Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • shadowqueen
    • By shadowqueen 20th Jun 17, 8:17 AM
    • 23Posts
    • 10Thanks
    shadowqueen
    If you leave all your social media passwords belong to us
    • #1
    • 20th Jun 17, 8:17 AM
    If you leave all your social media passwords belong to us 20th Jun 17 at 8:17 AM
    I'm currently job-seeking and before I signed an offer I asked for a copy of their employee handbook.

    Bear in mind this is not for a marketing or sales company nor is it a marketing or sales position.

    One clause states that upon leaving, you must hand over all LinkedIn contacts made during your employment as well as your personal LinkedIn password.

    Another clause states that if you are suspected of having said something "wrong" on your personal social media you must hand over all social media passwords.

    This isn't enforceable right? It's contravening most social media's terms of use as it is.

    Other gems from this employee handbook include a ban on all shoes that management doesn't approve of, including shoes with heels or sandals and a very vague clause about doing you for misconduct if they feel your sickness is your fault including all sickness caused by taking in hazardous activity.

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 06-07-2017 at 12:59 PM.
Page 3
    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 9th Jul 17, 2:41 PM
    • 4,559 Posts
    • 7,196 Thanks
    Gavin83
    My father's employer tried to get him to sign that he had to get company permission, in writing, for all paid and voluntary work done by him or any member of his family. It was worded so badly that he's have needed to get permission just to run a neighbour to the shops!
    Originally posted by marlot
    What does your father do?

    It's common for a company to ask you to request their permission if you wish to take up further work and I can see why they'd do this. However I don't see how a company has any right over the work done by other people!

    I'd say for him it would be enforceable, for his family members not at all.
    • Rosemary7391
    • By Rosemary7391 9th Jul 17, 3:04 PM
    • 1,836 Posts
    • 3,188 Thanks
    Rosemary7391
    What does your father do?

    It's common for a company to ask you to request their permission if you wish to take up further work and I can see why they'd do this. However I don't see how a company has any right over the work done by other people!

    I'd say for him it would be enforceable, for his family members not at all.
    Originally posted by Gavin83
    For volunteering, seriously? How is that reasonable?
    Me escondo detras de mi lengua... tengo miedo de que me entiendas... pero me gustara que me entendases ¡Ayudame!
    • Undervalued
    • By Undervalued 9th Jul 17, 5:51 PM
    • 3,113 Posts
    • 2,838 Thanks
    Undervalued
    For volunteering, seriously? How is that reasonable?
    Originally posted by Rosemary7391
    If it is made clear, up front, that it is a condition of working there then how is it not reasonable?

    If you want the job it is on these terms. If you don't agree work somewhere else.

    Some volunteering situations could easily conflict with an employer's business. Extensive other work, paid or otherwise, could well affect an employee's ability to perform their duties.
    • Rosemary7391
    • By Rosemary7391 9th Jul 17, 6:32 PM
    • 1,836 Posts
    • 3,188 Thanks
    Rosemary7391
    If it is made clear, up front, that it is a condition of working there then how is it not reasonable?

    If you want the job it is on these terms. If you don't agree work somewhere else.

    Some volunteering situations could easily conflict with an employer's business. Extensive other work, paid or otherwise, could well affect an employee's ability to perform their duties.
    Originally posted by Undervalued
    If it's common (as the post I quoted suggested) the choice may not be there. I've never come across it though. I understand what you're saying about agreeing to it in the contract and would not do so myself (unless the alternative was starving etc of course!). That doesn't mean that any proposed contract is reasonable. It also doesn't mean that any agreed contract is reasonable - rarely are employment contracts between entities with equal power (especially financially) and that skews things. It's also why we have laws and rights you can't just sign away in a contract.

    I'm not sure how frequently volunteering and employment conflict - I'm struggling to come up with plausible scenarios, let alone likely ones. Voluntary organisations are unlikely to be competitors of businesses, and any conflict of interest eg in financial work would just be declared in the normal manner? And your latter point is just as true of many common hobbies/pastimes - is it reasonable to expect an employee to ask their employer's permission to partake of those? My opinion is that after my work is done, I should be able to spend my time as I chose provided I can turn up for work ready to go the next time I'm required.
    Me escondo detras de mi lengua... tengo miedo de que me entiendas... pero me gustara que me entendases ¡Ayudame!
    • Undervalued
    • By Undervalued 9th Jul 17, 8:12 PM
    • 3,113 Posts
    • 2,838 Thanks
    Undervalued
    If it's common (as the post I quoted suggested) the choice may not be there. I've never come across it though. I understand what you're saying about agreeing to it in the contract and would not do so myself (unless the alternative was starving etc of course!). That doesn't mean that any proposed contract is reasonable. It also doesn't mean that any agreed contract is reasonable - rarely are employment contracts between entities with equal power (especially financially) and that skews things. It's also why we have laws and rights you can't just sign away in a contract.

