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  • FIRST POST
    • mchardmanuk
    • By mchardmanuk 18th Jun 17, 3:05 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 2Thanks
    mchardmanuk
    Invoice for Work I Have No Idea About
    • #1
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:05 PM
    Invoice for Work I Have No Idea About 18th Jun 17 at 3:05 PM
    Sorry if this is in the wrong place (please move if it is) I couldn't work out where to put it.

    I receviced a letter from a company with an invoice for some work.

    The letter is addressed to corporate assets (what does that mean?)
    The address on the letter doe snot have my name or even my full address, it is missing the last part of the postcode, the road name is two words and not one and there is no mention of the flat name.

    I have no idea why I have received the letter and would like to know what to do as there is a large sum of money being asked for that has nothing to do with me. The work is for some sort of industrial machinery, which have nothing t do with my job.

    Should I ring the company as I've googled them and everything matches up.
Page 1
    • Twopints
    • By Twopints 18th Jun 17, 3:14 PM
    • 1,348 Posts
    • 1,815 Thanks
    Twopints
    • #2
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:14 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:14 PM
    Do you have a shredder? If not, a waste paper basket will do.
    Not even wrong
    • angryparcel
    • By angryparcel 18th Jun 17, 3:29 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    angryparcel
    • #3
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:29 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:29 PM

    Should I ring the company as I've googled them and everything matches up.
    Originally posted by mchardmanuk
    NO dont ring them, just bin the letter and if you get any more do not open them and just write 'return to sender' on the front and place back in post box
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 18th Jun 17, 3:48 PM
    • 1,780 Posts
    • 887 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    • #4
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:48 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:48 PM
    Agree with don't ring them but disagree with advice to shred/bin it. Just write "Not Known at This Address - Return to Sender" on it and slip it in the post box.
    • naedanger
    • By naedanger 18th Jun 17, 3:49 PM
    • 2,146 Posts
    • 1,736 Thanks
    naedanger
    • #5
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:49 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:49 PM
    Should I ring the company as I've googled them and everything matches up.
    Originally posted by mchardmanuk
    You are not obliged to call them or help them.

    But personally I would call them to explain that they have made a mistake, in the hope that they can sort out what has happened and avoid contacting you again.

    However if they start making any demands then I would end the call. [Obviously if they try to demand you pay the amount state that you dispute that you owe them anything. Then demand they stop any further contact other than formal legal action.]
    • angryparcel
    • By angryparcel 18th Jun 17, 3:51 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    angryparcel
    • #6
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:51 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:51 PM
    Agree with don't ring them but disagree with advice to shred/bin it. Just write "Not Known at This Address - Return to Sender" on it and slip it in the post box.
    Originally posted by Le_Kirk
    But reading what the OP has written, i assume they have opened, so too late to return to sender
    • angryparcel
    • By angryparcel 18th Jun 17, 3:58 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    angryparcel
    • #7
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:58 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Jun 17, 3:58 PM
    You are not obliged to call them or help them.

    But personally I would call them to explain that they have made a mistake, in the hope that they can sort out what has happened and avoid contacting you again.

    However if they start making any demands then I would end the call. [Obviously if they try to demand you pay the amount state that you dispute that you owe them anything. Then demand they stop any further contact other than formal legal action.]
    Originally posted by naedanger
    calling them means you would have had to open the letter, so admitting the details on the envelope are correct
    • naedanger
    • By naedanger 18th Jun 17, 4:04 PM
    • 2,146 Posts
    • 1,736 Thanks
    naedanger
    • #8
    • 18th Jun 17, 4:04 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Jun 17, 4:04 PM
    calling them means you would have had to open the letter, so admitting the details on the envelope are correct
    Originally posted by angryparcel
    The op opened the letter but that does not mean they have admitted the details on the envelope were correct. My understanding is that they don't know anything about "corporate assets".
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 18th Jun 17, 4:10 PM
    • 27,596 Posts
    • 70,073 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #9
    • 18th Jun 17, 4:10 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Jun 17, 4:10 PM
    Sorry if this is in the wrong place (please move if it is) I couldn't work out where to put it.

    I receviced a letter from a company with an invoice for some work.

    The letter is addressed to corporate assets (what does that mean?)
    The address on the letter doe snot have my name or even my full address, it is missing the last part of the postcode, the road name is two words and not one and there is no mention of the flat name.

    I have no idea why I have received the letter and would like to know what to do as there is a large sum of money being asked for that has nothing to do with me. The work is for some sort of industrial machinery, which have nothing t do with my job.

