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    • Things.Past
    • By Things.Past 17th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    • 34Posts
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    Things.Past
    Renting with situation
    • #1
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    Renting with situation 17th Jun 17 at 1:13 PM
    My son has recently rented a property via a housing association. He lives there with his partner and now new born baby.


    They have now been confronted with two bees nests (not honey bees). Both at the front of the property, one to the left and one to the right. Entering the house is a bit of a duck and dive and even harder getting the new born in as well... They cannot open either front windows as the nests are just above both front windows.


    I feel they are in a dangerous situation and would ask the question who is responsible for the removal of these nests..
    Any advice please..
    Last edited by Things.Past; 17-06-2017 at 9:15 PM.
Page 1
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th Jun 17, 1:15 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #2
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:15 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:15 PM
    They should ring the housing association.

    Bumblebees aren't dangerous though, they rarely sting, the family shouldn't have a problem going in and out as normal.

    Lots of people plant flowers trying to attract bees, they're endangered you know!
    • patman99
    • By patman99 17th Jun 17, 1:19 PM
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    patman99
    • #3
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:19 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:19 PM
    As bees are protected by Law, they may find that the HA will not be able to deal with them. My advice is to contact a local bee keeper as they may well be interested in a free swarm of bees to fill an empty hive.
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    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th Jun 17, 1:30 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #4
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:30 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Jun 17, 1:30 PM
    I've just read something on a bumblebee site that says the bees you see buzzing around the nest are usually male bees, and they can't sting anyway, only the females can.

    Might put their minds at ease.
    • 00ec25
    • By 00ec25 17th Jun 17, 2:03 PM
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    00ec25
    • #5
    • 17th Jun 17, 2:03 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Jun 17, 2:03 PM
    talk about unnecessary use of sensationalist language

    if they are not honey bees (how do you know?) why is it a "dangerous situation"?

    if it is so "dangerous" why is your son not dealing with the situation himself as a matter of urgency? Just because he rents does not mean everything in his life is the responsibility of other people.
    • Glbooth3
    • By Glbooth3 17th Jun 17, 2:39 PM
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    Glbooth3
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 17, 2:39 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 17, 2:39 PM
    We've got a bees nest to back of house. Just above bathroom window, the next house on has too, has been there the past 5 years I've lived her, never see any in the house and I always have windows open, my boys bedroom and bathroom being on the back. Bees rarely sting anyway and plenty of times I've helped a few tired ones with sugar water
    • G_M
    • By G_M 17th Jun 17, 3:09 PM
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    G_M
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 17, 3:09 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 17, 3:09 PM
    I think you get the idea.... basically it is not a dangerous situation, it's a case of paranoia.

    Chill out! If you're that worried

    a) get a piece of muslin and drape it over the pram for a few seconds as you go in/out to prevent bees getting in the pram.

    b) buy some antihistamine cream to keep in the bathroom (or by the door!) for the unlikely event of a sting

    Bees die if they sting, so they will only do so if threatened. Don't wave your arms at them. Leave them alone and they'll do likewise. They are not suicidal!
    • Fosterdog
    • By Fosterdog 17th Jun 17, 4:39 PM
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    Fosterdog
    • #8
    • 17th Jun 17, 4:39 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Jun 17, 4:39 PM
    As bees are protected by Law, they may find that the HA will not be able to deal with them. My advice is to contact a local bee keeper as they may well be interested in a free swarm of bees to fill an empty hive.
    Originally posted by patman99
    Most beekeepers keep honey bees not bumble bees, usually a local beekeeper will help to remove a swarm but they only remove honey bees free for bumble bees they charge as they will not keep the bees just relocate them to a suitable area.

    If they are bumble bees they only stay for a few weeks before they move on.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 17th Jun 17, 5:09 PM
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    EachPenny
    • #9
    • 17th Jun 17, 5:09 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Jun 17, 5:09 PM
    If they are nesting in the wall there is also a possibility they are mason bees.

    If so the OP's son can consider himself even more fortunate that living creatures - with huge value to the environment their grandchild will grow up in - want to share living space with the son's family

    Leave them in peace and they will get on with their own lives. (The bees that is)
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • splishsplash
    • By splishsplash 17th Jun 17, 5:20 PM
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    splishsplash
    Could bee worse....

