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  • FIRST POST
    • waspston
    • By waspston 15th Jun 17, 11:21 AM
    • 4Posts
    • 2Thanks
    waspston
    New oven
    • #1
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:21 AM
    New oven 15th Jun 17 at 11:21 AM
    I have bought a new house and the oven is faulty. I have Know the old oven doesn't have a 13amp plug on it and is hardwaired into the wall. my Question is the new oven which I am going to get tonight after work does have a 13amp plug, can I just chop the plug off and wire it directly into the wall?
    Last edited by waspston; 15-06-2017 at 12:57 PM.
Page 1
    • vacheron
    • By vacheron 15th Jun 17, 11:41 AM
    • 717 Posts
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    vacheron
    • #2
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:41 AM
    • #2
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:41 AM
    In theory, yes you can. the "wire in the wall" will normally come from a separate circuit rated at 30 or 40 amps.

    I would read the manual on this though to ensure that the cable is adequately protected at the appliance. You may need to replace the whole cable rather than just cutting off the plug as the fuse in the plug also protects the cable which is also only rated to 13A. If this is not protected elsewhere it could pose a fire risk in the event of an appliance fault.
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    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 15th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    • 3,436 Posts
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    onomatopoeia99
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    Hard wiring suggests the circuit is designed for an appliance that draws more current than a 13A socket can supply. Therefore the circuit back to the consumer unit should be up to the job, and you can hard wire the oven directly to it without the possibility of drawing too much current (too much current is a fire risk). That's without seeing the installation and is a guess, of course.

    However, as with any domestic electrical work, if you don't know what you're doing or looking at and need to ask on a forum, you should consult a qualified professional that can check your specific installation to ensure it is safe, rather than undertake the work yourself.
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    • phill99
    • By phill99 15th Jun 17, 12:16 PM
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    phill99
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:16 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:16 PM
    As above. Get someone in!!
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    • MisterP123
    • By MisterP123 15th Jun 17, 9:57 PM
    • 161 Posts
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    MisterP123
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:57 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:57 PM
    Happens all the time. Doesn't make it right.

    If it is a cooker point fed at 32 or even 40A then that there cable you just cut the plug off is essentially a fuse. Fuses burn. Fuses are designed to burn. Cables aren't.

    Get help from somebody who knows what they're doing and can see what they're working with. Offering advice right now would be stupid.
    • MisterP123
    • By MisterP123 15th Jun 17, 10:00 PM
    • 161 Posts
    • 180 Thanks
    MisterP123
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:00 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:00 PM
    And to somebody who posted above about 13A sockets only supplying 13A. I think you'll find they'll happily take over 32A in most circumstances. It's the fuse in the plug that limits them to 13A.
    • dogshome
    • By dogshome 16th Jun 17, 10:05 AM
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    dogshome
    • #7
    • 16th Jun 17, 10:05 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Jun 17, 10:05 AM
    Beware of an oven supplied with a 13Amp plug, it's cooking abilty is likely to be poor.

    Such an oven was supplied as a 'freebie' with a kitchen we ordered from Magnet - Our kitchen fitter expressed surpise at the 13Amp plug, and how right he was, it took 3 hours to roast a medium size chicken - New proper oven bought 3 weeks later
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 16th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    • 11,618 Posts
    • 6,515 Thanks
    Strider590
    • #8
    • 16th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    Beware of an oven supplied with a 13Amp plug, it's cooking abilty is likely to be poor.

    Such an oven was supplied as a 'freebie' with a kitchen we ordered from Magnet - Our kitchen fitter expressed surpise at the 13Amp plug, and how right he was, it took 3 hours to roast a medium size chicken - New proper oven bought 3 weeks later
    Originally posted by dogshome

    My cooker needed a 50Amp supply........... The wiring must be able to cope with every single feature of the cooker being turned on at the same time.

    I dread to think how awful a 13A cooker would be!!
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