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  • FIRST POST
    • sauceoclock
    • By sauceoclock 6th Jul 17, 4:24 PM
    • 741Posts
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    sauceoclock
    What would you need to know as a LL if a tenant wanted an OH to move in?
    • #1
    • 6th Jul 17, 4:24 PM
    What would you need to know as a LL if a tenant wanted an OH to move in? 6th Jul 17 at 4:24 PM
    I intend to ask my landlady if she is agreeable to my boyfriend moving in at the end of September (he has been offered work back at home and we’d like to end our long-distance). I’ve only been a tenant in her property for 4 months, I’m a vetted and referenced tenant and my landlady manages the property directly only using an agency to procure tenants in the event of eviction or vacation of the property. My landlady hasn’t inspected since I moved in but has dropped in for different bits and bobs and seems happy with me as a tenant, we text back and forth if there are any issues and they’re always pleasant. My boyfriend recently fixed a sink (he’s a tradesman) that she was going to send a plumber for and she was very thankful. As far as I have checked there are no clauses in my AST that state I must be the sole occupant and previously a couple did live in the house (appreciate her insurance may state differently). If she declines my request then I will see the end of my tenancy out living alone with him staying as a guest on weekends and he’d have to rent somewhere else. We’d then look to move next April but that is really my last wish, I love the house and my neighbours, it’s perfectly located on a street with my closest friends a few doors away and the city centre a short walk.

    As there are a plethora of landlords/ladys here on the forum I am wondering what you would care to know if one of your tenants asked for a boyfriend/girlfriend to move in. I respect her rights as the owner of the property and want to cover all my bases concisely in my e-mail asking her permission. I have already covered that he has no criminal convictions, will be employed full-time, that we are happy to put in writing that upon separation I would remain the sole tenant and he would move elsewhere, that he has an exemplary credit record and that we are happy to forward relevant rental and employment references. Thank you in advance for letting me borrow your knowledge and hopefully giving a LL’s point of view.
    Christmas Shopping: £30 Amazon £30 Argos £10 Tesco
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Page 2
    • abuttyout
    • By abuttyout 7th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
    • 11 Posts
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    abuttyout
    You can have whoever you want round whenever you want.

    Its got nothing to do with the LL end of.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 7th Jul 17, 4:15 PM
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    FBaby
    I would email her and give all the info you gave here and ask permission for OH to reside at the property
    She doesn't have to ask for permission, but informing her LL will help with good the good relationship already established.
    • EmmyLou30
    • By EmmyLou30 7th Jul 17, 4:34 PM
    • 298 Posts
    • 340 Thanks
    EmmyLou30
    I would also say out of courtesy to maintain the good relationship you have with your LL to let her know. I would say moving in is hardly a 'guest' as everyone else is saying! Legally she can do nothing but kick you out at the end of the tenancy but why go through all that if you may want to stay on. I imagine most LL's would want to know who was in the house from an insurance point of view (criminal convictions etc may influence a policy? although not in this case, I'm just stating why they'd want to know), and also if the new tenancy could have 2 names on then 2 people to chase in the case of unpaid rent.
    But just to keep the good relationship it'd be polite to tell her. Not all landlords are !!!!!holes who deserve to be treated with contempt because 'legally' you don't need to tel them etc etc. You get my point :-)
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 7th Jul 17, 4:41 PM
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    Guest101
    I would also say out of courtesy to maintain the good relationship you have with your LL to let her know. I would say moving in is hardly a 'guest' - that's nice, but legally it is as everyone else is saying! Legally she can do nothing but kick you out at the end of the tenancy but why go through all that if you may want to stay on - because she already said if the LL wasn't happy theyd move out after the fixed term . I imagine most LL's would want to know who was in the house from an insurance point of view - since LLs don't carry out DBS checks on tenants how is that relevant? (criminal convictions etc may influence a policy? although not in this case, I'm just stating why they'd want to know), and also if the new tenancy could have 2 names on then 2 people to chase in the case of unpaid rent. - That's up to the tenant, not the LL
    But just to keep the good relationship it'd be polite to tell her. Not all landlords are !!!!!holes who deserve to be treated with contempt because 'legally' you don't need to tel them etc etc. You get my point :-)
    Originally posted by EmmyLou30
    How is this treating them like ****holes? Just curious?


    OIs the OP supposed to inform the LL everytime someone walks through the front door?
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 7th Jul 17, 5:14 PM
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    Pixie5740
    If I had the right of prima nocta....
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 7th Jul 17, 6:00 PM
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    • 39,225 Thanks
    FBaby
    OIs the OP supposed to inform the LL everytime someone walks through the front door?
    Is this really comparable to someone making the property their home, moving their belongings.

    Why such an attitude about informing the LL of some important information? In the end, either their response will be along the line of 'thank you very much for informing me, hope he enjoys the property' or they won't be happy about it at all and will take the same actions they would when they finally find out about it.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 7th Jul 17, 6:14 PM
    • 35,534 Posts
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    silvercar
    A guest is a bit different to someone declaring that the property is their main residence.

    There may be conditions in the lease that prevent others moving in on a permanent basis eg number in occupancy restrictions.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 7th Jul 17, 7:03 PM
    • 14,479 Posts
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    Guest101
    Is this really comparable to someone making the property their home, moving their belongings.

    Why such an attitude about informing the LL of some important information? In the end, either their response will be along the line of 'thank you very much for informing me, hope he enjoys the property' or they won't be happy about it at all and will take the same actions they would when they finally find out about it.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    Well their status is the same.

    The attitude is because the LL is not the tenants mum or dad. It's nothing to do with them
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 7th Jul 17, 7:14 PM
    • 29,067 Posts
    • 54,114 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    In my own particular case, knowing my tenant's background I would want to know who was moving in (he is an excellent tenant but has had problems in the past which we know about).

