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  • FIRST POST
    • Kimpop
    • By Kimpop 7th Jul 17, 5:43 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Kimpop
    Shared lane
    • #1
    • 7th Jul 17, 5:43 PM
    Shared lane 7th Jul 17 at 5:43 PM
    Hi everyone, We are currently searching for a new home. We want to move into the country and have found a beautiful home, in beautiful surroundings with a beautiful view. It's in the exact location that we would love to live. The only thing that's slightly putting us off is the shared lane. It's shared with other houses and a farm so there is cars and tractors going up and down the lane, that's not the problem though. The problem is the lane itself. It's a bone rattler, it's one of the worst lanes I've been on. I'm worried about repairing and maintaining the lane and the costs involved. Would we even be allowed to do anything with the lane? From the house to the roadside it would be at least 100feet long so we couldn't afford a full fix even if we were allowed to do anything.
    I'm just wondering if anyone has had an experience of buying a home on a shared lane and what have you done with maintainence etc? Thanks for reading and any advice would be gratefully received
Page 1
    • G_M
    • By G_M 7th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    • 41,883 Posts
    • 48,466 Thanks
    G_M
    • #2
    • 7th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    It all depends

    * who owns the lane
    * who is responsible for arranging its maintenance
    * who is responsible for paying for its maintenance
    * whether you'd consider switching to a nice Land Rover Defender
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Jul 17, 7:00 PM
    • 13,904 Posts
    • 37,825 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #3
    • 7th Jul 17, 7:00 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Jul 17, 7:00 PM
    You need to establish:

    - what proportion of road maintenance costs would be paid by each house

    - what arrangements there are about how the households make their decision together about whether any work needs doing/who will arrange it if so/etc. There may not be any.

    - see if there is any work at all currently in mind to be done to that road

    - establish whether there is a known owner to the road or no and, if so, who it is. If there is a known owner - do they expect to just tell other households what to do or will it be communal decision-making
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 07-07-2017 at 7:06 PM.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 7th Jul 17, 7:12 PM
    • 15,430 Posts
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    AdrianC
    • #4
    • 7th Jul 17, 7:12 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jul 17, 7:12 PM
    You want to move to the country, but are worried about a lane that's not smooth...?

    Let's have a look at a pic of it, then, see exactly how bad it is.
    • smallholdingsister
    • By smallholdingsister 7th Jul 17, 9:11 PM
    • 3,532 Posts
    • 27,424 Thanks
    smallholdingsister
    • #5
    • 7th Jul 17, 9:11 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jul 17, 9:11 PM
    It is a problem. Who owns it?
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 7th Jul 17, 10:58 PM
    • 15,430 Posts
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    AdrianC
    • #6
    • 7th Jul 17, 10:58 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jul 17, 10:58 PM
    It is a problem. Who owns it?
    Originally posted by smallholdingsister
    Who knows?
    Does it matter?

    Many of these shared access lanes - including the one heading to three houses and our back gate - have unknown ownership. The residents who share it simply maintain it between them.

    That maintenance is rarely onerous - just chuck a bag of gravel into the bigger holes every now and then.
    Last edited by AdrianC; 08-07-2017 at 9:23 AM. Reason: Smelling pistake
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 7th Jul 17, 11:27 PM
    • 2,577 Posts
    • 2,891 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    • #7
    • 7th Jul 17, 11:27 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jul 17, 11:27 PM
    I don't imagine shared maintenance of a lane would become a major issue in your life. Perhaps you're overthinking it. Ignore that and make an offer.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 7th Jul 17, 11:56 PM
    • 5,321 Posts
    • 4,675 Thanks
    00ec25
    • #8
    • 7th Jul 17, 11:56 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jul 17, 11:56 PM
    as GM says, you may, or may not be purchasing a share of the ownership and/or maintenance liability for the lane

    until you establish the actual position, stories of other people's experience won't help you.

    We had a lane near here where it was deliberately left unmade to discourage use, much to the disgust of the only "incomer" living on it. Took 35 years for enough people to die, and attitudes thus change, before it was finally made up "properly" as the incomer could not pay for all the work alone and the "originals" refused.
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 7th Jul 17, 11:59 PM
    • 307 Posts
    • 200 Thanks
    rjwr
    • #9
    • 7th Jul 17, 11:59 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jul 17, 11:59 PM
    i have a shared lane with three others, the only ownership we could find is of a dead family.

    no one else has responsibility. consequently you would think it would be in rag order, but nope its tickity boo.

    go ahead, dont let this put you off
    But never spend money you don't have to buy things you don't want to impress people you don't like.
    .
    Originally posted by kidmugsy
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 8th Jul 17, 1:22 AM
    • 2,838 Posts
    • 5,077 Thanks
    EachPenny
    I'm just wondering if anyone has had an experience of buying a home on a shared lane and what have you done with maintainence etc? Thanks for reading and any advice would be gratefully received
    Originally posted by Kimpop
    You should have specified that you needed advice from people living in a home on a shared lane used by agricultural vehicles (probably HGV's too). These have an altogether different impact on the life expectancy of any road than the occasional passage of private cars. A modern tractor can easily 'eat' a bag of gravel in a single pass

    You should find out about the ownership and maintenance arrangements for the lane and then decide whether it is worth it to live in this house you like
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 8th Jul 17, 6:17 AM
    • 13,904 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    It would be useful in that case to know exactly what the road surface of this particular road is - ie standard tarmac done to a decent standard, tarmac done to a "lesser road" standard, gravel, etc.

