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    • RHYSDAD
    • By RHYSDAD 19th Jun 17, 3:52 PM
    • 2,191Posts
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    RHYSDAD
    Primary school homework
    • #1
    • 19th Jun 17, 3:52 PM
    Primary school homework 19th Jun 17 at 3:52 PM
    I'm at the end of my tether with the amount my boys are getting. Alongside the 15 minutes reading, spellings, mental maths and English comprehension, they also (because as a family we obviously have b ugger all else to do) are set really in depth projects that my boys have no interest or enthusiasm for. I can't MAKE them be interested in it all. I agree wholeheartedly with the first four but trying to get a 9 year ASD child to understand how and why we call elections and to understand the office of Prime Minister is frankly tantamount to be driven insane. Even our four year old is set mini projects. Talk about hammer them into the ground.... 😤
    I don't remember being set any when I went to primary school
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Page 1
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 19th Jun 17, 4:13 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
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    Guest101
    • #2
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:13 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:13 PM
    I'm at the end of my tether with the amount my boys are getting. Alongside the 15 minutes reading, spellings, mental maths and English comprehension, they also (because as a family we obviously have b ugger all else to do) are set really in depth projects that my boys have no interest or enthusiasm for. I can't MAKE them be interested in it all. I agree wholeheartedly with the first four but trying to get a 9 year ASD child to understand how and why we call elections and to understand the office of Prime Minister is frankly tantamount to be driven insane. Even our four year old is set mini projects. Talk about hammer them into the ground.... 😤
    I don't remember being set any when I went to primary school
    Originally posted by RHYSDAD


    You cant be bothered to explain to a 9 year old why we have elections? Surely a simple grasp of why and how it works isn't too difficult. There's a odds on chance theyt've covered the topic at school, so you wont be starting from scratch
    • mark5
    • By mark5 19th Jun 17, 4:18 PM
    • 1,186 Posts
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    mark5
    • #3
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:18 PM
    • #3
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:18 PM
    Totally agree, my 8 year old typically gets 80-90 pages of level 15 books to read each week, maths homework, English homework, spelling words to learn and as you say silly projects she has no interest in as she's fed up of all the other homework and just wants time to herself.

    I can't see anything changing though!
    • mark5
    • By mark5 19th Jun 17, 4:25 PM
    • 1,186 Posts
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    mark5
    • #4
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:25 PM
    • #4
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:25 PM
    You cant be bothered to explain to a 9 year old why we have elections? Surely a simple grasp of why and how it works isn't too difficult. There's a odds on chance theyt've covered the topic at school, so you wont be starting from scratch
    Originally posted by Guest101

    They come home from school, want to relax and play and your straight on their case to get on with homework, they don't want to learn at that point they just want to relax.

    It's much more intense than it was in the 80's!
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 19th Jun 17, 4:54 PM
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    Guest101
    • #5
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:54 PM
    • #5
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:54 PM
    They come home from school, want to relax and play and your straight on their case to get on with homework, they don't want to learn at that point they just want to relax.

    It's much more intense than it was in the 80's!
    Originally posted by mark5


    That's ok. If that's what you choose to do.


    But if or when they fall behind, and are struggling to learn new material because they don't understand the old - who will be to blame?


    Presumably it will be the fault of the school?
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 19th Jun 17, 4:55 PM
    • 15,811 Posts
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    FBaby
    • #6
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:55 PM
    • #6
    • 19th Jun 17, 4:55 PM
    I can't MAKE them be interested in it all
    For one, homework is not about being engaging about interesting activities, it's about additional work to embed the learning. It's not fun and it's another thing in life we do because the effort put in will pay off some day. It's just discipline.

    Of course, it works better if you can find a way to make it not so daunting, and have some form of reward to look forward to.
    • lilmiss1982
    • By lilmiss1982 19th Jun 17, 5:37 PM
    • 1,258 Posts
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    lilmiss1982
    • #7
    • 19th Jun 17, 5:37 PM
    • #7
    • 19th Jun 17, 5:37 PM
    I would suggest speaking to school about the homework set. If your child has special educational needs it might not be realistic for them to complete exactly the same tasks as the rest of the class for homework and they should look at adaptions.

    You should speak with the class teacher and then the head.

    They should be able to help.

    My son's school have been excellent as we had issues with homework. My son was told if he spent a set amount of time on it and it was incomplete it was ok if he had put the time in.
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    • indsty
    • By indsty 19th Jun 17, 5:53 PM
    • 352 Posts
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    indsty
    • #8
    • 19th Jun 17, 5:53 PM
    • #8
    • 19th Jun 17, 5:53 PM
    Definitely speak to the teacher concerned and let her know your difficulties. But a lot of "project" stuff can be included in day to day life. Start conversations at the tea table, while coming home from school, while in the park, visiting the library - education can be included from the time they wake up until they go to bed.

    I am not saying they shouldn't have their "me" time, playtime, sports time, just make use of any time you do have - if you seem interested in a subject then they will be too. If you see it as a chore you can't expect them to do otherwise.
    • barbiedoll
    • By barbiedoll 19th Jun 17, 7:22 PM
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    barbiedoll
    • #9
    • 19th Jun 17, 7:22 PM
    • #9
    • 19th Jun 17, 7:22 PM
    Try what we did and space the work out over the evening.

    Any hardcore written work had to be done before any playtime/console time etc. We used to do the spellings every morning and evening on the way to and from the childminder (10 min walk each way). Mental maths was 10 mins before bed and reading was 15 mins in bed (school) and half an hour of reading of own choice (mostly comics, but it's all reading!)

