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    • marlex
    • By marlex 16th Jun 17, 2:45 PM
    • 8Posts
    • 0Thanks
    marlex
    Buying House with Solar Thermal Panels
    • #1
    • 16th Jun 17, 2:45 PM
    Buying House with Solar Thermal Panels 16th Jun 17 at 2:45 PM
    Hi All

    Looking for a bit of advice. I am buying a house that has got the solar thermal panels already installed but the seller hasn't got any paperwork for them apart from the manual on how to use the system. The system is used only for heating the water.

    My solicitor is telling me that a certificate is required for this installation to make sure it's installed as per MCS (microgeneration certification scheme). Could anyone please tell me if i can go ahead with the purchase without the required paperwork or could the certificate be obtained from a certified installer?

    Also what are the costs associated with having these type of solar panels? - maintenance/cleaning etc..

    Thanks in advance
Page 1
    • DumbMuscle
    • By DumbMuscle 16th Jun 17, 3:14 PM
    • 143 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    DumbMuscle
    • #2
    • 16th Jun 17, 3:14 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Jun 17, 3:14 PM
    It seems that the certificate can be requested from the installer, or if they are no longer certified from MCS (with the installer's details) http://www.microgenerationcertification.org/consumers/important-consumer-information (final dropdown box).

    When was the system installed? If it's before 2009, then it won't have been MCS certified anyway (since the scheme didn't exist!).

    (No comment as to how necessary this is)
    • marlex
    • By marlex 16th Jun 17, 5:05 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    marlex
    • #3
    • 16th Jun 17, 5:05 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Jun 17, 5:05 PM
    It seems that the certificate can be requested from the installer, or if they are no longer certified from MCS (with the installer's details) (final dropdown box).

    When was the system installed? If it's before 2009, then it won't have been MCS certified anyway (since the scheme didn't exist!).

    (No comment as to how necessary this is)
    Originally posted by DumbMuscle

    Thanks for your reply. I have a copy of the transfer from 2009 when a building society has bought the house from Taylor Wimpey so it would have been built in 2009 or 08. I am waiting for my conveyancer to let me know if my lender will approve my mortgage without the certificate .
    • marlex
    • By marlex 16th Jun 17, 5:07 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    marlex
    • #4
    • 16th Jun 17, 5:07 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Jun 17, 5:07 PM
    I don't know as I don't have a clue how these things work or what is required, it's my first purchase and my conveyancer is not helpful at all.
    Last edited by MSE ForumTeam3; 18-06-2017 at 12:46 PM. Reason: Quoting deleted post
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 16th Jun 17, 5:31 PM
    • 2,584 Posts
    • 4,193 Thanks
    Smodlet
    • #5
    • 16th Jun 17, 5:31 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Jun 17, 5:31 PM
    I don't know as I don't have a clue how these things work or what is required, it's my first purchase and my conveyancer is not helpful at all.
    Originally posted by marlex

    Probably because they don't have a clue! Are you sure it is worth the hassle? If your heart is set on this house and no other, I am sure you will find a way to overcome this obstacle. Good luck.
    What is this life, if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?

    Every stew starts with the first onion.

    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 16th Jun 17, 6:56 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 98 Thanks
    ComicGeek
    • #6
    • 16th Jun 17, 6:56 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Jun 17, 6:56 PM
    Just because a solar system doesn't have a MCS certificate it doesn't mean that there are problems with it. And even if it does have a MCS certificate it doesn't mean that there won't be any problems. No legal requirement for any installation to have MCS certification, only that you need it to claim RHI payments, which it sounds like you're not eligible for anyway.

    Sounds stupid if your mortgage lender uses that in any way to determine whether or not they approve the mortgage.
    • marlex
    • By marlex 16th Jun 17, 7:08 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    marlex
    • #7
    • 16th Jun 17, 7:08 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Jun 17, 7:08 PM
    Just because a solar system doesn't have a MCS certificate it doesn't mean that there are problems with it. And even if it does have a MCS certificate it doesn't mean that there won't be any problems. No legal requirement for any installation to have MCS certification, only that you need it to claim RHI payments, which it sounds like you're not eligible for anyway.

