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  • FIRST POST
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 13th Jun 17, 9:55 PM
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    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    What type of dismissal is this?
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:55 PM
    What type of dismissal is this? 13th Jun 17 at 9:55 PM
    You arrive to work to start the day, 'given the sack' and then escorted off the building.

    You have an exemplary work record for a youngster, you are one of the few that do overtime without grumble, nothing is to much bother, you have great potential as a future leader, your face fits, you absolutely are the very last person really expected to leave.

    No it's not me, you always think if you can change places with someone, this would be one of them times, just something I'm struggling to understand why.
    Redundancies type of the can't no longer afford you's I always thought tended to happen more in mornings.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
Page 1
    • LilElvis
    • By LilElvis 13th Jun 17, 10:02 PM
    • 3,029 Posts
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    LilElvis
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:02 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:02 PM
    What exactly did your employer say to you and what does any paperwork say?
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 14th Jun 17, 7:03 AM
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    sangie595
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:03 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:03 AM
    You arrive to work to start the day, 'given the sack' and then escorted off the building.

    You have an exemplary work record for a youngster, you are one of the few that do overtime without grumble, nothing is to much bother, you have great potential as a future leader, your face fits, you absolutely are the very last person really expected to leave.

    No it's not me, you always think if you can change places with someone, this would be one of them times, just something I'm struggling to understand why.
    Redundancies type of the can't no longer afford you's I always thought tended to happen more in mornings.
    Originally posted by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    I wasn't aware that redundancies happened more often in the morning. Where did you get that idea from?

    If your face fits, you are seen as having huge potential, and you are the best one at offering up extra time etc., then you aren't dismissed without warning and escorted from the premises. The two things appear to be inconsistent.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 14th Jun 17, 7:07 AM
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    PasturesNew
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:07 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 17, 7:07 AM
    Please don't take this as a rude comment ....

    Maybe you only thought your face fitted - when in fact somebody higher up found you obnoxious/irritating/smug/arrogant?

    It might be that you couldn't see what the others did.

    Are you a quiet/confident/worker/plodder? Or the sort of noisy/over-confident type would might punch the air and Whoop when they thought they'd "won" a telephone disagreement... before updating your Facebook page with a quick "winner's update"?
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 14th Jun 17, 8:09 AM
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    TELLIT01
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:09 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:09 AM
    If all the 'face fits, huge potential' etc it accurate the only logical conclusion is that some major form of misconduct trumped all the good stuff. If the person has been employed for less than 2 years there's nothing they can do apart from politely request an explanation. In reality I suspect the person involved does know exactly why this happened and isn't letting on.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th Jun 17, 8:26 AM
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    getmore4less
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:26 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:26 AM
    If this is not you or someone else not clear?
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 14th Jun 17, 9:46 AM
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 17, 9:46 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 17, 9:46 AM
    If this is not you or someone else not clear?
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    I thought "No it's not me" made that pretty clear.

    Almost certainly there is more to this than the OP knows; no doubt all will become clear in time. As Sangie says, companies don't sack their best workers for no reason and keep on inferior people.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 14th Jun 17, 10:23 AM
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    marliepanda
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 17, 10:23 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 17, 10:23 AM
    I thought "No it's not me" made that pretty clear.

    Almost certainly there is more to this than the OP knows; no doubt all will become clear in time. As Sangie says, companies don't sack their best workers for no reason and keep on inferior people.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    It makes it slightly more clear but the OP doesn't really make it very clear.

    We can't tell him why a 'perfect' employee was sacked.
    Survey Earnings 2017 - £163
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 14th Jun 17, 10:24 AM
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    jobbingmusician
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 17, 10:24 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 17, 10:24 AM
    The key is 'how long had this person been employed by this employer?' If less than 2 years, then there's nothing that can be done except to write asking for a reason and a decent reference. If more than 2 years, the answer to the thread title is 'automatically unfair'. Those with full employment rights are entitled to due process through a fair disciplinary procedure.
    I'm the Board Guide on the Matched Betting; Referrers and Jobseeking & Training boards. I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

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    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 14th Jun 17, 10:25 AM
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    sangie595
    I thought "No it's not me" made that pretty clear.

