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  • FIRST POST
    • AlisonW
    • By AlisonW 13th Jun 17, 10:58 AM
    • 602Posts
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    AlisonW
    Is this lavender suitable for cooking?
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:58 AM
    Is this lavender suitable for cooking? 13th Jun 17 at 10:58 AM
    I've just bought a new lavender plant 'Royal Blue' with the intention of including it in a lavender hedge. On the pot it has a symbol of a knife and fork with a cross through it, which I take to mean that its not for eating. I hadn't thought to look before purchasing because I thought all lavender was edible.
    Are some varieties of lavender not suitable for culinary use or is this an indication that its probably been sprayed with something nasty? If the latter will it be safe to use next years flowers for culinary purposes?
    Otherwise I will have to plant it where it doesn't get mixed up with edible varieties.
    Thanks : )
Page 1
    • AlexandLauren
    • By AlexandLauren 13th Jun 17, 11:03 AM
    • 70 Posts
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    AlexandLauren
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:03 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:03 AM
    I thought all lavendar is fine to use in cooking. Are you able to call or speak to someone where you bought it to find out why it has that symbol on it?
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 13th Jun 17, 11:58 AM
    • 1,394 Posts
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    Silvertabby
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:58 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:58 AM
    If you bought this as a garden plant rather than as a specific culinary herb, then it may have been sprayed with some sort of anti-fungicide.

    Alternatively, as a surprising number of common-or-garden plants ARE toxic, the breeders may just be covering their sixes by putting the 'not edible' warning on all of their plants.
    • Cupcake Returns
    • By Cupcake Returns 13th Jun 17, 12:21 PM
    • 81 Posts
    • 258 Thanks
    Cupcake Returns
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 12:21 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 12:21 PM
    It's edible, just not this season as it will have been treated with pesticides Once planted out and has had a growing season it will be fine to eat. Lavender plants grown specifically for culinary purposes aren't treated with dangerous to humans pesticides which makes them more expensive to buy
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 13th Jun 17, 7:29 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 7:29 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 7:29 PM
    All lavenders are edible, but some have a greater concentration of the camphor-type oils, so wouldn't be as tasty.

    If you've got a 'normal' Augustifolia, it's fine after the next year when the chemical spray isn't on the plant. Think the intermediate ones (Lavandins) are used sparingly in Herbes de Provence mixes, but the butterfly (Stoecha) types and the toothed type (dentata? I don't usually bother much with Latin) aren't going to give you the results you want.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • AlisonW
    • By AlisonW 13th Jun 17, 7:47 PM
    • 602 Posts
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    AlisonW
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 7:47 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 7:47 PM
    Thanks for all the replies above. The lavender hedge is for a border on our new allotment. I think I'll stick the new plant somewhere in the garden (maybe try and take some cutting from it) and make sure I check any future ones before I buy.

    Jojo, that's what I suspected, that unsprayed they are all edible, just some less palatable than others.
    Thanks
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 14th Jun 17, 8:45 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:45 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 17, 8:45 PM
    Thanks for all the replies above. The lavender hedge is for a border on our new allotment. I think I'll stick the new plant somewhere in the garden (maybe try and take some cutting from it) and make sure I check any future ones before I buy.

    Jojo, that's what I suspected, that unsprayed they are all edible, just some less palatable than others.
    Thanks
    Originally posted by AlisonW
    From experience, wait until the flowers have started to fade and you can see fresh growth on the non flowering bits.

    You could follow all the rules on taking cuttings to the letter, or you could, if you've got the plants already growing in about 99.5% pure builders' sand 0.3% gravel and 0.2% old compost, surrounded by block paving facing Southeast and therefore in full sun almost all the time until mid afternoon, which is;


    Lop the shoots off,
    nip off the lower leaves with your nails,
    poke 'em in the sand/gravel mix,
    water once,
    go indoors for a cuppa and forget all about them for the next year.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • AlisonW
    • By AlisonW 14th Jun 17, 9:40 PM
    • 602 Posts
    • 314 Thanks
    AlisonW
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 17, 9:40 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Jun 17, 9:40 PM
    I like the sound of the second method much better than the first.
    TBH I've never had much success with lavender cuttings. More success splitting them as long as they haven't got too woody or rootbound. I'm begining to think I may have been pampering my lavenders and killing them with kindness, ie. too much water and too rich potting compost.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 14th Jun 17, 11:04 PM
    • 22,775 Posts
    • 87,591 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 17, 11:04 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Jun 17, 11:04 PM
    I like the sound of the second method much better than the first.
    TBH I've never had much success with lavender cuttings. More success splitting them as long as they haven't got too woody or rootbound. I'm begining to think I may have been pampering my lavenders and killing them with kindness, ie. too much water and too rich potting compost.
    Originally posted by AlisonW
    I could never get lavender to grow, every type I tried just keeled over and died, until I had a 'moment' where I saw a friend's holiday snaps from the South of France. 'Hang on, I bet they didn't heft buckets of water over the fields of Provence in medieval times'.

    Outside my front door is block paving on sand, on a great slab of concrete (culverted river underneath meant that there was high risk of flooding). It's in full sun from about 7am until 2pm all year round. And a brick wide gap filled with gravel.

    I hoiked the gravel out, mixed in a tiny bag of organic, peat free compost with it and shoved it back with random plants - the most successful in summer are lavender, honeysuckle, ivy and rosemary, in Spring it's grape hyacinth, narcissus and tulip. I think it's been watered (well, hosed down after the bin men have dropped stuff) perhaps three times in the last year.

    I've literally showered those plants with neglect - the only time I do anything with them is chopping bits off as they try to come in the house.

    The window boxes and tubs are also quite resilient - the most abandoned is full of red geraniums pretty much all year round, the tubs provide more grape hyacinths and random wild flowers (one is coralling mint this year, as mint tea is fantastic), the most cared for least neglected windowbox is lined with a compost bag and gets watered when you can poke it with your finger and it lifts up, and after about 3 evenings of nagging, Himself will finally get around to chucking a watering can or two over it every fortnight or so - that's full of violas and, now the forget-me-nots have finished, some nasturtiums are revving up.


    I'm a lazy gardener - out the back is pretty much woodland/meadow with a few edibles for the same reason.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
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