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    • Things.Past
    • By Things.Past 17th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    • 38Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Things.Past
    Renting with situation
    • #1
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    Renting with situation 17th Jun 17 at 1:13 PM
    My son has recently rented a property via a housing association. He lives there with his partner and now new born baby.


    They have now been confronted with two bees nests (not honey bees). Both at the front of the property, one to the left and one to the right. Entering the house is a bit of a duck and dive and even harder getting the new born in as well... They cannot open either front windows as the nests are just above both front windows.


    I feel they are in a dangerous situation and would ask the question who is responsible for the removal of these nests..
    Any advice please..
    Last edited by Things.Past; 17-06-2017 at 9:15 PM.
Page 2
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 17th Jun 17, 8:14 PM
    • 15,705 Posts
    • 39,315 Thanks
    FBaby
    My local councils don't touch bees, only wasps. Wasps come under pest control, bees don't. My council would charge.
    That's interesting. They didn't go into detail of what they would do with the bees Dave, they just said that because they are protected, they get involved when there is a report of a bee nest.

    They said they don't deal with wasp because as stated above, it's a matter of pest control and therefore for occupants to pay for the matter to be dealt with. They didn't even arrange, just gave names of who to call!
    • Things.Past
    • By Things.Past 17th Jun 17, 8:21 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Things.Past
    talk about unnecessary use of sensationalist language

    if they are not honey bees (how do you know?) why is it a "dangerous situation"?

    if it is so "dangerous" why is your son not dealing with the situation himself as a matter of urgency? Just because he rents does not mean everything in his life is the responsibility of other people.
    Originally posted by 00ec25

    sensationalist language , what the hell is that supposed to mean. I have walked this earth enough years to know Bubble Bees from Honey bees. Of course its dangerous if one has to duck to get into ones door / home. It only takes one to start off then the swam attacks, I know because I have had it happen. Tampering would not be a good move by my son, as everything it would take a person with plenty of experience to remove the nest.
    God I asked for advice, now a lecture.
    • Things.Past
    • By Things.Past 17th Jun 17, 8:26 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Things.Past
    Dangerous?

    Bee serious now...
    Originally posted by marliepanda

    Wake up. I know I have discovered how one bee can attract his little friends. Idiot.
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 17th Jun 17, 8:28 PM
    • 1,360 Posts
    • 4,110 Thanks
    Penitent
    Bees die if they sting, so they will only do so if threatened. Don't wave your arms at them. Leave them alone and they'll do likewise. They are not suicidal!
    Originally posted by G_M
    Honey bees die if they sting, but the OP said it wasn't honey bees. Bumblebees have smooth stingers and can sting as many times as they like.
    Last edited by Penitent; 17-06-2017 at 8:30 PM.
    • Things.Past
    • By Things.Past 17th Jun 17, 8:28 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Things.Past
    I thought that the local council removed bees nest (but not wasps). At least that's what my local council told me because of bees being protected.

    Surely your son can make a few phone calls, or is it a case that expects anyone else to deal with his problem?
    Originally posted by FBaby



    Another idiotic answer, How do you know my sons health issues, You are assuming he has a phone, not everyone follows the crowd....I am asking for some constructive advice but people like you have no idea, go play on your play station fed up with people like you.
    • Things.Past
    • By Things.Past 17th Jun 17, 8:32 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Things.Past
    We have a bees nest in the porch, and have had for the last 5 years. We also have a baby (he was a young baby last year).

    We haven't done anything about it and have had no issues. They occasionally get in to the house but if they do, we just help them back out. We can't have the front windows open more than a crack, but honestly, how frequently do the windows need to be wide open?