    I was just reading this article yesterday - seems this is the time of year for it, and they should be gone shortly. I agree with what other posters have said - drape a muslin cloth over baby for now and contact your local beekeepers association for help.
    I walk around like everything is fine, but deep down, inside my shoe, my sock is sliding off.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 17th Jun 17, 5:33 PM
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    marliepanda
    Dangerous?

    Bee serious now...
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    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 17th Jun 17, 5:45 PM
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    FBaby
    I thought that the local council removed bees nest (but not wasps). At least that's what my local council told me because of bees being protected.

    Surely your son can make a few phone calls, or is it a case that expects anyone else to deal with his problem?
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 17th Jun 17, 5:48 PM
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    gettingtheresometime
    Don't spray them with water as that antagonises them
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    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 17th Jun 17, 5:54 PM
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    marliepanda
    I thought that the local council removed bees nest (but not wasps). At least that's what my local council told me because of bees being protected.

    Surely your son can make a few phone calls, or is it a case that expects anyone else to deal with his problem?
    Originally posted by FBaby
    My local councils don't touch bees, only wasps. Wasps come under pest control, bees don't. My council would charge.

    Even if housing association properties the resident would be liable to pay. Housing association doesn't mean they pay for everything for you. My council do pest control discounts for benefit claimants of 50% but you still have to pay. But anyway, my council wouldnt remove bees.

    The national beekeepers association will be of help, but again, with them not being honey bees they will most likely be a charge.

    But the charge will be worth being free of a dangerous situation.
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    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Jun 17, 6:18 PM
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    Davesnave


    I feel they are in a dangerous situation and would ask the question who is responsible for the removal of these nests..
    Any advice please..
    Originally posted by Things.Past
    As you can see from responses, just because you feel they may be in a dangerous situation doesn't mean that others will agree. If the HA don't think it's particularly serious, then it will be down to your son to act.

    If these aren't honey bees, then they are some kind of wild bee which probably won't interest beekeepers much, nor will anyone be able to take them away anyway if they're if they're inside a wall cavity. The only option will be destruction via pesticides, for which someone will likely charge.

    Wild bees are all many of us have left; honey bees having been severely affected by disease, and possibly chemicals too. Without them, and other similar insects, our agriculture would be stuffed.

    These bees aren't aggressive and don't cause any problems on my property, where there are probably several dozen nests, mostly in the ground and hedge banks. I don't expect you to share my enthusiasm for them, but I want you to consider whether your son's worries and your post might represent a slight overreaction to something unfamiliar.
    Working subliminally.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Jun 17, 6:27 PM
    • 22,344 Posts
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    Davesnave
    I thought that the local council removed bees nest (but not wasps). At least that's what my local council told me because of bees being protected.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    How would removing a wild bees nest 'protect' them? Bees can only be successfully relocated if there's a Queen with the swarm, and wild bees in holes, whether in buildings, trees or the ground, are pretty hard to get at.

    It's completely different from trapping a swarm that's not in a settled location.

    I had a badger 'remove' one nest in my orchard the other night. The remaining bees were still buzzing around somewhat forlornly. It was sad, and probably a bit early for useful amounts of honey.
    Working subliminally.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 17th Jun 17, 6:32 PM
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    G_M
    If they are nesting in the wall there is also a possibility they are mason bees.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    In that case they will attack and sting unless you greet them with the appropriate secret antennae/hand-shake......
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 17th Jun 17, 6:33 PM
    • 27,598 Posts
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    Mojisola
    In that case they will attack and sting unless you greet them with the appropriate secret antennae/hand-shake......
    Originally posted by G_M
    ..............
    • Rambosmum
    • By Rambosmum 17th Jun 17, 7:44 PM
    • 1,287 Posts
    • 1,732 Thanks
    Rambosmum
    We have a bees nest in the porch, and have had for the last 5 years. We also have a baby (he was a young baby last year).

    We haven't done anything about it and have had no issues. They occasionally get in to the house but if they do, we just help them back out. We can't have the front windows open more than a crack, but honestly, how frequently do the windows need to be wide open?

    We've never been stung or bothered by them. They are sorely needed for the preservation of the planet!
    • mollycat
    • By mollycat 17th Jun 17, 7:44 PM
    • 913 Posts
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    mollycat
    We have a small nest of wild bees under our kitchen floor most years. Go in and out via the air brick and cause no bother to us at all.

    Also, our choice of plants/flowers aims to attract more bees to our garden.

    Like most, I find your reaction to a completely benign situation a little puzzling.

    Hopefully your family can get used to just walking past and ignoring them.
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