    Sounds stupid if your mortgage lender uses that in any way to determine whether or not they approve the mortgage.
    Originally posted by ComicGeek

    Agree with you on the above, thanks. I have worded it wrong, the mortgage has been approved however due to the lack of documentation the solicitor is waiting for the lender to confirm if the mortgage conditions are satisfied so in a way the lender could refuse/reject it I guess...
    • Glover1862
    • By Glover1862 16th Jun 17, 7:38 PM
    • 205 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    Glover1862
    • #8
    • 16th Jun 17, 7:38 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Jun 17, 7:38 PM
    Who owns the panels? they could be rent a roof in which case you have a problem.

    Normally You want the panels to belong to the house and when purchase the house you get the FiT payment and get the generated electric. Sound like a diy installation if its only heating water, you could just remove them
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 16th Jun 17, 7:42 PM
    • 4,985 Posts
    • 2,065 Thanks
    jennifernil
    • #9
    • 16th Jun 17, 7:42 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Jun 17, 7:42 PM
    Hi All

    Looking for a bit of advice. I am buying a house that has got the solar thermal panels already installed but the seller hasn't got any paperwork for them apart from the manual on how to use the system. The system is used only for heating the water.

    My solicitor is telling me that a certificate is required for this installation to make sure it's installed as per MCS (microgeneration certification scheme). Could anyone please tell me if i can go ahead with the purchase without the required paperwork or could the certificate be obtained from a certified installer?

    Also what are the costs associated with having these type of solar panels? - maintenance/cleaning etc..

    Thanks in advance
    Originally posted by marlex
    Your solicitor obviously does not understand the difference between solar water heating panels and PV panels which generate electricity!

    No paperwork required for what you have.
    • marlex
    • By marlex 16th Jun 17, 7:44 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    marlex
    In the fittings and contents form the seller stated that they are owned outright and that the lease of the roof/air space is not applicable.
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 16th Jun 17, 7:45 PM
    • 4,985 Posts
    • 2,065 Thanks
    jennifernil
    Who owns the panels? they could be rent a roof in which case you have a problem.

    Normally You want the panels to belong to the house and when purchase the house you get the FiT payment and get the generated electric. Sound like a diy installation if its only heating water, you could just remove them
    Originally posted by Glover1862
    Why would you remove something which saves you money?

    Rent a roof and FIT are totally irrelevant here.
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 16th Jun 17, 7:45 PM
    • 144 Posts
    • 194 Thanks
    ProDave
    Who owns the panels? they could be rent a roof in which case you have a problem.

    Normally You want the panels to belong to the house and when purchase the house you get the FiT payment and get the generated electric. Sound like a diy installation if its only heating water, you could just remove them
    Originally posted by Glover1862
    These are solar thermal panels that only heat water, not solar PV that generate electricity.

    Even under the RHI scheme, the payments are small, and the "MCS premium" for using a registered installer vs an ordinary plumber may make it not worthwhile signing up for the RHI anyway.
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 16th Jun 17, 8:31 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 98 Thanks
    ComicGeek
    Why would you remove something which saves you money?
    Originally posted by jennifernil

    The annual savings for solar thermal are incredibly small, probably only about £50-£60 for a perfectly running system. If there is a problem with the system and you have to call out someone to fix it, then you may end up with it costing you money.

    And when the system gets to 20-25 years old and needs even more maintenance (or replacement!), then you talking significant amounts. Much better to remove it, or at least turn it off and drain it down, before it starts costing money to run.
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 16th Jun 17, 8:39 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 98 Thanks
    ComicGeek
    Agree with you on the above, thanks. I have worded it wrong, the mortgage has been approved however due to the lack of documentation the solicitor is waiting for the lender to confirm if the mortgage conditions are satisfied so in a way the lender could refuse/reject it I guess...
    Originally posted by marlex
    As long as they realise that it is solar thermal and no issue re 'roof renting' schemes, then I can't see how there would be a problem. It's not even as bad as missing FENSA certificates for windows, it's more on a par with not having the original receipt for a 10 year old washing machine....

    As other posters have said, it sounds more like your solicitor doesn't understand the difference between solar thermal and solar PV. Always worth a quick phone call to them to make sure this isn't the case, never assume anything.
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