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    • sue_marie
    • By sue_marie 16th Jun 17, 11:56 PM
    • 31Posts
    • 4Thanks
    sue_marie
    Charged for using debit card
    • #1
    • 16th Jun 17, 11:56 PM
    Charged for using debit card 16th Jun 17 at 11:56 PM
    Today I went to York Theatre Royal box office to buy two tickets and was told there was a £1.50 'transaction fee' for all debit and credit cards. I've never been charged for using my debit card before. Is this a new thing?
Page 2
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 19th Jun 17, 3:20 PM
    • 5,297 Posts
    • 5,051 Thanks
    eskbanker
    I think they're wrong to say "If the charge is the same regardless of the card payment method and is imposed as a booking or administration fee, then the amount is not restricted by the regulations".

    If they removed the word 'card' then that would be fair enough as it would be a standard booking fee applied across all payment methods (including cash), but as they're specifically surcharging only for certain payment types they need to comply with the regulations.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 19th Jun 17, 3:53 PM
    • 8,027 Posts
    • 4,789 Thanks
    teddysmum
    You are indirectly charged for using your debit card anyway. It is stated on some supermarket receipts that a portion of the charge goes to the card company (I think they get to buy the goods at a reduced rate,so keep the difference.)


    I do recall in the late 1980s,going to Co-operative travel to book a holiday and being told (to my surprise) that there would be a (4%) surcharge for paying by debit card (only being aware of credit card charges). This worked in my favour,as I went to withdraw cash and on my return found that the holiday offer had improved, giving two free child places instead of just one.
    • sue_marie
    • By sue_marie 19th Jun 17, 4:26 PM
    • 31 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    sue_marie
    If they removed the word 'card' then that would be fair enough as it would be a standard booking fee applied across all payment methods (including cash)
    Originally posted by eskbanker
    That raises a whole different issue - because it would then be impossible to buy a £15 ticket for £15.
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 19th Jun 17, 4:42 PM
    • 5,297 Posts
    • 5,051 Thanks
    eskbanker
    That raises a whole different issue - because it would then be impossible to buy a £15 ticket for £15.
    Originally posted by sue_marie
    I agree that the use of across-the-board booking fees are a different issue (and said so earlier in the thread in the brief surcharge versus booking fee debate) but do believe that such booking fees are both legal and widespread so don't think that there is any obligation for any seller to make tickets available at face value and no more.

    Try buying tickets for a West End theatre show or any other major event without incurring some form of unavoidable booking/admin/transaction fee (independent of card and/or postage charges)!
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 19th Jun 17, 5:07 PM
    • 18,150 Posts
    • 13,849 Thanks
    agrinnall
    That raises a whole different issue - because it would then be impossible to buy a £15 ticket for £15.
    Originally posted by sue_marie
    Some organisations used to get round this issue by making face value tickets available but only if paid for by some obscure method that very few people would have. I suspect that doesn't happen so much these days.
    • eskbanker
    • By eskbanker 19th Jun 17, 5:42 PM
    • 5,297 Posts
    • 5,051 Thanks
    eskbanker
    Some organisations used to get round this issue by making face value tickets available but only if paid for by some obscure method that very few people would have.
    Originally posted by agrinnall
    They probably learned from the undisputed masters of how to bend the rules!

    https://conversation.which.co.uk/travel-leisure/ryanair-cash-passport-ryanair-fees-and-surcharges/
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 19th Jun 17, 7:33 PM
    • 9,604 Posts
    • 6,110 Thanks
    bigadaj
    You are indirectly charged for using your debit card anyway. It is stated on some supermarket receipts that a portion of the charge goes to the card company (I think they get to buy the goods at a reduced rate,so keep the difference.)
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    Not sure where you get that from.

    The major supermarkets had subsidiaries though which the payments were channelled, nothing to do with the card companies/ banks.

    This was undertaken for tax reasons, separating the retail from the financial side of the business.

    Why do you think this allows them (the card companies?) to buy the goods at a reduced rate and keep the difference?
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