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  • FIRST POST
    • Shoequeeny
    • By Shoequeeny 6th Jul 17, 8:50 AM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Shoequeeny
    Survey or not to survey?
    • #1
    • 6th Jul 17, 8:50 AM
    Survey or not to survey? 6th Jul 17 at 8:50 AM
    I'm a first timer buyrer purchasing a shared ownership property that is 8 years old and is still under NHBC warranty. My mortgage adviser has told me I don't need a survey and that the valuation will flag up any major defects.

    My solicitor has told me I should at least get a condition survey.

    So two completely different sets of advice.

    If I get a survey I'm not even sure how it would work if the solicitor doesn't organise with the seller's solicitors?

    ...just being told a lot of different things and hard to know who's right!
Page 1
    • leespot
    • By leespot 6th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
    • 542 Posts
    • 434 Thanks
    leespot
    • #2
    • 6th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Jul 17, 9:19 AM
    I'm a first timer buyrer purchasing a shared ownership property that is 8 years old and is still under NHBC warranty. My mortgage adviser has told me I don't need a survey and that the valuation will flag up any major defects.

    My solicitor has told me I should at least get a condition survey.

    So two completely different sets of advice.

    If I get a survey I'm not even sure how it would work if the solicitor doesn't organise with the seller's solicitors?

    ...just being told a lot of different things and hard to know who's right!
    Originally posted by Shoequeeny
    Your mortgage adviser is being a muppet. Your solicitor is not.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Jul 17, 9:27 AM
    • 35,874 Posts
    • 151,062 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #3
    • 6th Jul 17, 9:27 AM
    • #3
    • 6th Jul 17, 9:27 AM
    Get a survey. If you are getting a mortgage, the lender will arrange it. Often you can get a discount if you arrange for the valuer to do it at the same time.
    • LEJC
    • By LEJC 6th Jul 17, 9:28 AM
    • 9,015 Posts
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    LEJC
    • #4
    • 6th Jul 17, 9:28 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Jul 17, 9:28 AM
    Take your solicitors advice....you are paying them....

    Your mortgage advisor advises on mortgages and if they were to be an expert in all things house buying my guess is that they too would be a solicitor!
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    • DumbMuscle
    • By DumbMuscle 6th Jul 17, 10:00 AM
    • 196 Posts
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    DumbMuscle
    • #5
    • 6th Jul 17, 10:00 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Jul 17, 10:00 AM
    How surveys work:

    You (or your mortgage provider) instruct a surveyor

    The surveyor gets in touch with the EA or seller to arrange a convenient time to do the survey, much the same as booking a viewing

    The survey gets done at the agreed time

    You get a report a short while later telling you the surveyor's findings. The solicitors only need to get involved if there are issues raised in the report which you want to renegotiate based on (or which may require indemnity insurance or similar)

    If you're instructing the surveyor yourself, all you need to give them is the address, the contact details of the EA, what kind of survey you want and a deadline (if applicable), and they will sort out the rest. If the mortgage provider is organising the survey, you just need to tell them what kind of survey you want.
    • cloo
    • By cloo 6th Jul 17, 10:52 AM
    • 879 Posts
    • 767 Thanks
    cloo
    • #6
    • 6th Jul 17, 10:52 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Jul 17, 10:52 AM
    A valuation will *not* flag up any major defects... they probably won't even go into the house, so at least a homebuyer survey, I expect a full structural won't be necessary.
    • NelliePie
    • By NelliePie 6th Jul 17, 11:22 AM
    • 85 Posts
    • 279 Thanks
    NelliePie
    • #7
    • 6th Jul 17, 11:22 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Jul 17, 11:22 AM
    It's not unreasonable of me to assume you're probably paying over a hundred thousand pounds for a house. A survey will cost you a couple of hundred pounds - and you get reassurance that you know what you're buying/dealing with. If its in good condition then a few hundred for the peace of mind is worth it, if its not in good condition or there are repairs needed then those few hundred pounds might give you negotiation room and save you money in the long run and you won't have any surprises. Seems like a no-brainer to me...
    Last edited by NelliePie; 06-07-2017 at 11:28 AM.
    When life gives you lemons, find the tequila!
    MFW: FTB June 2017 £144k. Target 128k June 2019
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 6th Jul 17, 12:11 PM
    • 3,529 Posts
    • 3,119 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #8
    • 6th Jul 17, 12:11 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Jul 17, 12:11 PM
    If I was buying a house 8 years old I would have a good look round to see for myself the condition. I would not bother getting a survey other than the obligatory valuation.