    Almost certainly there is more to this than the OP knows; no doubt all will become clear in time. As Sangie says, companies don't sack their best workers for no reason and keep on inferior people.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    To be fair, between"I'm posting for a friend" , "this is for my best friends second cousin on her father's side" and "i totally made this up", it's sometimes difficult to know what day it is on this forum, never mind who is asking what!
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 14th Jun 17, 10:32 AM
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    sangie595
    The key is 'how long had this person been employed by this employer?' If less than 2 years, then there's nothing that can be done except to write asking for a reason and a decent reference. If more than 2 years, the answer to the thread title is 'automatically unfair'. Those with full employment rights are entitled to due process through a fair disciplinary procedure.
    Originally posted by jobbingmusician
    "Automatically unfair" assuming the version is factually correct! We don't know anything other than their being escorted from the building - even the dismissal is not 100% clear. Could have been the outcome of a hearing yesterday. Could have been a suspension. Could have been a lot of things. I wouldn't assume anything other than there needing to be a lot more information. And even under two years, there are reasons it might be automatically unfair.

    If the OP is speculating about something that happened at work, then getting on with your own business is best. If a friend or whatever, then they need to post themselves with the correct information.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th Jun 17, 11:02 AM
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    getmore4less
    I thought "No it's not me" made that pretty clear.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    There is an alternative interpretation

    the reverse of a breakup it's not you, it's me.


    ie. it can't be me I am perfect.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 14th Jun 17, 11:09 AM
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    TELLIT01
    "Automatically unfair" assuming the version is factually correct!
    Originally posted by sangie595
    We can only ever provide comment based on the version of events provided. If the person in question had been employed for over 2 years and was simply told they were sacked, without explanation, and marched out the door, then proper process has not been followed.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 14th Jun 17, 12:53 PM
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    We can only ever provide comment based on the version of events provided. If the person in question had been employed for over 2 years and was simply told they were sacked, without explanation, and marched out the door, then proper process has not been followed.
    Originally posted by TELLIT01
    The information provided is not that they were marched out the door without explanation to them, but that they were marched out the door without explanation to the OP. The OP doesn't know if the person in question was given an explanation.
    • soolin
    • By soolin 14th Jun 17, 2:27 PM
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    soolin
    The information provided is not that they were marched out the door without explanation to them, but that they were marched out the door without explanation to the OP. The OP doesn't know if the person in question was given an explanation.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    I agree, it is all speculative. It might even be that the employee has had previous warnings that no one else was aware of due to embarrassment. This is a 'how long is a piece of string' thread.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move posts there. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
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    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 14th Jun 17, 2:56 PM
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    Malthusian
    Exemplary work for a youngster? Great potential as future leader? Only two possible explanations here, 1) they were sacked by a manager who feared their position was under threat 2) someone's husband/wife got jealous of this young paragon and forced their spouse to can him/her to deter any more mooning. I'm fairly confident both of these explanations are rubbish, but the OP has framed a question in such a way that it is impossible to give a sensible answer.

    I always thought that surprise redundancies were done last thing in the evening, so that the newly ex-employee has the opportunity to go to the pub and get drunk. Rather than have all day to sit at home and stew, and maybe return to the office with a sledgehammer while the working day is in full swing.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 14th Jun 17, 4:00 PM
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    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    Would failure to pass 'company probation' be handled in similar fashion?

    Thanks for the insights guys, I just felt gutted for the way I found out (someone just randomly said during my lunch break that they felt they should let me know, I saw TL's 4 hours before this and no one said a word, I'm sure what I said about it got repeated back anyway) but not half as bad was what the young lady must be feeling. The person seemed really good at their job. Suppose it just threw me and would have been easier to handle seeing an internal memo about it on walking in and starting the shift.

    It doesn't make sense, we're even more staff down now. I immediately worried as this was the senior that I went to with my rota problem when team leader above us both didn't put my holiday on rota that time, perhaps that might have had something to do with it, either way I see now should have gone to head of department and spoken up.

    I can't put exact details on here and trying to avoid doing so I think it's best just left here, just not experienced anything so strange.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 14th Jun 17, 4:24 PM
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    For all you know they tried to steal another employee's car. It's almost certainly nothing to do with your rotas. Forget about it. Either you will find out what happened in the course of time or you won't.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 14th Jun 17, 6:10 PM
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    sangie595
    I'm relatively confident that the reason that management didn't ask your opinion, or drop you an email letting you know about it, was because it is none of your business. And the lunch time gossip is something to avoid as well. You really only know about this third hand, which means that you not only don't know what happened, but you also don't know whether the gossip you have heard is correct. For all any of you know, the person had some really bad news and was being escorted out to support her. Whatever happened, surely people can find something better to talk about over lunch without making sure that absolutely everyone has heard their rumours? And, as you astutely observe, no doubt at least one gossip will be more than happy to help you be the next one to be escorted out by repeating your comments.
    • Bigmoney2
    • By Bigmoney2 14th Jun 17, 8:20 PM
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    Bigmoney2
    Its also possible they handed in their notice to work for a competitor, being escorted of the premises can be common practice in some industries in this scenario.
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