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  • FIRST POST
    • illusionek
    • By illusionek 1st Jul 17, 2:40 PM
    • 94Posts
    • 19Thanks
    illusionek
    painting a room
    • #1
    • 1st Jul 17, 2:40 PM
    painting a room 1st Jul 17 at 2:40 PM
    I look for a really good idiot's guide to painting. I have never painted a room before, I know silly, and now would like to paint my dining and living room including ceiling roses, coving and skirting.

    The idea is to paint a smallish bedroom first as a practice run.

    Unfortunately I have no clue what I need to do and what tools are required. Obviously I googled the subject but most websites/youtube tutorials I found are very basic and I am at the stage where I am not even sure how to clean paintbrush after use i.e. can I just pour the water I used to clean the brush into the sink or will this cause clogged drains in the future? I hope this shows how inexperienced I am

    Many thanks!
Page 1
    • Sicard
    • By Sicard 2nd Jul 17, 9:14 AM
    • 588 Posts
    • 486 Thanks
    Sicard
    • #2
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:14 AM
    • #2
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:14 AM
    It's a whole lot easier and faster to paint an empty room.

    Rollers will speed up the job a lot. Maybe 2 to 3 different sized brushes. I'd seal unused roller dishes and rollers with tied plastic bags to stop drying out. I always worked from the top downwards, ceiling, walls, woodwork. Cutting in takes up a lot of time and I'd sometimes do that first. It's a lot easier to match colours so if cutting in isn't accurate it won't show so much. Oil based paints need white spirit to clean the brushes and they take longer to dry and the smell lingers. Water based paints smell less and the brushes are cleaned with water (soapy then clean). I used kitchen sink to clean latter but dumped oil based waste in corner of garden so as to not contaminate sewers.
    Part of the inhumanity of the computer is that, once it is competently programmed and working smoothly, it is completely honest.
    Isaac Asimov
    • illusionek
    • By illusionek 2nd Jul 17, 7:07 PM
    • 94 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    illusionek
    • #3
    • 2nd Jul 17, 7:07 PM
    • #3
    • 2nd Jul 17, 7:07 PM
    Great advise above, any tips how to get straight lines when cutting in? I was thinking about using paint guard.

    I am going to use apply below basecoat on walls and ceiling as both are less than perfect. Do I need to pain then ceiling again using proper white paint or below would be sufficient?

    Also below seems to be really expensive so I wonder if there are some other alternatives?


    http://www.diy.com/departments/polycell-3-in-1-white-matt-basecoat-7l/316181_BQ.prd
    • tiz
    • By tiz 2nd Jul 17, 9:06 PM
    • 51 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    tiz
    • #4
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:06 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:06 PM
    Use a paint brush to 'edge' the room, going around the corners, skirting etc. where you won't fit a roller. When doing it feather the paint in towards the wall centre so you don't end up with a thick edge. Have a damp cloth ready and if you accidentally get the paint where you don't want it clean it straight away and it will wipe off. Covering the carpet is a good idea. Then roller. Splodge some paint in a tray, roll the roller back and forth through it and then on the wall. In between coats cling film the roller as they take a lot of effort to clean. Wall paint is usually water based and you can just wash in the sink. The tins will say on them what you need.
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 2nd Jul 17, 9:10 PM
    • 1,938 Posts
    • 5,026 Thanks
    Loanranger
    • #5
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:10 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:10 PM
    Paint ceiling and walls in the same colour emulsion so no need for straight lines at tops of walls.
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 2nd Jul 17, 9:17 PM
    • 6,576 Posts
    • 46,611 Thanks
    kerri gt
    • #6
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:17 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Jul 17, 9:17 PM
    I'm terrible with a roller (dad used paint pads and taught me to use them too) but I'm trying to get better with a roller, my best advise with them is don't roll too fast. Load the roller up with paint (don't overload) apply to wall then slowly spread this out over the wall...slowly being the operative word to avoid splashes.
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
    JAN NSD 11/16


