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  • FIRST POST
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 5th Jul 17, 12:00 PM
    • 1,108Posts
    • 99Thanks
    aj9648
    Signs of subsidence?
    • #1
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:00 PM
    Signs of subsidence? 5th Jul 17 at 12:00 PM
    Hi

    I had someone come round to have a look at some work I wanted doing. Although not related to what he was quoting for he look out of the upstairs window and noticed the pointing on the outside brickwork had gone. His first question was has the house moved - I nearly fainted and was shocked that I had not spotted this.

    I had a look round the other parts of the house and could not see anything else. The back of the house is cladded and can't spot anything there

    Pic is at this link - https://twitter.com/payrollexcel/status/882553756554055680

    It's not the greatest picture but you can see three bricks that are of concern

    Should I be worried? Calling my insurer?

    Any ideas? I'm quite worried sick at the moment!!
Page 2
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Jul 17, 3:02 PM
    • 24,092 Posts
    • 66,730 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    The guy seem to think it was more to do with the plastering. Wasn't selling anything and said the paint needed to come off, put a membrane cure on and replaster and paint.

    Ill get some others to have a look
    Originally posted by aj9648
    That doesn't solve anything. You don't need a damp "specialist" at all. Especially not the one you just called out who is, frankly, incompetent. That's what you do after you solve the source of the problem, not how you solve it.

    You have a gaping crack in your house and a damp patch that seems to correspond. You do appear to have an interesting bit of movement there and the repair for both will be related. You need a builder, but first you need a structural engineer.

    You can either make the call to your insurers straight away or you can instruct a local structural engineer to come just for a visit, not a report straight away, just to offer an opinion on whether it's large enough issue for an insurance claim. It may well be that you have to take the insurance route, but if the remedy is less than the excess and subsequently increased premiums, it might be worth checking.

    I wonder if the extension is pulling on the house. As asked before, is there no evidence anywhere else? Inside or outside? You could have a look in the loft also. I would think it is somehow related to the extension but it isn't giving many clues.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 5th Jul 17, 7:03 PM
    • 6,410 Posts
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    Norman Castle
    I had a similar crack in a wall caused by adding a doorway next to an original doorway. The lintel for the new doorway was fitted under the end of the old lintel which allowed the old lintel to drop slightly. The brickwork above it rotated slightly leaving a crack starting close to the opposite corner of the old frame and ending about 3 feet above in the loft.
    Because of the new extension I would suspect an area of poorly supported brickwork before subsidence.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 5th Jul 17, 7:29 PM
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    aj9648
    Thanks for the responses. The extension was done in 1985. Would a problem not have materialised in that time if it was serious?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Jul 17, 7:47 PM
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    Doozergirl
    Looking at what Norman Castle says, is the door into the extension near to the crack? On the window side of the room?
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 5th Jul 17, 7:59 PM
    • 1,108 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    aj9648
    Looking at what Norman Castle says, is the door into the extension near to the crack? On the window side of the room?
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    The extension was built adjoining the garage. its a 2 storey extension. The only door upstairs is the bedroom door but this is relatively quite a long way away from where the crack is 3-4m I would say.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 6th Jul 17, 6:38 AM
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    Gloomendoom
    Based on experience, I'd be wary of involving the insurance company until you are absolutely certain that it is subsidence and/or you are sure you need to claim.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • aj9648
    • By aj9648 8th Jul 17, 6:25 AM
    • 1,108 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    aj9648
    Rang a few structural engineers - won't even come out to look and want to charge £500+ and do a survey!!
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 8th Jul 17, 7:07 AM
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    • 5,186 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    ^ I would fill the crack and monitor it. If there is no more movement this would suggest it is an area of brickwork settling after the extension work.

    A chartered surveyor visited my property and seemed very unclear about what caused a large subsidence crack (Vast Sycamore tree very close to the rear of property. The crack developed as the tree grew and stopped moving as the tree growth slowed). He also created extra work by considering every crack potentially subsidence although most proved to be from later alterations.

    If there are damp patches near the red circled area I would suspect the roof, gully or gutters. Check it after rain.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 08-07-2017 at 7:31 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 8th Jul 17, 7:28 AM
    • 13,265 Posts
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    Gloomendoom
    Rang a few structural engineers - won't even come out to look and want to charge £500+ and do a survey!!
    Originally posted by aj9648
    When I had a similar issue, I called in a surveyor who specialised in subsidence. It cost me a couple of hundred from memory and I got a pretty detailed report out of it. However, that was fifteen years ago.

    It was enough to convince my insurers that the house wasn't suffering from subsidence.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 8th Jul 17, 9:25 AM
    • 24,092 Posts
    • 66,730 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    The more I read about structural engineers, the more I appreciate ours.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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