    We've never been stung or bothered by them. They are sorely needed for the preservation of the planet!
    Originally posted by Rambosmum

    Thatys clever, wait till they sting then do something about the situation, bit like letting your child play with a Bull Terrier, wait till it does damage then act.. So these few bees are going to save the planet, think its down to the human race to do that..HAHAHA.
    • societys child
    • By societys child 17th Jun 17, 8:48 PM
    • 4,402 Posts
    • 4,641 Thanks
    societys child
    Thatys clever, wait till they sting then do something about the situation, bit like letting your child play with a Bull Terrier, wait till it does damage then act.. So these few bees are going to save the planet, think its down to the human race to do that..HAHAHA.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    For goodness sake . . . had two bees nests in the loft, every other year, for as long as I can remember. They don't bother us, we don't bother them.
    Tell your son to grow some . . .

    I feel they are in a dangerous situation and would ask the question who is responsible for the removal of these nests..
    Your son . . .

    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th Jun 17, 9:43 PM
    • 1,509 Posts
    • 4,054 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    So... this is a troll, I presume? Odd choice of subject!
    • Fosterdog
    • By Fosterdog 17th Jun 17, 9:46 PM
    • 3,049 Posts
    • 5,291 Thanks
    Fosterdog
    Another idiotic answer, How do you know my sons health issues, You are assuming he has a phone, not everyone follows the crowd....I am asking for some constructive advice but people like you have no idea, go play on your play station fed up with people like you.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    If your sons health issues are not severe enough to stop him from procreating then how are they severe enough to stop him making a call or two? What about his partner? Is she also as incapable as him? What about you? Are you as incapable of making a few calls as those two are? That's all FBaby was suggesting is making a phone call or two and that gets you riled up enough to be "fed up of people like you" and sling insults and a longstanding, respected and helpful member and yet you are asking for constructive advice, that is very constructive advice.

    You have been given advice on a few different avenues to follow to potentially get the nests removed, what more do you want? Someone from here to come and do it for you?
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 17th Jun 17, 10:34 PM
    • 27,973 Posts
    • 71,121 Thanks
    Mojisola
    I have walked this earth enough years to know Bubble Bees from Honey bees. Of course its dangerous if one has to duck to get into ones door / home. It only takes one to start off then the swam attacks, I know because I have had it happen.

    Tampering would not be a good move by my son, as everything it would take a person with plenty of experience to remove the nest.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    I've never heard of bumble bees attacking en masse.

    A honeybee swarm can be boxed and rehomed but that's because they've left the hive and are actively looking for a new home. You can't move a bumble bee nest in the same way.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 17th Jun 17, 10:40 PM
    • 1,778 Posts
    • 2,626 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Don't spray them with water as that antagonises them
    Originally posted by gettingtheresometime
    It antagonises most people, to be fair. You should probably post this on every "neighbour dispute" thread.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Jun 17, 11:08 PM
    • 22,887 Posts
    • 88,011 Thanks
    Davesnave
    So... this is a troll, I presume? Odd choice of subject!
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    I think they're genuine; just a bit out of step with the natural world and unwilling to consider that they may be overreacting through a lack of knowledge.

    As I see it, the son simply has 2 choices:

    co-exist with the bees

    or

    pay someone to spray chemical insectcide into the walls of the house

    When I was a kid, my primary school had a beekeeping team. Somewhere, I still have a dog-eared photo of us proudly displaying the cup we won. Yes, we were all stung; some more than others, but that wasn't enough to dissuade us from being in a group that had special dispensation to down tools every time a swarm was reported in our area.

    We never handled the swarms; that was definitely the Head's job to get them into a box!
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 17th Jun 17, 11:21 PM
    • 4,533 Posts
    • 3,913 Thanks
    00ec25
    sensationalist language , what the hell is that supposed to mean..
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    I note you have now removed the word dangerous from the title of this thread. Thank you as your over dramatisation was poorly timed, please consider this: the only "dangerous" situation your son is in is his bank balance may have a hit for a pest control bill, compare that to those in the news, theirs was the dangerous situation when renting (RIP)

    I have walked this earth enough years to know Bubble Bees from Honey bees. Of course its dangerous if one has to duck to get into ones door / home. It only takes one to start off then the swam attacks, I know because I have had it happen. Tampering would not be a good move by my son, as everything it would take a person with plenty of experience to remove the nest.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    Bumble bees don't swarm...but then as you know what they are you presumably also know...