    • Paul the Painter
    • By Paul the Painter 5th Jul 17, 12:18 AM
    • 758 Posts
    • 622 Thanks
    Paul the Painter
    • #7
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:18 AM
    • #7
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:18 AM
    Start at the top
    Loosen switches and sockets before you start
    Easier/quicker to do a couple of rooms over a couple of days than 1 room completely before moving onto the next
    Don't be afraid to paint well over the boundary to the next colour (just let it dry thoroughly, and halves the amount of cutting in)
    Fill all the holes/cracks and sand down before you get a brush out.
    Put on the first coat
    Let dry and fill all the holes and cracks you missed the first time around
    Cut in with brush first, then roll
    Cling film around brushes used for oil based paint, just clean the ones used with water based paint. (Cling film protected brushes will be good for well over a week)
    Roller speed about 1 foot/second
    If you are only doing the occasional bit of painting, just him the tiler when you are done.
    If using more than one colour of paint, separate roller sleeve for each colour, don't try to clean in between.

    Easy sand filler is great, pre-mixed stuff is generally terrible. A caulking gun and a tube of flexible decorators filler is great for filling gaps/cracks around does/Windows/skirting/corners of the room - powder filler is terrible for this. It

    It should take you about 1/2 - 2/3 of the time on preparation. If you are spending less than half the time on preparation it will not be a good job.

    Good luck!

    p.s. a small amount of water based paint down the drain is fine, don't go tipping half a tin down there - drain will not clog, but it just doesn't seem right.
    Unless it is damaged or discontinued - ignore any discount of over 25%
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 5th Jul 17, 12:04 PM
    • 29,116 Posts
    • 17,411 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:04 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:04 PM
    if planning to do a few rooms worth spending a bit on some of the tools for the job.

    It can get tiring as you use body parts not used normally might be trying to do 2 rooms will be too much so a good idea to pace yourself with one to start with, a bit more set up and cleaning but worth it.

    Unlike a pro that needs to optimize time and are fit, if you can spread it out over a few days you can get a better result than trying to do it tired. (arms will ache a lot)

    Empty room makes life a lot easier and you can put down a full cover dust sheets, old sheets etc are OK but a good set of dust sheets not too expensive. also if you can not use the room for a few days you can shut the door and save on setup/clean down time

    There are plastic film ones that are cheap but I don't like them, OK to go under regular sheets in case of a big spill.

    preparation is the key to success.

    Prep the walls fill, sand ,clean, fill, sand, clean etc. take your time and prep everything this is the bit that makes the rest of the job easy.

    take out the dust sheet and give a good shake before starting the paint job.

    I found a step of some sort to make reaching the ceiling/wall for cutting in worth considering, we have a stepper stool but if not(or doing more decorating) I would look at one of the small work platforms to give a much longer reach and not need moving so much or a large platform step(some come with trays for the paint pot).
    Not too heavy they need moving round the room.

    The other tool is a good pole and decent roller cage to do the ceiling and top of the walls(might not need it for the walls if you have the reach)

    As you have coving the cutting in should be relatively easy

    I would plan 2 coats there can be a tendency to try to cover in one go, I think you get a much better finish with 2 thinner coats and you get to practice cutting in, after the first coat you will see how good your prep was and can do touch ups before finishing with the second coat

    cutting in, get a good brush, I found the angle one better, the trick is getting the right amount of paint to do long single strokes, the steady hand comes with a bit of practice.

    I found guards or tape just bleed or takes longer than a bit of practice.

    I like white ceilings and do the coving the same color, over paint to the wall.

    Then cut into the coving/skirting/achitraves and blend in with the roller,
    I keep spreading till the cover is even and blend into the previous pass starting a new one as the roller empties, you get a feel fairly quickly, the trick is to work quick enough to keep a wet edge but no so quick you get covered in paint. if careful you can get very close to the woodwork so hardly any brushed area shows.

    then you have the wood work to work on(prepped already) if doing 2 coats on the walls you could do the first coat of the woodwork between them.

    We have gone for matt woodwork using Dulux diamond, if going gloss you might want to consider which order you do walls and woodwork.

    I don't do long days, I go for a day to clear the room and start prepping till tired or fed up, keep prepping next day till done,

    A small room can get both ceiling&wall coats done in a day larger area spread over 2 days, woodwork often a day per coat.

    if fitter than me and prepared to put in more hours a smallish room empty can be done over a weekend if not to bad too start with.