    In general, I think that if they are not going on the tenancy, then there is no need to ask permission, although it might be polite to do so.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    St. Augustine — 'In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.'
    • paddypaws101
    • By paddypaws101 7th Jul 17, 10:43 PM
    • 2,045 Posts
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    paddypaws101
    What do you mean permission? She doesn't need permission.
    Originally posted by Guest101
    My tenancy agreements include a clause which state that only the named tenants can reside at the property and I don't think that is an unusual clause.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 7th Jul 17, 10:55 PM
    • 14,710 Posts
    • 13,078 Thanks
    AdrianC
    My tenancy agreements include a clause which state that only the named tenants can reside at the property and I don't think that is an unusual clause.
    Originally posted by paddypaws101
    I'm sure it isn't unusual. A more relevant question is whether it's enforceable.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 8th Jul 17, 6:28 AM
    • 15,652 Posts
    • 39,225 Thanks
    FBaby
    The attitude is because the LL is not the tenants mum or dad. It's nothing to do with them
    Yeah, but every time a tenant wants something here that the LL doesn't have to give, we always suggest the 'tea and cake' approach, so returning the suggestion here.

    What does OP got to lose telling her LL? She does have something to gain by being considerate though by providing them with relevant information.
    • paddypaws101
    • By paddypaws101 10th Jul 17, 3:57 PM
    • 2,045 Posts
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    paddypaws101
    I'm sure it isn't unusual. A more relevant question is whether it's enforceable.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Maybe not through a Section 8 but certainly enough of a breach of contract to push many landlords into serving section 21.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 10th Jul 17, 4:02 PM
    • 14,479 Posts
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    Guest101
    My tenancy agreements include a clause which state that only the named tenants can reside at the property and I don't think that is an unusual clause.
    Originally posted by paddypaws101
    Nor is it an enforceable clause.....
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 10th Jul 17, 4:03 PM
    • 14,479 Posts
    • 14,182 Thanks
    Guest101
    Maybe not through a Section 8 but certainly enough of a breach of contract to push many landlords into serving section 21.
    Originally posted by paddypaws101
    In which case where's the upside of telling them?
    • aneary
    • By aneary 10th Jul 17, 4:05 PM
    • 322 Posts
    • 198 Thanks
    aneary
    In which case where's the upside of telling them?
    Originally posted by Guest101

    If everyone followed your advised they would be waiting for a section 21 get evicted via the courts then having to pay more letting fees, getting a poor reference (if any) from the previous LL again and again.

    Sometimes it's worth following the LLs reasonable requests to live a quiet and less stressful life.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 10th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
    • 14,479 Posts
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    Guest101
    If everyone followed your advised they would be waiting for a section 21 - Well how else does one know the LL doesn't want them there any longer? get evicted via the courts - the ONLY way to be evicted? then having to pay more letting fees - that's optional , getting a poor reference (if any) from the previous LL again and again. - funnily enough, in over a decade of renting, I've never been served with a s.21 notice and have never had any issues, despite following my own advice on how to deal with LLs. Once I had a LL try to withhold my deposit. It was laughable, she accused me of harassment for using the arbitration service.

    Sometimes it's worth following the LLs reasonable requests to live a quiet and less stressful life.
    Originally posted by aneary


    I guess that's where we disagree, I don't think this is a reasonable request.
    • bxboards
    • By bxboards 11th Jul 17, 2:31 PM
    • 1,244 Posts
    • 985 Thanks
    bxboards
    I'm not sure whether Guest101 is being bloody minded, difficult for the sake of it, or here for 5 minute argument or the full half an hour! But there is little merit in being stubborn for a sake of it, and taking a contrary position that could risk damaging a good tenant - LL landlord relationship.

    Certainly as far as landlord insurance goes, one of the questions is 'number of occupants' and whether they are employed / not employed / asylum seeker etc. The quote will change depending on this The landlord is also under an obligation to inform their insurance company of any material changes which may affect the tenancy. I would have concerns about voiding that insurance if extra occupants sneak in.

    I cannot really see any merit behind Guest101's position, at the very least good manners cost nothing, and most landlords wish to know who is living in the house - as do most LL insurance policies.

    I think the original poster shows good manners and consideration for her LL, and I think they should as a courtesy inform them.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 11th Jul 17, 2:36 PM
    • 14,479 Posts
    • 14,182 Thanks
    Guest101
    I'm not sure whether Guest101 is being bloody minded, difficult for the sake of it, or here for 5 minute argument or the full half an hour! - I prefer ...is being accurate. But there is little merit in being stubborn for a sake of it, and taking a contrary position that could risk damaging a good tenant - LL landlord relationship. - indeed, a business relationship which has no scope to enter ones personal life.

    Certainly as far as landlord insurance goes, one of the questions is 'number of occupants' and whether they are employed / not employed / asylum seeker etc. - How would the LL know when this status changes? The quote will change depending on this The landlord is also under an obligation to inform their insurance company of any material changes which may affect the tenancy. - That is something for the LL to deal with, not the tenant. I would have concerns about voiding that insurance if extra occupants sneak in. - How does that affect the tenant?

    I cannot really see any merit behind Guest101's position, at the very least good manners cost nothing, and most landlords wish to know who is living in the house - as do most LL insurance policies. - I wish for a million pounds.....

    I think the original poster shows good manners and consideration for her LL, and I think they should as a courtesy inform them.
    Originally posted by bxboards
    Read the board a bit more and you'll work out my position.
    • Merrie
    • By Merrie 11th Jul 17, 7:10 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Merrie
    Just to add, if and when he does move in with all his belongings you will have to let the council know anyway, for the council tax reduction. I know you are going to tell them, just don't delay it.
    Good luck to you both
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