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    • Soccer80
    • By Soccer80 14th Jun 17, 7:10 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Soccer80
    New to investing - need help
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:10 PM
    New to investing - need help 14th Jun 17 at 7:10 PM
    hi,


    I am looking to invest and know what I want to invest in - just not how to actually do it. I have looked at YouInvest and other online platforms, but am not sure exactly how they work. Any info or advice would be great.


    I am looking to invest long-term and plan to put my money into the following:
    UK Total Stock Market Index
    US (or another depending on advice) Total Stock Market Index
    UK Gov. Bond Index


    Different percentages of my investment in each.


    Within the online platforms that I can sign up to, will they be called what I have called them, or are there a variety of names/indexes?


    I am sure that with some responses I will have many more questions.


    Thanks in advance for advice and help.
Page 1
    • BLB53
    • By BLB53 14th Jun 17, 7:23 PM
    • 1,106 Posts
    • 890 Thanks
    BLB53
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:23 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:23 PM
    Within the online platforms that I can sign up to, will they be called what I have called them, or are there a variety of names/indexes?
    You probably need to know who provides the funds you require and then use their search facility to identify the one you want. For example Vanguard offer a UK FTSE All Share index fund so you could use their filter to show Vanguard funds only then click on the one you want and you will be taken to an overview page with a 'buy' button...should be fairly straight forward from there assuming you have opened an account and have transferred your funds in.
    https://www.youinvest.co.uk/market-research/FUND:B3X7QG6
    If you choose index funds you can never outperform the market.
    If you choose managed funds there's a high probability you will underperform index funds.
    • redpete
    • By redpete 15th Jun 17, 12:39 AM
    • 4,116 Posts
    • 3,633 Thanks
    redpete
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:39 AM
    • #3
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:39 AM
    I would suggest having a look at websites for the platforms you are considering and seeing if you can make sense of the range of funds they offer (and the filtering / search facilities they offer to narrow the options). The funds won't be called exactly the same as the words you have used but you should be able to find close matches.
    loose does not rhyme with choose but lose does and is the word you meant to write.
    • bostonerimus
    • By bostonerimus 15th Jun 17, 12:52 AM
    • 857 Posts
    • 433 Thanks
    bostonerimus
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:52 AM
    • #4
    • 15th Jun 17, 12:52 AM
    Don't buy anything until you have educated yourself a bit. There's nothing wrong with the money being safe and sound in a savings account for a few months.

    When you understand the basics of investing open an ISA and invest away. My recommendation would be to use Vanguard because they are inexpensive and don't overcomplicate the process, but there are plenty of other platforms as well. .

    https://www.vanguardinvestor.co.uk/home

    If you want to learn a bit about investing read the boglehead wiki which is based on the investing philosophy of Vanguard's founder, John Bogle. I like any guide that starts off with "Dont' Panic". It's American so bear that in mind when looking at the asset allocation of the portfolios, but the basic principles ca be applied anywhere in the Galaxy. Also the UK has great things like ISAs so make sure you understand the UK environment and apply the basic approach.

    https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Main_Page

    I'd start with one of Vanguard's Life Strategy funds. These will spread your money across the sectors you mention.......and quite a few more too. For example VLS80 is a smorgasbord of these funds

    Security Weight
    Vanguard U.S Equity Index 19.42%
    Vanguard FTSE Developed World ex-U.K Equity Index 19.23%
    Vanguard FTSE U.K. All Share Index Unit Trust 18.37%
    Vanguard Global Bond Index Hedged 14.11%
    Vanguard FTSE Developed Europe ex-U.K Equity Index 6.62%
    Vanguard Emerging Markets Stock Index 5.88%
    Vanguard Japan Stock Index 3.55%
    Vanguard ETFs S&P 500 UCTIS ETF 3.21%
    Vanguard U.K Government Bond Index 2.62%
    Vanguard U.K. Inflation-Linked Gilt Index Gross 1.88%

    Best of Luck.
    Misanthrope in search of similar for mutual loathing
    • badger09
    • By badger09 15th Jun 17, 11:34 AM
    • 5,121 Posts
    • 4,337 Thanks
    badger09
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:34 AM
    • #5
    • 15th Jun 17, 11:34 AM
    hi,


    I am looking to invest and know what I want to invest in - just not how to actually do it. I have looked at YouInvest and other online platforms, but am not sure exactly how they work. Any info or advice would be great.


    I am looking to invest long-term and plan to put my money into the following:
    UK Total Stock Market Index
    US (or another depending on advice) Total Stock Market Index
    UK Gov. Bond Index


    Different percentages of my investment in each.


    Within the online platforms that I can sign up to, will they be called what I have called them, or are there a variety of names/indexes?


    I am sure that with some responses I will have many more questions.


    Thanks in advance for advice and help.
    Originally posted by Soccer80
    Why have you chosen those? What about Europe, Asia, the rest of the world?

    Have a read around this website. Has a bias towards passive investing, but written in easy to understand language for a beginner.

    http://monevator.com/category/investing/passive-investing-investing/
    • Soccer80
    • By Soccer80 17th Jun 17, 10:39 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Soccer80
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 17, 10:39 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 17, 10:39 AM
    Thanks for all the help.


    The Vanguard site is very good and clear so I think I can do what I want from here.


    Part of my 'plan' was to re-balance investments once/twice a year, so I am selling higher buying lower - within my portfolio - does anyone know if the vanguard VLS80, and their other VSL offers, do this? do they change the proportions of the stocks/bonds within the funds yearly/often, or will it stay the same throughout?


    Thanks for the website Badger 09 - looks good. In case anyone was interested, the book I read which got me interested was called Millionaire Teacher - if anyone has read this too, and acted upon its advice it would be great to know what they thought.


    thanks
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 17th Jun 17, 11:08 AM
    • 9,923 Posts
    • 6,341 Thanks
    bigadaj
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 17, 11:08 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 17, 11:08 AM
    Thanks for all the help.


    The Vanguard site is very good and clear so I think I can do what I want from here.


    Part of my 'plan' was to re-balance investments once/twice a year, so I am selling higher buying lower - within my portfolio - does anyone know if the vanguard VLS80, and their other VSL offers, do this? do they change the proportions of the stocks/bonds within the funds yearly/often, or will it stay the same throughout?


    Thanks for the website Badger 09 - looks good. In case anyone was interested, the book I read which got me interested was called Millionaire Teacher - if anyone has read this too, and acted upon its advice it would be great to know what they thought.


    thanks
    Originally posted by Soccer80
    That's the whole point of the vanguard lifestratgey series, they rebalance back to the allocation, saving you soem effort and potentially trading fees.

    So if shares, or bonds, increase relative to each other then the fund automatically sells one and buys the other to get back to the determined allocation.

    No guarantee this is beneficial of course, what goes up doesn't always come down, but the probability is that you will be buying low and selling high, and/ or vice versa, over the long term.
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