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  • FIRST POST
    • Lamy
    • By Lamy 15th Jun 17, 10:03 PM
    • 23Posts
    • 8Thanks
    Lamy
    Estate agent removing all listings from Zoopla then putting them on
    • #1
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:03 PM
    Estate agent removing all listings from Zoopla then putting them on 15th Jun 17 at 10:03 PM
    I noticed today an estate agent has taking their properties off and then putting this back on zoopla so they come back up as just added.
    Obviously this is so they appear more recent but I haven't seen other agents do it before so why would they be doing it?
Page 1
    • MisterP123
    • By MisterP123 15th Jun 17, 10:06 PM
    • 147 Posts
    • 149 Thanks
    MisterP123
    • #2
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:06 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:06 PM
    Maybe so they come up as just added?
    • MisterP123
    • By MisterP123 15th Jun 17, 10:07 PM
    • 147 Posts
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    MisterP123
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:07 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:07 PM
    Which appear at the top of search results........ Incase it wasn't obvious?
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 15th Jun 17, 10:16 PM
    • 282 Posts
    • 161 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:16 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:16 PM
    Maybe there should be a law against it. If "just added" has the innuendo meaning of "it hasn't been sitting around for ages with no interest", that would be misleading.

    E.g. For a shop to offer something as "50% off !" it has to have been offered for sale at the higher price, for a specified time ; else they could put a sign for 30 seconds after opening each morning, saying "All goods are double the marked amount", then claim "Sale 50 % off".

    Have a word with Trading Standards if you feel strongly, they are sometimes waiting for enough complaint ( on misbehaviour collectively ) to trigger a visit.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 15th Jun 17, 10:24 PM
    • 5,279 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:24 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:24 PM
    Example #453 of MSE poster answering their own question:

    why would they be doing it?
    Originally posted by Lamy
    so they come back up as just added.
    Originally posted by Lamy
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 15th Jun 17, 10:28 PM
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    davidmcn
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:28 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:28 PM
    Maybe there should be a law against it. If "just added" has the innuendo meaning of "it hasn't been sitting around for ages with no interest", that would be misleading.

    E.g. For a shop to offer something as "50% off !" it has to have been offered for sale at the higher price, for a specified time ; else they could put a sign for 30 seconds after opening each morning, saying "All goods are double the marked amount", then claim "Sale 50 % off".

    Have a word with Trading Standards if you feel strongly, they are sometimes waiting for enough complaint ( on misbehaviour collectively ) to trigger a visit.
    Originally posted by Geoff1963
    The reduced prices example is a specific regulation though. Other tactics are legal, and I'm not aware of there even being an implied requirement that anyone ought to disclose that a property has been previously marketed.
    • Lamy
    • By Lamy 15th Jun 17, 10:38 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Lamy
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:38 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:38 PM
    Sorry I should have been clearer, why don't all agents do it then?
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 15th Jun 17, 10:53 PM
    • 4,633 Posts
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    eddddy
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:53 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:53 PM
    Sorry I should have been clearer, why don't all agents do it then?
    Originally posted by Lamy
    I guess because some EAs think it helps sell properties, whereas other EAs don't think so.


    For example, you've spotted the 'trick', so perhaps now you will think that EAs who use that 'trick' are not trustworthy, so you might tend to avoid them.

    Some EAs may decide not to use the 'trick' for that reason.
    • Lamy
    • By Lamy 15th Jun 17, 11:00 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Lamy
    • #9
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:00 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:00 PM
    I guess because some EAs think it helps sell properties, whereas other EAs don't think so.


    For example, you've spotted the 'trick', so perhaps now you will think that EAs who use that 'trick' are not trustworthy, so you might tend to avoid them.

    Some EAs may decide not to use the 'trick' for that reason.
    Originally posted by eddddy
    Pretty stupid trick if you ask me because about 10 properties from one agent all come up as listed today when in the last week about 3 properties have been listed in total...
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 16th Jun 17, 6:56 AM
    • 12,539 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    It is a trick - but, unfortunately, a common one.

    One of my little "hobbies" is watching the "unwantable" type houses in this area that hang on the market for literally years having this sort of thing done by EAs. Or, on the other hand, the owner themselves taking them off the market for a few weeks/few months and then placing them back on again.

    Wrong all round - but that's how many EA's function and a few buyers.
    ******************
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 16th Jun 17, 7:56 AM
    • 28,948 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    It is a trick - but, unfortunately, a common one.

    One of my little "hobbies" is watching the "unwantable" type houses in this area that hang on the market for literally years having this sort of thing done by EAs. Or, on the other hand, the owner themselves taking them off the market for a few weeks/few months and then placing them back on again.

    Wrong all round - but that's how many EA's function and a few buyers.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Why is it wrong? I can see it as a way of reviving interest in the property and getting new buyers to notice it. If it is not worth the asking price it won't get that price, no matter how long it has been on the market. And if it's the house you want at a price you want to pay, then why does it matter how long it has been on the market? You might not have been in a position to buy it last week.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    St. Augustine — 'In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.'
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 16th Jun 17, 9:38 AM
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    ReadingTim
    Salesman uses sales tactics shocker....
    • Kayalana99
    • By Kayalana99 16th Jun 17, 9:41 AM
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    Kayalana99
    It might cost them to post a property so many not why all E/A's do it? Plus maybe they just don't need to?

    If someone is taking the time to re-add properties to make them look fresher that says they aren't selling the properties they have.
    People don't know what they want until you show them.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 16th Jun 17, 10:11 AM
    • 12,539 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Why is it wrong? I can see it as a way of reviving interest in the property and getting new buyers to notice it. If it is not worth the asking price it won't get that price, no matter how long it has been on the market. And if it's the house you want at a price you want to pay, then why does it matter how long it has been on the market? You might not have been in a position to buy it last week.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    A house being on the market for quite some time might or might not "mean" something. Quite often though - it does seem to "mean" something. We all know that many houses involve some "compromise" or other and some quite a few.