    True to say you won't get any detailed report from this, but if something major were amiss then they would take it into account. This is very unlikely in a property of that age, and far more likely in an old property where damp and cracks may be visible.

    But that is my own situation - just throwing it in to say that not having a survey is entirely possible and certainly not unusual. However, if I were a first time buyer with no knowledgeable person in the family to accompany me and give advice, I would probably have a survey done for peace of mind for the sake of £500 or whatever.
    • Blakey74
    • By Blakey74 6th Jul 17, 1:37 PM
    • 32 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Blakey74
    • #9
    • 6th Jul 17, 1:37 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Jul 17, 1:37 PM
    Valuation Surveys are done on behalf of the lender even though the buyer pays for it.

    You therefore have no come back if you move in and find out there are structural problems to the house which should have been picked up by the surveyor
    • n217970
    • By n217970 6th Jul 17, 1:40 PM
    • 172 Posts
    • 117 Thanks
    n217970
    Surveys are a waste of time and money at the best of times, even more so on an 8 year old house.
    • NelliePie
    • By NelliePie 6th Jul 17, 2:11 PM
    • 85 Posts
    • 279 Thanks
    NelliePie
    Surveys are a waste of time and money at the best of times, even more so on an 8 year old house.
    Originally posted by n217970
    Can I ask you to explain your views on this? I'd be interested in hearing your experiences of surveys.

    From personal experience I took out a buildings survey on the first property I bought (it was built mid 70's and was on the side of a hill) Although the survey showed that there was nothing structurally wrong with the house; it did highlight a few smaller repairs/points of note which we may not have noticed as FTB with no training. The cost of £600 allowed us to negotiate £10,000 of the cost of the house to cover the repairs.
    Last edited by NelliePie; 06-07-2017 at 2:21 PM.
    When life gives you lemons, find the tequila!
    MFW: FTB June 2017 £144k. Target 128k June 2019
    • aneary
    • By aneary 6th Jul 17, 2:18 PM
    • 487 Posts
    • 342 Thanks
    aneary
    I would say yes, mine noticed there were issues with the sash window, damage around the bath that I didn't notice plus and issue with the worktop the join was in the wrong place causing sealant problems the damage around the bath and worktop I would get fixed (my dad is a carpenter) and the windows I insisted on the sellers fixing as with Sash windows it can be a minor thing or a massive thing and you never know until you start fixing them, (in the end the sell fell through for other issues, but the windows were fixed).

    Obviously you are unlikely to have the sash window issue but damage around a bath could be possible as would the worktop and would you have anyone to sort out the problems or would you be paying out extra money for this.
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 6th Jul 17, 2:46 PM
    • 6,659 Posts
    • 47,159 Thanks
    kerri gt
    I would say yes, mine noticed there were issues with the sash window, damage around the bath that I didn't notice plus and issue with the worktop the join was in the wrong place causing sealant problems the damage around the bath and worktop I would get fixed (my dad is a carpenter) and the windows I insisted on the sellers fixing as with Sash windows it can be a minor thing or a massive thing and you never know until you start fixing them, (in the end the sell fell through for other issues, but the windows were fixed).

