Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 13th Jun 17, 10:20 AM
    • 5,935Posts
    • 27,871Thanks
    pineapple
    Removing ivy from house wall
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:20 AM
    Removing ivy from house wall 13th Jun 17 at 10:20 AM
    I recently moved to an old stone cottage with a smooth painted render over the external walls. At first I thought the English ivy growing up the front wall was quite cute. Then I realised it was becoming rampant. Plus it was clinging on to the render with a vice like grip. I cut the stems at the base but it continued to look 'live'. So I pulled away the stems and the greenery (without too much damage) but in parts there is is still a tracery of embedded brown tendrils where it used to be. Not sure I will be able to remove completely without damaging the render. Do these need an application of SBK or similar to kill off completely? Or can I just paint over? Cheers.
Page 1
    • 27cool
    • By 27cool 13th Jun 17, 10:58 AM
    • 250 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    27cool
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:58 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:58 AM
    I've just spend several hours removing ivy, both dead and alive. It's an absolute nightmare to get it all off. I don't think that the embedded brown tendrils will ever come out. A stiff brush seems to help a bit. I went down the garden to look and it's ok from a distance. Not helped by the fact that the bricks have an extremely rough texture. I think I am going to have to live with it as it is now.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 13th Jun 17, 11:02 AM
    • 1,042 Posts
    • 1,258 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:02 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:02 AM
    As above, in the house I moved into, once I'd pulled all the ivy off, I used a lot of elbow grease and a wire brush, but even that didn't shift it all. Over time, weather has reduced the amount of material left behind.
    • missile
    • By missile 13th Jun 17, 11:14 AM
    • 8,843 Posts
    • 4,275 Thanks
    missile
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:14 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:14 AM
    I planted a clematis after removing ivy. Looks much nicer and hides the detritus left by the ivy.
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Ride hard or stay home
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 13th Jun 17, 11:46 AM
    • 5,935 Posts
    • 27,871 Thanks
    pineapple
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:46 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 11:46 AM
    Thanks folks. I'm not too bothered about the appearance. The exterior is rough plastered and painted and I can easily mask any blemishes. I am more concerned that the residue might continue to grow and dig into the plaster.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 13th Jun 17, 1:26 PM
    • 1,204 Posts
    • 1,120 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 1:26 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 1:26 PM
    If you cut the stems at ground level, there will be no ongoing growth; Ivy is hardcore, but it's not that hardcore.
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 13th Jun 17, 2:30 PM
    • 5,935 Posts
    • 27,871 Thanks
    pineapple
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 17, 2:30 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 17, 2:30 PM
    If you cut the stems at ground level, there will be no ongoing growth; Ivy is hardcore, but it's not that hardcore.
    Originally posted by Grenage
    Probably I'm worrying unnecessarily then. But someone told me that it was a common mistake to think that cutting the plant at the base would cause it to die off naturally. He said that the remaining plant would try to cling onto life, get moisture from wherever and damage the mortar in the process. So that was when I decided to prise off the stems and leaves. Except there are still some little brown tendrils/suckers (don't know what you call them) embedded in the wall.
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 13th Jun 17, 4:58 PM
    • 7,390 Posts
    • 4,777 Thanks
    Biggles
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 17, 4:58 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 17, 4:58 PM
    But someone told me that it was a common mistake to think that cutting the plant at the base would cause it to die off naturally. He said that the remaining plant would try to cling onto life, get moisture from wherever and damage the mortar in the process.
    Originally posted by pineapple
    No. It will die and cause no further damage. You said it was brown; brown=dead green=alive. Just check each year and cut any new growth.
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 13th Jun 17, 8:29 PM
    • 4,963 Posts
    • 9,655 Thanks
    I have spoken
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 17, 8:29 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 17, 8:29 PM
    Bead blasting
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 13th Jun 17, 10:09 PM
    • 1,063 Posts
    • 667 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    If you just cut ivy, and the ends touch, it will rejoin, so you have to cut out a section. I found the best way was to pull it off while it was still alive, so it was flexible ; once dead, it's just like wood.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Jun 17, 9:12 AM
    • 23,105 Posts
    • 88,426 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Ugly, but best to leave for a long time till it looks brown and then it comes away more easily.

    I can confirm that ivy growing on oaks several hundred years old and thicker than a man's arm at the base don't regenerate once chain-sawed through.

    The lower part should be dug out, or the cut surface painted with SBK brushwood killer.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • JEN22
    • By JEN22 14th Jun 17, 11:35 AM
    • 327 Posts
    • 54 Thanks
    JEN22
    will roundup kill ivy?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Jun 17, 12:17 PM
    • 23,105 Posts
    • 88,426 Thanks
    Davesnave
    will roundup kill ivy?
    Originally posted by JEN22
    Yes, but only with some difficulty, because it has a waxy surface to the leaves. Painting it on in wallpaper paste is one possible idea, or roughing-up the leaves first with something like a few touches from a strimmer is another. New leaves will take up the glyphosate more easily than old too.

    I'm sure others may have different suggestions.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 14th Jun 17, 2:14 PM
    • 5,208 Posts
    • 4,708 Thanks
    thescouselander
    We had a bad ivy problem on our garden fence. First of all I went at it with a strimmer to make lots of cuts in the ivy and then I dropped a shed load of weed killer on it. A couple of weeks later it was sufficiently dead to be removed without too much bother.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 14th Jun 17, 2:28 PM
    • 7,293 Posts
    • 12,082 Thanks
    andrewf75
    I'd be inclined to leave ivy unless really causing problems. I think the advice is that unless the brickwork is in a poor state it won't damage the walls in fact it arguably protects it from the elements and provides extra insulation as well as looking good and being good for wildlife.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Jun 17, 5:49 PM
    • 23,105 Posts
    • 88,426 Thanks
    Davesnave
    I'd be inclined to leave ivy unless really causing problems. I think the advice is that unless the brickwork is in a poor state it won't damage the walls in fact it arguably protects it from the elements and provides extra insulation as well as looking good and being good for wildlife.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    But this is not brick-work; it's render, and it will need painting every 7- 8 years or so.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 15th Jun 17, 11:50 AM
    • 4,526 Posts
    • 19,104 Thanks
    Slinky
    I'd be inclined to leave ivy unless really causing problems. I think the advice is that unless the brickwork is in a poor state it won't damage the walls in fact it arguably protects it from the elements and provides extra insulation as well as looking good and being good for wildlife.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    Depends whether you like your wildlife to be spiders.......
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

3,916Posts Today

8,643Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Shana tova umetuka - a sweet Jewish New Year to all celebrating. I won't be online the rest of t'week, as I take the time to be with family

  • Dear Steve. Please note doing a poll to ask people's opinion does not in itself imply an opinion! https://t.co/UGvWlMURxy

  • Luciana is on the advisory board of @mmhpi (we have MPs from most parties) https://t.co/n99NAxGAAQ

  • Follow Martin