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  • FIRST POST
    • clairesilverspar
    • By clairesilverspar 13th Jun 17, 9:30 AM
    • 41Posts
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    clairesilverspar
    Pushy credit card salesman - rules?
    • #1
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:30 AM
    Pushy credit card salesman - rules? 13th Jun 17 at 9:30 AM
    Hi, hope I'm in the right place.

    There has been a stand in my local shopping centre for some people selling credit cards recently. I've avoided them so far but yesterday they caught a friend off guard and he's the type of person who can't say no.

    He told them repeatedly that he has no income and has no need or desire to sign up for credit. The guy kept telling him that this is how you build up credit and pushed really hard. My friend said he felt intimidated and like he couldn't get away unless he gave them his contact details. I was actually impressed that he got away with just that.

    What are the rules on pushy sales, particularly for something like credit? The guy was repeatedly told this is not something he could afford but kept insisting it was needed, potentially getting my friend in trouble.

    Does anyone know who is the best person to complain to?

    I've advised my friend to ask them to remove his details from their system when they call and to ask for an address to complain to.
Page 1
    • zx81
    • By zx81 13th Jun 17, 9:31 AM
    • 13,182 Posts
    • 13,493 Thanks
    zx81
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:31 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:31 AM
    Complain the company providing the card.

    They will then pick up with the sales company.
    • MEM62
    • By MEM62 13th Jun 17, 9:41 AM
    • 1,331 Posts
    • 953 Thanks
    MEM62
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:41 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:41 AM

    What are the rules on pushy sales, particularly for something like credit?
    Originally posted by clairesilverspar
    The practical rule is simple. Say no and walk away. No such thing as 'can't say no'.
    • oldagetraveller
    • By oldagetraveller 13th Jun 17, 9:58 AM
    • 2,943 Posts
    • 1,450 Thanks
    oldagetraveller
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:58 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Jun 17, 9:58 AM
    "Complain the company providing the card."

    And the shopping centre?
    Did you hear about the politician who had a backside transplant? It rejected him.
    • robber2
    • By robber2 13th Jun 17, 10:09 AM
    • 255 Posts
    • 203 Thanks
    robber2
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:09 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:09 AM
    Push back. You have to learn to be unpleasant to peole like this.
    • Edi81
    • By Edi81 13th Jun 17, 10:41 AM
    • 274 Posts
    • 161 Thanks
    Edi81
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:41 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Jun 17, 10:41 AM
    Was this at an intu shopping centre?

    If so, then it will be MBNA. I would complain to the lm and to their new owner Lloyds Banking Group!

    I hate any sales like that even the people offering to file my nails!
    • PeacefulWaters
    • By PeacefulWaters 13th Jun 17, 1:27 PM
    • 6,851 Posts
    • 8,437 Thanks
    PeacefulWaters
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 17, 1:27 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jun 17, 1:27 PM
    There's a cooling off period if he gets a card he doesn't want.
    • clairesilverspar
    • By clairesilverspar 13th Jun 17, 2:07 PM
    • 41 Posts
    • 44 Thanks
    clairesilverspar
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 17, 2:07 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jun 17, 2:07 PM
    Thanks,
    It wasn't an intu, just my local small town shopping centre next to the market. I have contact details for the management company though - I didn't think of contacting them.
    I'll help my friend write a letter to the credit company.
    I understand that ultimately it is down to him to refuse but this salesperson was very pushy and followed my friend as he tried to walk away. He was giving him advice which I think was incorrect or could have gotten my friend into debt. He repeatedly told the man he had no income and couldn't afford the credit.


    I understand the "no such thing as can't say no", but when you have serious anxiety and someone is pushing something on you and wont take no for an answer it is extremely intimidating. Some would say yes just to get away from him.


    I'm concerned that he was telling my friend things that were incorrect, and offering bad financial advice.
    • meer53
    • By meer53 13th Jun 17, 3:02 PM
    • 8,824 Posts
    • 12,804 Thanks
    meer53
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 17, 3:02 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jun 17, 3:02 PM
    He was giving him advice which I think was incorrect or could have gotten my friend into debt.

    The only person who could get your friend into debt is your friend. No one forces people to spend on credit cards, if he hasn't signed up for one then there's no issue really.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 13th Jun 17, 6:41 PM
    • 18,426 Posts
    • 14,141 Thanks
    agrinnall
    Complain the company providing the card.

    They will then pick up with the sales company.
    Originally posted by zx81
    Or alternatively they'll give the guy a bonus for persistence, after all, it's his job to get people who don't want one to take out a credit card. Anyone who really doesn't want one can either not engage in the first place or simply walk away.
    • zx81
    • By zx81 13th Jun 17, 6:50 PM
    • 13,182 Posts
    • 13,493 Thanks
    zx81
    Or alternatively they'll give the guy a bonus for persistence, after all, it's his job to get people who don't want one to take out a credit card.
    Originally posted by agrinnall
    Not so much these days. The few providers I know who use face to face are very quick to retrain or can sales companies if they feel they're crossing the line.