    Obviously you are unlikely to have the sash window issue but damage around a bath could be possible as would the worktop and would you have anyone to sort out the problems or would you be paying out extra money for this.
    Originally posted by aneary
    ^^ this. Ours flagged a note on the guttering at the back, we didn't renegotiate on the house price but added it to our list of things to do - likely wouldn't have noticed it otherwise. Had the guttering done this year and turned out some of the roof felt also needed replacing - saved us possibly more expensive problems down the line.
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    • n217970
    • By n217970 6th Jul 17, 4:11 PM
    • 172 Posts
    • 117 Thanks
    n217970
    Can I ask you to explain your views on this? I'd be interested in hearing your experiences of surveys.
    Originally posted by NelliePie
    The reports are full of unfounded backside covering. As I have a copy of the report from a recent sale handy I can tell you as per normal the gas and electric have been given a rating of 3, and the garage is apparently in immediate danger of collapse. As I dismissed it out of hand the buyers got their builder friend round who lived in the street to quote for demolishing the garage. He confirmed they are a pain to take down as they are so solidly built and in no danger of falling down. They bought the house and the garage is still there 6 months later. There was also plenty of misidentifications of materials. However one comment from the report really made me laugh.

    The gutters and downpipes appeared in satisfactory condition but the gutters are not precisely true and level in places
    Guess he has never heard of a fall.

    Here is another one for you - the same house had a sale fall through 15 months prior due to a BTL buyer trying to screw the price down at the last moment. The survey they had done on the property said a new roof was urgently required. Guess the roof fixed itself as it wasn't a problem second time round. I later found out the BTL investor was loosely connected to the surveyor, not that I am implying anything.
    • Shoequeeny
    • By Shoequeeny 7th Jul 17, 9:30 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Shoequeeny
    Thanks everyone!

    As this is a shared ownership you don't actually really get to negotiate on the cost - and the lender doesn't require a survey. Obviously, if major defects were found you could push back, but most likely I would just lose the place and my housing association deposit. Bit of a weird one.

    It sounds like the right move would be to get a basic one for piece of mind if nothing else.
    • sheff6107
    • By sheff6107 7th Jul 17, 12:36 PM
    • 439 Posts
    • 293 Thanks
    sheff6107
    Personally I'd get a full structural survey on anything other than a flat.
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 7th Jul 17, 12:56 PM
    • 1,060 Posts
    • 1,253 Thanks
    Surrey_EA
    Personally I'd get a full structural survey on anything other than a flat.
    Originally posted by sheff6107
    At the risk of sounding rather pedantic, what many people refer to as a 'full structural survey' is generally not a term used by surveyors any more.

    The term most commonly used is building survey, which is a survey carried out by an RICS Chartered Building Surveyor. It's a general inspection of all the visible parts of the property and covers defects, and maintenance issues.

    A structural survey is carried out by a structural engineer, and investigates the structural integrity of the building in detail.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 7th Jul 17, 1:21 PM
    • 7,235 Posts
    • 7,744 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    Valuation Surveys are done on behalf of the lender even though the buyer pays for it.

    You therefore have no come back if you move in and find out there are structural problems to the house which should have been picked up by the surveyor
    Originally posted by Blakey74
    In general you have no comeback from your survey either since the number of caveats in these reports make it practically impossible to take any action yourself. Any major issues should be dealt with by NHBC. Op should take a good long look themselves and only get a surveyor in if they spot something like major cracks.
    • LuckyG
    • By LuckyG 7th Jul 17, 1:40 PM
    • 139 Posts
    • 227 Thanks
    LuckyG
    I wasn't going to get a survey done on the house I'm buying due to it's age but my solicitor advised me to get one done.
    I just had the homebuyers survey, which is not a full buildings survey.
    It did pick up a few minor issues so it was useful in one respect.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 7th Jul 17, 2:26 PM
    • 7,235 Posts
    • 7,744 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    I wasn't going to get a survey done on the house I'm buying due to it's age but my solicitor advised me to get one done.
    I just had the homebuyers survey, which is not a full buildings survey.
    It did pick up a few minor issues so it was useful in one respect.
    Originally posted by LuckyG
    Well of course they would, if they didn't, then you could have comeback against them.

    This way they shuffle responsibility either to (a) you if you dont take one out, or (b) a surveyor, who shuffles their responsibility off into a reams worth of caveats.
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