.20pm the other night and pointed out her dog was keeping me awake. Her response was 'Ok then.'


    With what I've been going through with both my mums property and my own, I'm at the end of my tether. If I am going to inform the council, it would be good to see that they have some sort of proof that I have attempted to be a kind and reasonable neighbor, hence a polite but to the point letter.

    Could anyone comment on the effect on property value of a barking dog, or having had to go to the council to complain of one?
    Last edited by PhilE; 09-07-2017 at 2:21 PM.
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