    Obviously depends on whether a line was crossed or not, but it's an area the FCA are hot on.
    • Missus Hyde
    • By Missus Hyde 13th Jun 17, 7:32 PM
    • 287 Posts
    • 414 Thanks
    Missus Hyde
    I understand that ultimately it is down to him to refuse but this salesperson was very pushy and followed my friend as he tried to walk away. He was giving him advice which I think was incorrect or could have gotten my friend into debt. He repeatedly told the man he had no income and couldn't afford the credit.

    I understand the "no such thing as can't say no", but when you have serious anxiety and someone is pushing something on you and wont take no for an answer it is extremely intimidating. Some would say yes just to get away from him.
    Originally posted by clairesilverspar
    Whereas I can have a certain amount of sympathy for someone who has anxiety problems and finds themselves in a similar position, I find a simple "No, thank you", followed by "What is it you don't understand about foxtrot oscar?" should they be undeterred by my first reply, invariably has the desired effect and stops any further conversation on the subject very satisfactorily.
    It's a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known........Sydney Carton.
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 13th Jun 17, 7:59 PM
    • 9,637 Posts
    • 50,675 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    A few weeks back, one of them tried it on me, beginning his spiel, as I walked past, with "Have you got a minute mate?"

    I glared at him and, in a raised voice, said "I'M NOT YOUR MATE! YOU DON'T EVEN KNOW ME!"

    By the time he'd coughed up an apology, I was 5 yards away, and fast opening the gap.
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1161
    • bengal-stripe
    • By bengal-stripe 13th Jun 17, 9:33 PM
    • 3,139 Posts
    • 2,018 Thanks
    bengal-stripe
    Or alternatively they'll give the guy a bonus for persistence, after all, it's his job to get people who don't want one to take out a credit card.
    Originally posted by agrinnall
    On the other hand, if the pushy agent frequently signs-up applicants who, after a credit search, get denied; he might find himself out of a job pretty soon.
    • Chrysalis
    • By Chrysalis 14th Jun 17, 7:38 AM
    • 1,985 Posts
    • 916 Thanks
    Chrysalis
    this is what happens when people get paid on commission. The guy is just trying to make a living so I dont feel bad to him.

    Your friend could have just walked away but if he does get something through the post he can ask to be removed from their list.
    • venison
    • By venison 14th Jun 17, 9:05 PM
    • 1,171 Posts
    • 1,223 Thanks
    venison
    OP this friend who has NO income? what does he live off ?

    You would be more of a friend if you told him to grow a pair and move on.
    Doomed I say we're all doomed.
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 15th Jun 17, 12:19 AM
    • 1,063 Posts
    • 667 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    Find a friend who has a good sense of humour and plenty of free time, to say to the salesman, "You know, I think I might be interested. Can you give me some more details ?" Then post the hour-long video on YouTube.
    The sales people rely on us not wanting to be rude to them, but they can't be rude to us.

    Double-glazing sales people used to really suffer whenever they called my granny.
    • Fingerbobs
    • By Fingerbobs 16th Jun 17, 2:41 PM
    • 335 Posts
    • 77 Thanks
    Fingerbobs
    Whereas I can have a certain amount of sympathy for someone who has anxiety problems and finds themselves in a similar position, I find a simple "No, thank you", followed by "What is it you don't understand about foxtrot oscar?" should they be undeterred by my first reply, invariably has the desired effect and stops any further conversation on the subject very satisfactorily.
    Originally posted by Missus Hyde
    I have had anxiety issues, and personally I have no problem with salespeople like this, although I appreciate everyone is different.


    My method is to politely and cheerfully say "No, I'm not interested, thank you" then if they make any further representations I just totally ignore them as though they weren't there and get on with what I was doing.
    • Shakin Steve
    • By Shakin Steve 16th Jun 17, 8:02 PM
    • 936 Posts
    • 665 Thanks
    Shakin Steve
    If he'd have persuaded your mate to sign up, it wouldn't have got far, once they did a credit search. So....the salesman might have got paid for a lead, but not for a sign up. And your friend would have a hard search on his credit file.
    I came into this world with nothing and I've got most of it left.
    • Anthorn
    • By Anthorn 16th Jun 17, 10:51 PM
    • 3,101 Posts
    • 798 Thanks
    Anthorn
    Hi, hope I'm in the right place.

    There has been a stand in my local shopping centre for some people selling credit cards recently. I've avoided them so far but yesterday they caught a friend off guard and he's the type of person who can't say no.

    He told them repeatedly that he has no income and has no need or desire to sign up for credit. The guy kept telling him that this is how you build up credit and pushed really hard. My friend said he felt intimidated and like he couldn't get away unless he gave them his contact details. I was actually impressed that he got away with just that.

    What are the rules on pushy sales, particularly for something like credit? The guy was repeatedly told this is not something he could afford but kept insisting it was needed, potentially getting my friend in trouble.

    Does anyone know who is the best person to complain to?

    I've advised my friend to ask them to remove his details from their system when they call and to ask for an address to complain to.
    Originally posted by clairesilverspar
    Strange post: I have never experienced a credit card salesperson whether pushy or otherwise and the only job selling credit cards that I can find is in India.

    On salespersons in general, we must recognise that they are doing their best to earn a living and will be more interested in a potential customer they regard as a "live one". So don't be a live one.
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