    "Bumblebees don't form swarms like honeybees do. But you might see a few bees flying outside a nest, especially if it's in a bird box or somewhere else above ground. These are male bees hovering outside the nest, waiting for queens to emerge so that they can mate. Male bumblebees cannot sting, and they pose no risk to you at all. Therefore, no action is needed to be taken for them."
    https://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-bees/faqs/swarming-bumblebees/
    Last edited by 00ec25; 18-06-2017 at 2:14 AM.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 18th Jun 17, 12:17 AM
    • 1,634 Posts
    • 1,952 Thanks
    EachPenny
    So these few bees are going to save the planet, think its down to the human race to do that..HAHAHA.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    It won't be so funny to your grandchild when there are food shortages due to the lack of pollinators. The human race won't stand much chance of saving the planet when they are either dead from hunger, or dead from fighting over what food resources are left. Hopefully not a situation anyone will need to face, but we can help future generations avoid it by educating them on what is safe and what is genuinely dangerous.

    ...pay someone to spray chemical insectcide into the walls of the house
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Hmmm.... I foresee posts about dangerous insecticides being sprayed around near young children....

    Love the story about primary school beekeeping I think you should find the picture and share it with us. My primary school headteacher was interested in birdwatching and maypole dancing... pictures of me involved in the latter are kept firmly under lock and key
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Jun 17, 1:01 AM
    • 22,887 Posts
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    Davesnave
    s.
    Hmmm.... I foresee posts about dangerous insecticides being sprayed around near young children....
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    That's what I was hinting at. Every action has the potential for risk.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • SnooksNJ
    • By SnooksNJ 18th Jun 17, 8:42 AM
    • 658 Posts
    • 1,122 Thanks
    SnooksNJ
    Thatys clever, wait till they sting then do something about the situation, bit like letting your child play with a Bull Terrier, wait till it does damage then act.. So these few bees are going to save the planet, think its down to the human race to do that..HAHAHA.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    Yes it is down to the Human Race. Which is why it's important for you to educate yourself on the importance of preserving the ecosystem by not killing beneficial insects, like bee's.
    Last edited by SnooksNJ; 18-06-2017 at 11:05 AM.
    • LuckyG
    • By LuckyG 18th Jun 17, 11:43 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 215 Thanks
    LuckyG
    Thatys clever, wait till they sting then do something about the situation, bit like letting your child play with a Bull Terrier, wait till it does damage then act.. So these few bees are going to save the planet, think its down to the human race to do that..HAHAHA.
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    Now that is a very good example of how uneducated and closed minded you are. If everyone had your sensless beliefs then the planet would be scr*wed.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 18th Jun 17, 12:02 PM
    • 40,519 Posts
    • 46,360 Thanks
    G_M
    Honey bees die if they sting, but the OP said it wasn't honey bees. .
    Originally posted by Penitent
    Yes - OP said it ws 'Bubble Bees'.

    These protect themselves when threatened by forming a protective 'bubble' of lighter-than-air liquid honey around the nest. They then reserve their sting intact till the threat has passed at which point they 'pop' the bubble around the nest.

    If they used their sting to attack, they'd be unable to pop the bubble and the nest would suffocate.
    • Cheeky_Monkey
    • By Cheeky_Monkey 18th Jun 17, 12:23 PM
    • 1,266 Posts
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    Cheeky_Monkey
    OP, you need to get a grip, you're on the verge of being hysterical
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Jun 17, 12:41 PM
    • 22,887 Posts
    • 88,011 Thanks
    Davesnave
    OP, you need to get a grip, you're on the verge of being hysterical
    Originally posted by Cheeky_Monkey
    To be fair, so are some of the people replying.

    Not everyone tunes into Springwatch and Countryfile every week.

    Why, I bet there are people here who've never kept up with the Kardashians, or who think that Kanye West is the man who selects the best pilchards before the rest are rejected....
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
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