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  • FIRST POST
    • szam_
    • By szam_ 13th Jun 17, 5:23 PM
    • 614Posts
    • 568Thanks
    szam_
    Promotion Dilemna
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 17, 5:23 PM
    Promotion Dilemna 13th Jun 17 at 5:23 PM
    Hi all.

    Would be grateful for some advice - bear in mind, I know a lot of this could have been avoided had I taken proper precautions etc. I am also actively seeking new work because I am beyond disbelief at how all this has been handled, not to mention other worrying things.

    So, to keep it as brief as I can, I had an internal promotion around early March, as I was in my initial 6 month probation, I was placed on a 3 month trial for the role, and around 2 months in was told I'd be passing.

    There was an amount verbally agreed that I would be paid between me and my line manager (I know what you're thinking, I should have gotten this in writing) and this was between an 8 and 10k payrise due to the job and it's responsibilities - this is still 15k short of what was being advertised externally; but that doesn't bother me as it fulfils my needs while I get better at the role and gain experience.

    It's now being handled by operations/HR as someone has finally gotten around to trying to sort out a job description.

    The catch? No-one seems to know what the agreed amount is regardless of who I ask. I keep getting "I can't remember the amount agreed".

    The question.

    How do I handle this, if when I get this put in front of me later this week, it isn't even close to what was verbally agreed? For example, instead of being the 8-10k increase I thought it would be, it only ends up being 3k (which I have a strong suspicion might actually happen and I wouldn't work a job of this responsibility for far, far below the market average).

    My old role isn't really something that exists anymore so turning down anything they offer seems the way to go if I want to lose my job without a new one to go to. I would imagine that accepting and cutting my losses may be the best approach but having this current job on my CV seems to be damaging my prospects of going to back to something similar to previous roles, everything now seems to be a question of "well, you're doing X now, why would you want to go back to doing Y?"

    Can anyone offer any advice, or opinions on how would you handle this kind of scenario?
    XBL: xSzam

Page 1
    • London50
    • By London50 13th Jun 17, 5:57 PM
    • 1,502 Posts
    • 1,421 Thanks
    London50
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 5:57 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 5:57 PM
    Personally I would see what offer they put on the table then if it is below what was stated by your line manager see if you can negotiate to the figure that was discussed with him/her.
    The choice is then yours either take the offer and carry on or if you are not happy with it take it anyway but look for the same job with another company paying a wage you are happy with and move on.
    If the new employer queried why you want to leave your old job just be truthful.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 13th Jun 17, 6:23 PM
    • 3,536 Posts
    • 5,844 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 6:23 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 6:23 PM
    I'd be better prepared than waiting to see what the offer is. I'd be getting evidence of what their competitors pay for this kind of role. Then I'd be telling them what my minimum starting point is - the latter obviously being much less than the evidence you have put in front of them, and higher than £10k - just for the hell of it! If they are better negotiators than you, you'll come out with less than you wanted, but more than you are expecting. If toy are the better negotiator you might end up a lot better off.

    If this role is that critical and you are that good at it, then you should be better at selling yourself. Why would you expect them to respect you if you don't respect yourself. You're either worth it or not.
    • KiKi
    • By KiKi 13th Jun 17, 7:38 PM
    • 4,904 Posts
    • 7,965 Thanks
    KiKi
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 7:38 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 7:38 PM
    I suspect your manager agreed this, then someone from HR decided it was too much of a pay jump (sigh), and now everyone's backing out.

    If this salary is way below market average, and if you don't do the job for it anyway, then stick to your guns. Say you expected £10k as agreed with your manager, which is still lower than market rate. Do it nicely, politely, not in a threatening or angry way. You'll probably find that they'd rather pay you than have the hassle of recruiting again, esp if they can't get someone in the job for your current salary. Show them what their competitors are paying, and if you find out the Hay salary ranges for that type of role, even better.

    I assume you work for a larger organisation from some of the things you say. If so, you could ask to see the new JD, and the job evaluation banding (most companies use Hay for job evaluation to determine the salary range), as this will give you a clue as to whether or not they are paying you what it's worth. They might not share the info with you, but ask if you want to. TBH, I'd just state my expectations in a friendly way first and if they don't agree, say something along the lines of "I'm afraid that won't be acceptable given market rates, but thank you for the opportunity" and work your notice.

    That is, of course, assuming that you're definitely not going to work at the lower rate...!
    ' <-- See that? It's called an apostrophe. It does not mean "hey, look out, here comes an S".
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Jun 17, 8:06 PM
    • 29,452 Posts
    • 17,605 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 8:06 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 8:06 PM
    Line manager might have overstepped their level of responsibility/authority.

    pushing that issue may not be beneficial for anyone just have them marked in your head(trust issues),

    make your case for the rate you think you are worth.

    if they won't go for it you could.

    call their bluff, resign.

    Try to get some commitment to short tern performance related rises.


    Take the role get the experience and walk as soon as the better job comes up.

    Companies that have a culture of being tight can be hard work.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Jun 17, 8:11 PM
    • 29,452 Posts
    • 17,605 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 8:11 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 8:11 PM
    Had you really been there less than 6 months?

    Seems a bit convenient you come in at a low grade get promoted quickly but no pay rise and the job they got you in for kind of no longer exists.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 13th Jun 17, 10:20 PM
    • 37,516 Posts
    • 33,829 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:20 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:20 PM
    The catch? No-one seems to know what the agreed amount is regardless of who I ask. I keep getting "I can't remember the amount agreed".
    Originally posted by szam_
    "I can remember that my line managed offered between £8-10K." Keep on like a cracked record ...
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 1 shawl, 2 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure, 1 sock ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, t'other sock (just about to turn the heel!)
    • itchyfeet123
    • By itchyfeet123 14th Jun 17, 8:58 AM
    • 376 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    itchyfeet123
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:58 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:58 AM
    I would make my starting point for negotiations the externally advertised salary. Assuming you meet all the advertised criteria, the onus will be on them to explain why you are worth less than the hypothetical candidate.

    If you don't meet all the advertised criteria, then the 8-10k is probably fair. See what they offer you. If it's less, counter with, say, 12k.

    In both scenarios, you'll need to make a good case about why you are worth the money you're asking for. The fact you've already had a trial and proved yourself is a strong point in your favour. They would much rather the process of promoting you goes smoothly than spend resources recruiting and gambling they'll be able to find someone better than you and taking a risk on an unknown person.
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 14th Jun 17, 9:12 AM
    • 3,416 Posts
    • 6,353 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 17, 9:12 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 17, 9:12 AM
    Whatever you do, please don't 'threaten' that you will leave if you don't like their offer. Companies don't like that - you'd be out of there like a shot !
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th Jun 17, 9:16 AM
    • 29,452 Posts
    • 17,605 Thanks
    getmore4less
    "I can remember that my line managed offered between £8-10K." Keep on like a cracked record ...
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    I did think about that option but it can backfire as it could be putting the line manager in a difficult position.
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