    I'm not sure how frequently volunteering and employment conflict - I'm struggling to come up with plausible scenarios, let alone likely ones. Voluntary organisations are unlikely to be competitors of businesses, and any conflict of interest eg in financial work would just be declared in the normal manner? And your latter point is just as true of many common hobbies/pastimes - is it reasonable to expect an employee to ask their employer's permission to partake of those? My opinion is that after my work is done, I should be able to spend my time as I chose provided I can turn up for work ready to go the next time I'm required.
    Originally posted by Rosemary7391
    Yes, but that is not one of them.
    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 9th Jul 17, 9:56 PM
    • 4,559 Posts
    • 7,196 Thanks
    Gavin83
    For volunteering, seriously? How is that reasonable?
    Originally posted by Rosemary7391
    I can think of several reasons why an employer wouldn't want you taking paid work elsewhere including making you too tired for your actual job, potential conflict of interest and even the possibility of you being offered alternative work. All of these would apply equally to voluntary and paid work.

    I'm not 100% if it has included volunteering but every job I've had has included a clause about working elsewhere. I had to use it recently in my current job.
    • Rosemary7391
    • By Rosemary7391 9th Jul 17, 10:32 PM
    • 1,836 Posts
    • 3,188 Thanks
    Rosemary7391
    Could either of you describe a common volunteering - job conflict of interest that wouldn't be handled by the normal conflict of interest mechanism in the job? I'm just not getting it, sorry.

    The other points apply equally to hobbies so I'm not sure why they wouldn't be included - if someone turns up too tired to do their job it doesn't really matter if it's due to volunteering, being hungover or a rowdy neighbour, the employee needs to fix it or they'll get disciplined and eventually fired. I'd understand notifying for some jobs, but asking permission is just too far in my opinion.
    Me escondo detras de mi lengua... tengo miedo de que me entiendas... pero me gustara que me entendases ¡Ayudame!
    • jbond
    • By jbond 10th Jul 17, 9:24 AM
    • 62 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    jbond
    I'm currently job-seeking and before I signed an offer I asked for a copy of their employee handbook.

    One clause states that upon leaving, you must hand over all LinkedIn contacts made during your employment as well as your personal LinkedIn password.

    Another clause states that if you are suspected of having said something "wrong" on your personal social media you must hand over all social media passwords.

    This isn't enforceable right? It's contravening most social media's terms of use as it is.
    Originally posted by shadowqueen
    I work in tech and yes I've been in work many years now, moving around every one to two years. I have four offers on the table currently and while this job is on paper the best, it's the only one that's mentioned these things.

    If I get sideswiped by a lorry while cycling to work and have to go to hospital do I need to worry about being done for misconduct because cycling is a hazardous activity?

    I personally can't believe you're all so willing to hand over all your social media passwords.
    Originally posted by shadowqueen
    I'm going to say something here, that I don't think anyone else has mentioned so far (and possibly be wrong with it too)?
    Shadowqueen, I don't want to be rude, but was this some kind of setup question, to see what sort of reaction you'd get?
    I ask, because you say you work in tech, so really, you should of been more than aware of the general answers BEFORE you even posted the question?
    You work in tech, and you're seriously asking whether you should be giving passwords out or not?!
    If you didn't know the answer to that..... well, the mind boggles!
    I agree that you may not be familiar with the legal side of things, employment contracts etc, but you should know about passwords!
    If they are PERSONAL accts, tell them to f*ck *ff! If they are purely to do with work, then of course you supply those, but then I'd expect them to know the passwords anyway?

    I'd also like to know what they'd class as 'suspicion' that you'd said something wrong on social media?!

    I know you've mentioned other stuff that I have sympathy with you on, but apart from that.......
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,232Posts Today

9,748Users online

Martin's Twitter