Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Miss $
    • By Miss $ 12th Jun 17, 10:25 AM
    • 162Posts
    • 62Thanks
    Miss $
    House Deeds
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:25 AM
    House Deeds 12th Jun 17 at 10:25 AM
    Hi All,

    We have recently bought a house and completed nearly 3 weeks ago.

    After speaking to neighbours it would appear we potentially could have an extra 6 foot of garden beyond our current fence, neighbours in the street have had their deeds checked and this is the case so some have extended their gardens, the news is now making it's way down the street.

    My question is, do we receive a copy of the deeds as we have just recently bought the house? If so would it be easy enough to find out this information about the garden size from it, or would a solicitor need to do this for us and make enquiries on our behalf?

    Thanks
    Sarah
Page 1
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 12th Jun 17, 10:34 AM
    • 4,763 Posts
    • 20,777 Thanks
    Slinky
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:34 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:34 AM
    You should have had a title plan amongst the documents you received from your solicitor during the enquiries. Have you looked?
    • Miss $
    • By Miss $ 12th Jun 17, 10:47 AM
    • 162 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    Miss $
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:47 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:47 AM
    Yes I have had a look and did receive this but can't see anything on there about the land at the back
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Jun 17, 11:04 AM
    • 23,697 Posts
    • 89,668 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 17, 11:04 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 17, 11:04 AM
    The title plan is unlikely to give details of some "extra land;' it will just show a red line enclosing what's yours.

    By comparing the line with what things are like in the real world, you may be able to see if 2 metres appear to be missing.

    You can buy your neighbours' title plans from the Land Registry, contrast and compare, all for the price of a few pints:

    https://www.gov.uk/search-property-information-land-registry
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 12th Jun 17, 11:16 AM
    • 28,647 Posts
    • 72,975 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 17, 11:16 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 17, 11:16 AM
    After speaking to neighbours it would appear we potentially could have an extra 6 foot of garden beyond our current fence, neighbours in the street have had their deeds checked and this is the case so some have extended their gardens, the news is now making it's way down the street.
    Originally posted by Miss $
    It's possible that the 6 foot was an access to the backs of the garden which has been disused long enough for people to 'take over' the land.
    • Miss $
    • By Miss $ 12th Jun 17, 1:38 PM
    • 162 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    Miss $
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 17, 1:38 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 17, 1:38 PM
    The title plan is unlikely to give details of some "extra land;' it will just show a red line enclosing what's yours.

    By comparing the line with what things are like in the real world, you may be able to see if 2 metres appear to be missing.

    You can buy your neighbours' title plans from the Land Registry, contrast and compare, all for the price of a few pints:

    https://www.gov.uk/search-property-information-land-registry
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Thanks, will have a look into this.

    I will also study the plans again tonight to see, but it's all fields behind so hard to go by whats there, if you get me
    • Miss $
    • By Miss $ 12th Jun 17, 1:38 PM
    • 162 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    Miss $
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 17, 1:38 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 17, 1:38 PM
    It's possible that the 6 foot was an access to the backs of the garden which has been disused long enough for people to 'take over' the land.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Quite possibly as alot of the gardens including ours to have gates to the back
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Jun 17, 2:37 PM
    • 23,697 Posts
    • 89,668 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 17, 2:37 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 17, 2:37 PM
    Long, long ago in a galaxy far away.....the bin men used to go down rear pedestrian lanes and collect the bins, rubbish sacks etc. They'd even return the bin to the right garden gate.

    Then came privatisation with its efficiency drives, closely followed by elfin safety, which meant that the 'refuse operatives,' as they were by then known, could no longer go beyond the pavements for fear they might fall and not be insured.

    The back lanes fell into disuse; their other function as a route for the British worker and his/her bicycle no longer being of interest. And as they began to grow-over, people worried who might lurk in them, perhaps waiting to steal things, shoot-up or just steal the occasional child.

    And so it came to pass that some bold individuals began to fence off the old back alleys, incorporating them into their gardens, with others quickly following, emboldened by the lack of action visited upon their errant neighbours by the faceless ones carrying clipboards.

    Here endeth the history lesson.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 12th Jun 17, 3:15 PM
    • 10,047 Posts
    • 8,114 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 17, 3:15 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 17, 3:15 PM
    They'd even return the bin to the right garden gate.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    You speak of times so long ago that the brain cannot comprehend such actions
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 12th Jun 17, 3:19 PM
    • 60,993 Posts
    • 356,268 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    I'd sit and see what everybody else did and eventually get round to seeing/checking my deeds and comparing.... even if you do own that land, do you have any idea of the price of that "bit of fence"?

    Once you see the cost it might not be quite so important for the next few years.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 12th Jun 17, 3:30 PM
    • 28,647 Posts
    • 72,975 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Long, long ago in a galaxy far away.....the bin men used to go down rear pedestrian lanes and collect the bins, rubbish sacks etc.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Even further back, the night soil men used the lanes to collect another kind of 'rubbish'.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Jun 17, 10:45 AM
    • 23,697 Posts
    • 89,668 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Even further back, the night soil men used the lanes to collect another kind of 'rubbish'.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Or if you live in the countryside, perhaps they didn't.

    In which case, the soil close to the house may still be darker in colour and especially nice to till.

    Thought for the Day for those who grow veg.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Jun 17, 12:20 PM
    • 14,237 Posts
    • 38,563 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Long, long ago in a galaxy far away.....the bin men used to go down rear pedestrian lanes and collect the bins, rubbish sacks etc. They'd even return the bin to the right garden gate.

    Then came privatisation with its efficiency drives, closely followed by elfin safety, which meant that the 'refuse operatives,' as they were by then known, could no longer go beyond the pavements for fear they might fall and not be insured.

    The back lanes fell into disuse; their other function as a route for the British worker and his/her bicycle no longer being of interest. And as they began to grow-over, people worried who might lurk in them, perhaps waiting to steal things, shoot-up or just steal the occasional child.

    And so it came to pass that some bold individuals began to fence off the old back alleys, incorporating them into their gardens, with others quickly following, emboldened by the lack of action visited upon their errant neighbours by the faceless ones carrying clipboards.

    Here endeth the history lesson.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    I remember that.

    But there is/was a variety of reasons for back alleys.

    So - my suspicion would be that these 6' strips of land aren't just = a strip of my garden that is the other side of the fence. They are in fact back alleys.

    Added to which - I expect the back alley has/will retain Right of Way across it.
    New Year's Resolution already made -

    Don't get mad....get firm ...
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 13th Jun 17, 12:23 PM
    • 28,647 Posts
    • 72,975 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Or if you live in the countryside, perhaps they didn't.

    In which case, the soil close to the house may still be darker in colour and especially nice to till.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Very true.

    My grandparents - who lived well off the beaten track and had a Ty Bach down the bottom of the garden - also had the most amazing veg garden.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

360Posts Today

2,963Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Have a lovely weekend folks. Don't do anything (fiscally) that I wouldn't do!

  • RT @thismorning: With his last deals of the year, @MartinSLewis wishes us all a 'very merry Christmas, a happy Hanukkah and a wonderful and?

  • RT @stoneygran: @MartinSLewis I furtively used a pub toilet last night before getting on the bus and felt really guilty!

  • Follow Martin