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  • FIRST POST
    • Cotta
    • By Cotta 15th Jun 17, 10:37 AM
    • 2,362Posts
    • 959Thanks
    Cotta
    What Financial Lessons are you Learning in 2017?
    • #1
    • 15th Jun 17, 10:37 AM
    What Financial Lessons are you Learning in 2017? 15th Jun 17 at 10:37 AM
    Hi All,

    Probably more specific to your own situations but what have you learnt thus far this year?

    Two key points for me are:

    1. Carry out regular saving each month, treat it as an expense and don't touch the account it's in.

    2. Build your pension - it's never too soon.

    As always I'm interested in others findings.
    Last edited by Cotta; 15-06-2017 at 10:49 AM.
Page 1
    • username12345678
    • By username12345678 15th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    • 73 Posts
    • 31 Thanks
    username12345678
    • #2
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    • #2
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    1. Keep learning about investing - and accept that I may need to pay others to do the job until i'm happy that i'm not going to cost myself multiples of the advisor fees i've saved.

    2. Keep an open mind about the options available - don't close avenues off because they aren't winning on one particular metric.
    • JohnRo
    • By JohnRo 15th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • 2,356 Posts
    • 2,087 Thanks
    JohnRo
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    1. Focus on the long term plan
    2. Take nothing for granted, nothing is permanent
    4. Be adaptable, flexible and prepared for changes
    5. Focus on the long term plan
    'We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.' ― Albert Einstein
    'Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.' ― Aldous Huxley
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 15th Jun 17, 12:02 PM
    • 54,373 Posts
    • 47,192 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:02 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:02 PM
    An unfashionable investment will ultimately become fashionable if the underlying business model is sound and geared for the longer term.
    “ “Bull markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, mature on optimism, and die on euphoria. The time of maximum pessimism is the best time to buy, and the time of maximum optimism is the best time to sell.” Sir John Marks Templeton
    • darkidoe
    • By darkidoe 15th Jun 17, 8:18 PM
    • 793 Posts
    • 892 Thanks
    darkidoe
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 8:18 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 8:18 PM
    Currency fluctuations affect stocks valuations big time especially if invested in global equities. This makes trying to assess how your portfolio is doing very confusing.

    Save 12K in 2017 # 9 £6036.65/15 000 (40.24%)
    Save 12K in 2016 # 8 £19 721.58/12 000 (164.35%) Achieved!
    • melbury
    • By melbury 15th Jun 17, 9:02 PM
    • 9,557 Posts
    • 14,097 Thanks
    melbury
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:02 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:02 PM
    That interest rates are way overdue for an increase.
    Stopped smoking 27/12/2007, but could start again at any time

    • elephantrosie
    • By elephantrosie 15th Jun 17, 9:22 PM
    • 329 Posts
    • 82 Thanks
    elephantrosie
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:22 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:22 PM
    Do not be greedy. Do not be influenced by other investors.
    Getting bored of my 9 to 5 job.
    • Eco Miser
    • By Eco Miser 15th Jun 17, 9:29 PM
    • 2,893 Posts
    • 2,681 Thanks
    Eco Miser
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:29 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 17, 9:29 PM
    Mr Micawber was right.
    Eco Miser
    Saving money for well over half a century
    • bostonerimus
    • By bostonerimus 16th Jun 17, 2:49 PM
    • 511 Posts
    • 250 Thanks
    bostonerimus
    • #9
    • 16th Jun 17, 2:49 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Jun 17, 2:49 PM
    Mr Micawber was right.
    Originally posted by Eco Miser
    Yes indeed. Live Below Your Means, keep investing simple and you will do ok.
    Misanthrope in search of similar for mutual loathing
    • Linton
    • By Linton 16th Jun 17, 3:06 PM
    • 7,976 Posts
    • 7,787 Thanks
    Linton
    After many years focussing on growth I am learning that there is a point in one's life at which wealth preservation becomes a major consideration. Enough is sufficient, more isnt always better.
    • username12345678
    • By username12345678 16th Jun 17, 3:51 PM
    • 73 Posts
    • 31 Thanks
    username12345678
    After many years focussing on growth I am learning that there is a point in one's life at which wealth preservation becomes a major consideration. Enough is sufficient, more isnt always better.
    Originally posted by Linton

    This is a question I've been wrestling with.