    ? Possibly helpful to know just how much use is made of it by tractors and HGV's? Now I've moved to a semi-rural area I can appreciate there are tractors and tractors. I was still picturing something pretty small/human-size and I expect you are picturing something not much bigger than a car? Well - they're still around - but I've realised there are also massive great tractors these days that tower over people in size and they must "weigh a ton". You don't look at them - you look up at them.

    Re ownership - it's probably better if there isn't a known owner. Then everyone will be acting together co-operatively. If there is a known owner then they may be trying to tell the others what to do and refusing to act co-operatively.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 08-07-2017 at 6:24 AM.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 8th Jul 17, 7:05 AM
    • 23,526 Posts
    • 89,339 Thanks
    Davesnave
    If there's nothing on paper, then the surface arrived-at will depend on random factors, like who lives at the far end and what their attitude is towards ease of access.

    Even where there is a defined maintenance contribution, my experience is that there's always someone for whom money is tight!

    In any event, the surface you see is likely to be the one you'll get. Either decide now to buy a 4x4, or move on. This is the price one often pays for not being on a road with passing traffic.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 8th Jul 17, 7:09 AM
    • 23,526 Posts
    • 89,339 Thanks
    Davesnave
    It all depends

    * who owns the lane
    * who is responsible for arranging its maintenance
    * who is responsible for paying for its maintenance
    * whether you'd consider switching to a nice Land Rover Defender
    Originally posted by G_M
    Have you ever driven a Defender?

    I have!

    Wouldn't want it if I could get away with one of the modern Japanese / Korean etc double cabs.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 8th Jul 17, 8:14 AM
    • 15,430 Posts
    • 13,761 Thanks
    AdrianC
    You should have specified that you needed advice from people living in a home on a shared lane used by agricultural vehicles (probably HGV's too). These have an altogether different impact on the life expectancy of any road than the occasional passage of private cars. A modern tractor can easily 'eat' a bag of gravel in a single pass
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    The lane I referred to is used by large tractors, as well as larger trucks. Anywhere in the country will be used by trucks on a semi-regular basis, dealing with things townies take for granted - like delivering oil and gas for heating, or taking away the contents of septic tanks. Largest I've seen down there are 18t rigid trucks and JCB Fastracs. There's an axle weight limit on all trucks, so once you get much beyond 7.5t, the loadings are the same.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 8th Jul 17, 9:18 AM
    • 13,904 Posts
    • 37,825 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    The lane I referred to is used by large tractors, as well as larger trucks. Anywhere in the country will be used by trucks on a semi-regular basis, dealing with things townies take for granted - like delivering oil and gas for heating, or taking away the contents of septic tanks. Largest I've seen down there are 18t rigid trucks and JCB Fastracs. There's an axle weight limit on all trucks, so once you get much beyond 7.5t, the loadings are the same.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Very true.

    As a city person - all that sort of thing hadnt crossed my mind.

    Large everyday type deliveries (ie of goods) as well get made to even ordinary homes on blinkin' great lorries sometimes. You don't think of these things either when all you're used to anyone having anywhere is standard normal roads and huge lorries probably don't turn up with anything in the first place very much - and, if they do, then they're driving along and then parking on these "standard normal roads".

    The only time I can ever recall spotting an enormous great lorry in my previous (city) road was a removal van whenever someone was moving. Country living is a revelation....

    My eyes must have been visibly popping out of my head for months to start with at the sheer size of some of the vehicles round here - tractors and enormous lorries...
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 08-07-2017 at 9:25 AM.
    #MeToo

    Why should our needs override the needs of all other living species? What makes us so special? (Brigit Strawbridge)
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 8th Jul 17, 11:04 AM
    • 60,665 Posts
    • 354,664 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    Who clears the lane when you're cut off in the winter?
    It might be nobody .... can you shovel 100 foot long of 6" deep snow to get to work?

    It might be that most of the time the farmer's out early doing it .... but one day he might stop needing to get up/out/down that lane that early ever again.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 8th Jul 17, 11:10 AM
    • 15,430 Posts
    • 13,761 Thanks
    AdrianC
    Who clears the lane when you're cut off in the winter?
    It might be nobody .... can you shovel 100 foot long of 6" deep snow to get to work?
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    Meanwhile, here in the UK...
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 8th Jul 17, 11:22 AM
    • 60,665 Posts
    • 354,664 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    Meanwhile, here in the UK...
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    6 inches isn't difficult to accumulate, especially if there's a wind and the snow's drifting.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 8th Jul 17, 11:24 AM
    • 15,430 Posts
    • 13,761 Thanks
    AdrianC
    Yes, you might get a 6" drift against a wall - perhaps even more. But not across the full width of a lane...

    And, if you did, you might as well not even bother trying to get to work, because you can bet it's going to be utter chaos once you get onto the roads itself...
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 8th Jul 17, 12:04 PM
    • 6,304 Posts
    • 5,072 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    OP. Talk to the neighbours about the lane. There may be no regular or ongoing problems other than being bumpy.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
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