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  • FIRST POST
    • sl_jones
    • By sl_jones 19th Jun 17, 10:28 AM
    • 53Posts
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    sl_jones
    Rough cost for converting conservatory to extension?
    • #1
    • 19th Jun 17, 10:28 AM
    Rough cost for converting conservatory to extension? 19th Jun 17 at 10:28 AM
    Hi all,

    Another one of my mad property questions.

    I've seen this house in West Wickham, Kent which has an extremely large conservatory. I think the best thing to do would(or at least in order for us to make the best of the property) be to knock the kitchen down and make the conservatory into an extension.

    The only issue is cost, the conservatory itself has a brick wall on the right and the foundation and everything has been built, in my mind it would just be a case of building two walls and adding french/bi folding doors and installing the kitchen.

    I would estimate it to be around 25K? Thats for standard kitchen (not high end). But i would be interested to see what other people have to say, or if they have done this to their own house?

    Here is house:
    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-47359128.html

    The estate agent has said that he has had offers but they have all been under asking, i think i would looking to offer 440 or around that.

    Let me know your thoughts guys!
Page 1
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 19th Jun 17, 10:44 AM
    • 731 Posts
    • 557 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    • #2
    • 19th Jun 17, 10:44 AM
    • #2
    • 19th Jun 17, 10:44 AM
    No one can say if it can be converted. Safest bet is to cost for knocking it down and starting again so it meets current building regs.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 19th Jun 17, 11:14 AM
    • 1,398 Posts
    • 1,636 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    • #3
    • 19th Jun 17, 11:14 AM
    • #3
    • 19th Jun 17, 11:14 AM
    It's a lean-to conservatory, without any brick walls. I'd be very surprised if the foundations will be up to spec for what you want to do.
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 19th Jun 17, 12:40 PM
    • 3,203 Posts
    • 7,122 Thanks
    onomatopoeia99
    • #4
    • 19th Jun 17, 12:40 PM
    • #4
    • 19th Jun 17, 12:40 PM
    The only issue is cost, the conservatory itself has a brick wall on the right and the foundation and everything has been built, in my mind it would just be a case of building two walls and adding french/bi folding doors and installing the kitchen.
    Originally posted by sl_jones
    You'd need a roof as well , and the walls would need foundations as they are unlikely to have put in foundations that can support the wall thickness and weight required for a proper extension when building the conservatory (as why would they?). And the floor may need replacing so it is insulated to building regs. So you're basically starting from scratch...
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
    Home is where my books are.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 19th Jun 17, 2:41 PM
    • 23,580 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 19th Jun 17, 2:41 PM
    • #5
    • 19th Jun 17, 2:41 PM
    There's nothing to convert. The wall appears to belong to your neighbour. You need a party wall agreement and an award to your neighbour for half the cost of the wall.

    The rest of it is just glass. The whole thing beeds to come out because none of it is usable as part of an extension.

    So that leaves you needing to build an extension.

    The other thing I see is what appears to be an inspection chamber cover inside the conservatory. That would not comply with building regs. If it is private to that dwelling then it either needs blocking up and suitable rodding access provided at best, or ir needs moving outside the footprint of the house.

    If it is shared then a build over agreement is required (Thames Water in Westerham?) and that will probably involve moving it all.

    Certainly not £25k for the build. It would be considerably more. £40k would be a sensible ballpark to start with, and then the kitchen on top.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 19th Jun 17, 6:38 PM
    • 22,925 Posts
    • 88,082 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 19th Jun 17, 6:38 PM
    • #6
    • 19th Jun 17, 6:38 PM
    At least if there's nothing substantial there as a foundation, you'll have less to dispose of. A standard conservatory dwarf wall would only have around 450mm under it, which would be inadequate and need complete removal.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Sedge123
    • By Sedge123 19th Jun 17, 10:31 PM
    • 527 Posts
    • 1,023 Thanks
    Sedge123
    • #7
    • 19th Jun 17, 10:31 PM
    • #7
    • 19th Jun 17, 10:31 PM
    We are doing exactly this. Conservatory built (badly) on concrete slab, whole thing will he knocked town and proper foundations built, already have build over agreement sorted. Doing it ourselves so not able to comment on price.
    Determined to save and not squander!
    On a mission to save money whilst renovating our new forever home
    • sl_jones
    • By sl_jones 22nd Jun 17, 1:12 PM
    • 53 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    sl_jones
    • #8
    • 22nd Jun 17, 1:12 PM
    • #8
    • 22nd Jun 17, 1:12 PM
    Hi all,

    I've viewed the property again and put in an offer. Just an updated, the wall on the neighbour's side is not attached to them and there is about a 1 foot gap between the two properties.

    The conservatory itself is on a brick foundation as it is about 2/3 feet from the floor, this is covered up by the decking. It's not like you step out of the conservatory and go straight onto the grass, the decking acts as a step down to the actually garden.

    The conservatory itself measure around 20.5 sq2.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 22nd Jun 17, 1:48 PM
    • 23,580 Posts
    • 65,740 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 22nd Jun 17, 1:48 PM
    • #9
    • 22nd Jun 17, 1:48 PM
    Doesn't matter. Conservatories are exempt from building regulations. That means they don't need to comply and that is the reason they are cheaper than extensions.

    Foundations are not made of brick, they are concrete. They need to be a minimum depth to hit solid ground and prevent movement. Conservatory suppliers save money by not putting it sufficient foundations.

    If that conservatory has foundations suitable for an extension I will be very, very surpised. Get out with a spade, and see how deep they are!

    Good news that you don't have to pay the neighbours for the wall.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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