    You think it's bad now, just wait till they're doing GCSE maths...it's completely incomprehensible!
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    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 19th Jun 17, 8:32 PM
    • 1,171 Posts
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    Fireflyaway
    My child's school is the opposite. Virtually no homework and now in year 6 its a short worksheet that takes ten minutes. No reading etc. Going to be a big shock when senior school starts in September.
    I think some homework is good. If you want to get ahead in life, putting in some extra effort is a good habit to get into. However.... Too much might put the child off learning and end up being counterproductive. Talk to the teacher and see what other parents think, but in the meantime try to be positive. If you start to complain and belittle the value of homework your child will most likely pick up on it and become even less enthused.
    • warehouse
    • By warehouse 19th Jun 17, 8:51 PM
    • 2,969 Posts
    • 5,541 Thanks
    warehouse
    I'm at the end of my tether with the amount my boys are getting. Alongside the 15 minutes reading, spellings, mental maths and English comprehension, they also (because as a family we obviously have b ugger all else to do) are set really in depth projects that my boys have no interest or enthusiasm for. I can't MAKE them be interested in it all. I agree wholeheartedly with the first four but trying to get a 9 year ASD child to understand how and why we call elections and to understand the office of Prime Minister is frankly tantamount to be driven insane. Even our four year old is set mini projects. Talk about hammer them into the ground.... 😤
    I don't remember being set any when I went to primary school
    Originally posted by RHYSDAD
    Yeah I get it, I've been there, but now I look back it's probably the best thing that could have happened.

    My eldest is 19 now. At primary school she was given vast amounts of homework, many of the parents complained, I also thought it was a bit too much, but we got on with it. It soon becomes the norm and you get used to it.

    When she was at the end of year 4 we moved to a different area and she went to a new school. Not only was there hardly any homework but she was MILES ahead of all the other kids in every subject, it was quite a shock. Because of that when it came to take the exams for secondary school she smashed it.

    She got A*, A, A in her A levels last year and got the University she wanted. She got in the hall of fame for her school and currently has her picture on the wall. All that because she got a fantastic start to her education at a primary school that cared enough to give her a lot of homework.

    Embrace it.
    Pants
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 19th Jun 17, 9:22 PM
    • 1,063 Posts
    • 668 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    Can you try to make the homework more interesting ?

    Someone with ASD will only survive after school, by being more qualified than anyone else applying for the job.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 19th Jun 17, 9:30 PM
    • 2,755 Posts
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    gettingtheresometime
    And don't forget they will be competing with children who had homework in primary school.

    Couldn't you introduce the concept using your household as an example?
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    • svain
    • By svain 19th Jun 17, 11:01 PM
    • 153 Posts
    • 294 Thanks
    svain
    Absolute disgrace how much homework kids get .... Its just another nail in the coffin of childhood
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 20th Jun 17, 1:51 AM
    • 37,664 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    Saw an interesting facebook post from a mum who had written to the school to say her DD would in future be doing a lot less homework. She described how much was expected, and also said that it was on medical advice because her DD had become stressed and anxious about school.

    A few days later there was a post saying "I am now home educating my DD."
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    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 20th Jun 17, 6:53 AM
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    GwylimT
    When I was teaching secondary it was clear which students had been accustomed to homework, more secure knowledge as each equation etc had been used more, also much better at having a go at things without adult intervention.

    When I was at the school the average year seven pupil would have around an hour of homework per night, if my daughters school didn't give homework, then I personally would, she is in year 2.
    • lush walrus
    • By lush walrus 20th Jun 17, 7:19 AM
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    lush walrus
    How long does it really take, as others have said it's all down to method. One of our daughters homework was learning about planets last week, quick look on U tube and found the planet song, she loved it learnt the song and now knows the number, name, size and how many moons each planet has.

    At the weekend we borrowed a teloscope and as a treat we arranged to wake the girls up on Saturday night show them all the planets. They loved it, we enjoyed ourselves also and they all now understand a lot about the universe. We enjoy themed homework with our children as it gives us a window into their day and a focus of a discussion we can have together. We do far less pushing with our children than most of our friends. Our youngest who was given the homework is 5.

    As others have said it's up to you if you think you don't have time to do it, then don't do it. If you think your child can't cope then by all means spend energy complaining to the school. But do this aware that other parents do find the time and are pushing their children's knowledge on and when your children are out in the world competing guess who they will be competing against...
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 20th Jun 17, 7:25 AM
    • 19,510 Posts
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    Spendless
    I'm surprised that the school wants a 9yo to know about elections, IME schools become only interested in their pupils knowing about what's on the national curriculum and if it's not likely to turn up as an examination question on a GCSE paper, then they're not overly bothered about their pupil knowing about it. I'm pretty sure this wasn't something my two (now 14 & 17) were ever taught because I took the pair of them into the ballot booth with me in the recent GE and they never said anything that any knowledge they had about the process came from school.

    I'd query with the school about how much homework a child of yours age should be getting.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 20th Jun 17, 10:20 AM
    • 13,454 Posts
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    onlyroz
    Our primary school used to give masses of homework. Pages and pages of maths problems each week (which would leave both me and my son in tears with the stress), a weekly written exercise, times tables practice, reading practice and a half-termly project. We would be spending hours and hours each week slogging through it all, with much tears and stress.


    Thankfully now the new headteacher is far more sensible. Now it's just times tables and spellings practice, reading, and a longer project once a year.


    I'd have a word with the class teacher and say that your child won't be doing all the homework, and that you'll just be sticking with the reading, spellings and times tables.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 20th Jun 17, 12:50 PM
    • 3,576 Posts
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    sheramber
    If your child doesn't do the homework he will be at a disadvantage in the classroom against the rest of class who have done it.

    Does he want to be the one who doesn't know?
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