    My SIPP is at a point where 3% drawdown will be more than sufficient for my spending. However, i'm not planning to touch it for another 15+ years which then leads me away from aiming to match inflation to taking on slightly more risk mitigated by the 15 years to smooth out shorter term market volatility.


    Historical returns for different asset class mixes are a useful guide but I'm wary of looking in the rear view mirror.
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 16th Jun 17, 4:03 PM
    • 54,373 Posts
    • 47,192 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    Reaching a point of contentment (i.e. financial security) is worth the effort. Thereafter it's just a question of making the most of every day as it arrives. Not worrying about what one doesn't have monetary wise.
    “ “Bull markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, mature on optimism, and die on euphoria. The time of maximum pessimism is the best time to buy, and the time of maximum optimism is the best time to sell.” Sir John Marks Templeton
    • ian-d
    • By ian-d 16th Jun 17, 4:07 PM
    • 367 Posts
    • 87 Thanks
    ian-d
    Money in a cash ISA earning naff all is actually losing money through inflation. Never got my head around that before.

    I've basically learnt everything I have about investing this year...much too late, but better to start now than not at all.
    • RG2015
    • By RG2015 16th Jun 17, 5:54 PM
    • 214 Posts
    • 74 Thanks
    RG2015
    I am a convert to regular savers this year.

    A lump sum can earn 3.24% p.a. using a 5% regular saver along with a 1.15% feeder account (current best buy Kent Reliance)
    • daddy_bro
    • By daddy_bro 16th Jun 17, 7:07 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    daddy_bro
    If you buy and sell shares then ignore everything you read on forums and do your own research. EVERYONE there has a vested interest. Some that the price goes down and some that it goes up but their posts will reflect their position.
    • coyrls
    • By coyrls 16th Jun 17, 7:19 PM
    • 804 Posts
    • 797 Thanks
    coyrls
    Prioritising cost over considerations such as health and safety can and will have tragic consequences.
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 16th Jun 17, 8:40 PM
    • 699 Posts
    • 501 Thanks
    Apodemus
    Same lesson that I should have learned last year - buy the holiday euros BEFORE the country goes to the polls for a June election!
    • Glen Clark
    • By Glen Clark 16th Jun 17, 10:44 PM
    • 3,740 Posts
    • 2,729 Thanks
    Glen Clark
    Biggest driver of equity prices is politics.
    (Which is why fund managers hire politicians instead of academics)
    For society to function well, people generally need to feel that they have a fair chance of success through their ability and efforts. The more entrenched hereditary elites we have, the less likely people are to feel that way
    • bostonerimus
    • By bostonerimus 17th Jun 17, 3:03 AM
    • 511 Posts
    • 250 Thanks
    bostonerimus
    After many years focussing on growth I am learning that there is a point in one's life at which wealth preservation becomes a major consideration. Enough is sufficient, more isnt always better.
    Originally posted by Linton
    I think of it a little differently. Once you have enough you can afford to take lots of risk with the surplus.
    Misanthrope in search of similar for mutual loathing
    • Linton
    • By Linton 17th Jun 17, 7:12 AM
    • 7,976 Posts
    • 7,787 Thanks
    Linton
    I think of it a little differently. Once you have enough you can afford to take lots of risk with the surplus.
    Originally posted by bostonerimus
    For a while, yes. As an intellectual exercise, perhaps. But if the result isn't going to make any real difference to your lifestyle it could become a little pointless. Maybe there are better uses of ones time.

    Neglecting growth completely could be seriously risky in the long term. Elsewhere I have advocated multiple portfolios with separate well defined objectives. This permits the allocation of a specific % of one's pot to wealth preservation and another to uncompromised higher riisk growth.
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