    But the ones I can think of, for instance, round here that are like this are respectively:

    - was vastly overpriced to start with (divorcing couple both wanting £££) and old-fashioned and needing a lot of maintenance work. The price eventually came down literally years later and it has recently been bought. Looking at the new owners - they don't strike me as the type to be bothered by old-fashioned/etc.

    - one I was hauled around by local EA (when I hadn't indicated any wish to view it and they don't basically do viewings in this area) has loads of problems (quite a few potential boundary disputes/a very troublesome back garden/conveniently located for late-night troublemaking chavs to "have a go"/bang by a river and yes...it has had flooding problems already/probable damp?

    - on a plot of land that looks a bit "precarious" to me and has a variety of access issues

    ...and so it goes on....
    ******************
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 16th Jun 17, 11:36 AM
    • 28,948 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    A house being on the market for quite some time might or might not "mean" something. Quite often though - it does seem to "mean" something. We all know that many houses involve some "compromise" or other and some quite a few.

    But the ones I can think of, for instance, round here that are like this are respectively:

    - was vastly overpriced to start with (divorcing couple both wanting £££) and old-fashioned and needing a lot of maintenance work. The price eventually came down literally years later and it has recently been bought. Looking at the new owners - they don't strike me as the type to be bothered by old-fashioned/etc.

    - one I was hauled around by local EA (when I hadn't indicated any wish to view it and they don't basically do viewings in this area) has loads of problems (quite a few potential boundary disputes/a very troublesome back garden/conveniently located for late-night troublemaking chavs to "have a go"/bang by a river and yes...it has had flooding problems already/probable damp?

    - on a plot of land that looks a bit "precarious" to me and has a variety of access issues

    ...and so it goes on....
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention

    Yes, I agree with all that, but I still don't think it is wrong of the EA to try to sell it, that is their job. It will have those problems no matter how long or short a time it is on the market.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    St. Augustine — 'In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.'
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 17th Jun 17, 12:57 AM
    • 282 Posts
    • 161 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    It is a negotiating tactic to persuade someone that an opportunity is time-limited, so they make a decision without proper consideration. "Just come on the market", suggests you were lucky enough to see this bargain first, and would be foolish to let it go.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 17th Jun 17, 8:58 AM
    • 12,539 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    Yes, I agree with all that, but I still don't think it is wrong of the EA to try to sell it, that is their job. It will have those problems no matter how long or short a time it is on the market.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    But the thing is that the true amount of time that a property has been on the market is a "red flag" to take particular care to check that property is okay and doesnt have some huge hidden problem situation - as one can see that a lot of other would-be buyers havent gone for it and there is a good chance at least one would-be buyer has had a survey on it and found it wasnt worth buying.

    So - one knows to take extra care when checking out the property oneself to see if there are any major problems.

    Even in my current (much slower-moving) area "obviously wantable" houses will go within weeks and one can usually tell from the details which ones they are at the time they first appear on the market. My own had been on the market for a few months at the time I bought it - even that was an indicator that there was more of a problem to it than just the amount of work I could see it needed doing. That few months "wait to be sold" was an indicator (as it turned out in the event) of problem neighbours (pretty much sorted now - but boy weren't they...).

    So - goodness knows what a "few years wait to be sold" indicates sometimes
    ******************
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Jun 17, 9:51 AM
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    Davesnave
    Most people looking seriously to buy will know what's been available for some time and won't be fooled. They'll just note tactics like this, probably see them as desperation measures and give the agent double scrutiny in the future.

    It's the same when a house that's been marketed for ages is photographed from a completely different angle and that's used as a fresh lead photo. People just giggle when they realise and say, "Oh, that old chestnut!"

    It's largely self-defeating, but agents can hardly be blamed for trying to gain maximum exposure for their properties, if the situation allows.
    Working subliminally.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 17th Jun 17, 11:07 AM
    • 12,539 Posts
    • 34,267 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    As you say - "that old chestnut" and I tend to groan at re-marketing and the way photos are taken.

    The house I mentioned earlier that the EA hauled me over to see was clearly a "hope to get a gullible incomer to buy this one" house. The photos looked great and it looked really tempting and I definitely fancied the look of it - but I'd sussed enough about it not to even have put it on my list of properties to view.

    That was the one with umpteen possible boundary disputes, darn awkward back garden, near to "local yobs creating at night" and bang handy to get flooded by the river.
    ******************
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th Jun 17, 1:36 PM
    • 22,374 Posts
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    Davesnave
    The house I mentioned earlier that the EA hauled me over to see was clearly a "hope to get a gullible incomer to buy this one" house.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    We had none of that from the EAs 'over there.' There were a couple like that, but having our own transport, they just gave us the keys, rather than put themselves out.

    In one, we found a spring coming up in the newly decorated kitchen, and at another I was dive-bombed by angry geese and fell into the pond margins. These were not properties we cared to return to for a second look!

    There were also a couple of places where we were met so that we could have their disadvantages highlighted. There were different reasons involved, but sometimes, it can even be 'inconvenient' if someone shows interest in a property....

    'Over here,' a similar thing happened when we checked-out a very badly advertised ag-tied house in a drive-by. The farmer threatened to call the police, saying we were casing the place. We just laughed, as we knew the real reason why the listing was so inept.

    Just occasionally, agents will go out of their way not to sell a house.....at least not to the 'wrong' people!
    Working subliminally.
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