    Should I ring the company as I've googled them and everything matches up.
    Originally posted by mchardmanuk
    It's a scam - don't get sucked in.
    • angryparcel
    • By angryparcel 18th Jun 17, 4:44 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    angryparcel
    The op opened the letter but that does not mean they have admitted the details on the envelope were correct. My understanding is that they don't know anything about "corporate assets".
    Originally posted by naedanger
    If it was not addressed to them then they should not have opened it, so as its open it cannot be returned to sender.
    • seashore22
    • By seashore22 18th Jun 17, 5:06 PM
    • 436 Posts
    • 720 Thanks
    seashore22
    It wasn't addressed to anyone else either, from what I can tell. It had the op's part address and no name, so the op was probably entitled to open the letter and see what it was all about. No one is going to take him to court for this.

    I would reseal the letter and return to sender.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 18th Jun 17, 5:10 PM
    • 10,833 Posts
    • 8,076 Thanks
    unholyangel
    calling them means you would have had to open the letter, so admitting the details on the envelope are correct
    Originally posted by angryparcel
    How does opening the letters admit the details were correct? All it proves is that the letter was opened, not that they were opened by the intended recipient.

    Its not illegal to open someone elses mail (providing you aren't doing so with malicious intentions).
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
    • angryparcel
    • By angryparcel 18th Jun 17, 6:28 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    angryparcel
    How does opening the letters admit the details were correct? All it proves is that the letter was opened, not that they were opened by the intended recipient.

    Its not illegal to open someone elses mail (providing you aren't doing so with malicious intentions).
    Originally posted by unholyangel
    you need to read the Postal Services Act 2000

    According to the Postal Services Act 2000, it is illegal to open mail that is not addressed to you, unless you can show reasonable excuse. I don't think that as it had someone else's name on it, it could deemed as reasonable excuse.
    • naedanger
    • By naedanger 18th Jun 17, 6:34 PM
    • 2,146 Posts
    • 1,736 Thanks
    naedanger
    you need to read the Postal Services Act 2000
    Originally posted by angryparcel
    The Postal Services Act 2000 says:

    A person commits an offence if, intending to act to a personís detriment and without reasonable excuse, he opens a postal packet which he knows or reasonably suspects has been incorrectly delivered to him.

    Unless the person intended to act to a person's detriment they have not committed an offence.
    • paddyrg
    • By paddyrg 18th Jun 17, 6:34 PM
    • 12,954 Posts
    • 11,030 Thanks
    paddyrg
    "Opened in error" - I know I have when an envelope came through the door in a pile of other stuff.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 18th Jun 17, 6:36 PM
    • 27,596 Posts
    • 70,073 Thanks
    Mojisola
    you need to read the Postal Services Act 2000
    Originally posted by angryparcel
    "A person commits an offence if, intending to act to a personís detriment and without reasonable excuse, he opens a postal packet which he knows or reasonably suspects has been incorrectly delivered to him."
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 18th Jun 17, 7:09 PM
    • 3,701 Posts
    • 4,051 Thanks
    robatwork
    As you said - it's "nothing to do with me".

    For peace of mind you could photocopy it, then seal it back into the envelope with "not known at this address" or similar and stick it in a postbox.
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 18th Jun 17, 7:40 PM
    • 224 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    You could ask the police if they are interested in a fraud, probably not.
    Malicious Communications Act maybe ?
    The police at the sender's end might be more interested.

    You could then write to the sender, telling them that someone is trying to perpetrate a fraud, using their details ; and you apologise in advance for any inconvenience caused by the police as they trace the culprit.

    Best advice is the shredder. The scammer has already stolen your time and your peace of mind. If you contact them, they will know more about you.
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 19th Jun 17, 3:38 PM
    • 2,419 Posts
    • 2,437 Thanks
    DoaM
    you need to read the Postal Services Act 2000
    Originally posted by angryparcel
    Given the subsequent posts, it appears that they have but you haven't.

    I've previously seen that comment you posted but I can't remember where from. It looks like it came from (misguided) guidance motes.
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • wealdroam
    • By wealdroam 19th Jun 17, 4:09 PM
    • 18,359 Posts
    • 15,239 Thanks
    wealdroam
    you need to read the Postal Services Act 2000
    According to the Postal Services Act 2000, it is illegal to open mail that is not addressed to you, unless you can show reasonable excuse. I don't think that as it had someone else's name on it, it could deemed as reasonable excuse.
    Originally posted by angryparcel
    Given the subsequent posts, it appears that they have but you haven't.

    I've previously seen that comment you posted but I can't remember where from. It looks like it came from (misguided) guidance motes.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    Yes DoaM, that exact same text was used by Flyboy152, remember him?, in 2011.
    See here.
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