    There is a trade off between cost quality and time when it comes to some equipment, some just throw thing out rather than spend the time cleaning them

    For cleaning rollers I have an 2 ltr bottle top cut to act as a a circular scraper I push it through and that cleans off most of the surplus.
    (just right for 9" rollers)

    I then have another that I use to soak if I don't want to do a full clean straight away just drop it in with soapy warm water.

    Stick to water based products for everything much easier.


    Forgot, I loosen all electrics and tape up. Roll into the area covered by them much neater finish.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 5th Jul 17, 12:18 PM
    • 391 Posts
    • 366 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    • #9
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:18 PM
    • #9
    • 5th Jul 17, 12:18 PM
    Weirdly enough, I have always preferred to roller first and then cut in but my wife prefers the other way round.

    My reasoning is that I'll use less paint because after I've rollered I can use the rest from the tray to brush with, whereas my wife usually overpaints with the cutting in and then often has less to roller with.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 5th Jul 17, 5:19 PM
    • 2,032 Posts
    • 2,812 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    As you can see from the replies here, there's no hard and fast rules to this.

    I would suggest you do what we all had to do at some point - just get in there and start painting. It probably won't be perfect, but the second room you paint will be better, and by the third you'll be starting to know what you're doing.

    My personal tip - keep a damp cloth in your back pocket for quick mopping up of accidental splashes. So much easier to sort out if you do it immediately.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 5th Jul 17, 7:21 PM
    • 5,944 Posts
    • 4,693 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    I used kitchen sink to clean latter but dumped oil based waste in corner of garden so as to not contaminate sewers.
    Originally posted by Sicard
    I use a jam jar to clean brushes with white spirits. After cleaning put the lid on and leave it for a few weeks. The paint will separate and sink to the bottom leaving clean white spirits above. Pour this into a clean jam jar ready for next time.
    Environmentally friendly and money saving.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 7th Jul 17, 7:24 AM
    • 29,116 Posts
    • 17,411 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Weirdly enough, I have always preferred to roller first and then cut in but my wife prefers the other way round.

    My reasoning is that I'll use less paint because after I've rollered I can use the rest from the tray to brush with, whereas my wife usually overpaints with the cutting in and then often has less to roller with.
    Originally posted by bertiewhite
    I aim to load the tray with not enough paint, then top up with just the right amount as that color nears completion(cut then roll).
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 7th Jul 17, 7:37 AM
    • 59,116 Posts
    • 345,135 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    Start using only white paint .... it's cheapest and will at least leave you with a good plain base coat .... at worst decide that "white's nice, I'll leave it like that". Don't go "practising" with pricey coloured paint that you might hate once it's dried.

    All paint looks different on the cardboard swatch, the front of the tin, when you open the lid, when you first paint it on the wall and when it dries. It also looks different on different walls depending how the light falls.

    So, for practising, only buy white paint ..... white is good
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 7th Jul 17, 7:57 AM
    • 6,791 Posts
    • 2,993 Thanks
    buglawton
    I use a jam jar to clean brushes with white spirits. After cleaning put the lid on and leave it for a few weeks. The paint will separate and sink to the bottom leaving clean white spirits above. Pour this into a clean jam jar ready for next time.
    Environmentally friendly and money saving.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    You'll be meaning, brushes used with oil based paints? All interior wall paints except special purpose ones would be water-washable, with a bit of washing up liquid.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 7th Jul 17, 11:15 AM
    • 5,944 Posts
    • 4,693 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    You'll be meaning, brushes used with oil based paints?
    Originally posted by buglawton
    Yes, as advised on the paint can.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 10th Jul 17, 8:52 AM
    • 391 Posts
    • 366 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    I aim to load the tray with not enough paint, then top up with just the right amount as that color nears completion(cut then roll).
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    If that works for you then fair enough, but if I roller first I can get as close to the edge as possible and will have to cut in less. My wife uses too much paint cutting in first because she can't judge how close the roller will be so overlaps WAY too much.
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